Hersha Patel
Hersha Patel
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  • Joined Jan 14, 2012
Hi I'm Hersha Patel an actor, presenter and film-maker and I'm into cooking, comedy and wellbeing..

Video
Comedy - The Package
Comedy - The Package
14 hours ago
The many pitfalls of modern day parenting...
Comedy Sketch - What does Love need?
Comedy Sketch - What does Love need?
4 days ago
Love is an ever evolving beast.
Blog Post - Me and my new BFF Mr Nigel NG!!
Blog Post - Me and my new BFF Mr Nigel NG!!
16 days ago
To all my new friends/haters MrNigelNg and I have just had a lovely afternoon discussing my 'crimes' against rice... watch this space.. collab coming soon, give me a follow!
Easy Aubergine & Potato Curry | Gujerati Homestyle
Easy Aubergine & Potato Curry | Gujerati Homestyle
Year ago
Serves two with rice or other things. Time: 35mins 1 medium/small aubergine 1 small potato (half size of aubergine) 1 small red onion 2 tomatoes (1 if you like it drier) 6 tbs cooking oil 2 garlic cloves 1 green chilli 1 inch knob of ginger 2 handfuls coriander (optional SPICE TIN 1 tsp mustard seeds 1 tsp cumin seeds 1 tsp turmeric 1 tsp coriander powder 1 tsp cumin powder 1/2 tsp garam masala/ curry powder First up get all you ingredients out and washed, peeled and put your saucepan on the hob.. Chop the aubergine to 1 inch square & potato slightly smaller around 1 cm (this is so they’ll cook evenly). Put to one side. Start heating your pan on a very low heat & finely chop the chilli and garlic and grate the ginger. Add oil to the pan & wang up to a medium heat & add the mustard seeds. When they start to pop turn the heat to low add the cumin seeds, ginger/garlic/chilli along with the potato and aubergine. Stir and add the rest of the spices along with a tsp of salt. (you can add more later when tasting) Cover and cook for 10 minutes on low, if its starts to stick add a few drops of water. Whilst you wait chop the tomato similar size as potato and onion finer. After 10 minutes the potato should be slightly soft (not cooked though) if they are add the toms & onion. Stir cover and cook on a medium/high heat for 15-20 minutes till its all cooked through. Stir occasionally to stop from sticking and add a bit more oil or tiny bit of water if its sticking (you dont want to add too much water). Once cooked taste to check seasoning, add the fresh coriander and stir through turn off heat. Serve with steamed greens, dairy free yoghurt, mango chutney, popadoms and rice.
Onion Bhajis | Hersha Patel
Onion Bhajis | Hersha Patel
Year ago
The only time I regress back to my teenage years is when I go home to (visit my parents) be fed by my parents. I cant help it, it's like Ive entered a time warp! When I cant and crave the taste of the spice and am feeling pretty last these onions Bhajis can be ready in under 25 mins are a great plan-based source of protein and taste the bomb, so winner all around! ps. if you want to get this and more recipes in easy to use PDF format then sign up to my newsletter via this link cookwithalittleindian.biz/smugrecipe Oven Baked Bhajis in Under 25 min (makes around 12) 150g or a medium/large red onion 100g Gram/Chickpea flour 2 tbs rice flour* 1tsp baking powder 1tsp salt 2 tsp garam masala/curry powder 1 tsp turmeric 4tbs oil. Heat oven to 180C/350F. Halve the onion end to end and finely slice. (use a sharp knife!) Bung into a bowl with all the other ingredients and only 1 tbsp of the oil. Slowly add water and mix until you get a thick paste consistency. TASTE now for salt content it will be rank but make sure seasoning's right. Oil a large baking tray and plonk small loose dollops of the mixture. Keep the balls loose which will keep them crisp and lighter. Oven cook for 18-20 mins (remove after 10 minutes and brush them with oil to stop them drying). Eat with ketchup or easy mint and tomatoes chutney (also on channel). Bon ap! xxx *dont use if you dont have it.. also can just take normal white rice and blend in high speed blender to a fine powder.
Pranayama Breathing for Stressy times! | Hersha Patel
Pranayama Breathing for Stressy times! | Hersha Patel
Year ago
Greetings sailors, this week no recipe but a quick video and a bit of chat on the effects of breath control or pranayama on chronic anxiety & stress. Last night, 3.47am to be precise, during a well timed bought of anxiety I sat stuffing my face with dry oatcakes trying not to feel the suffocating weight of life overcome me. Previously this occurrence would have been a complete day ruiner. But being the wise sage that I am now I woke up a fe hours later, felt like crap, made my bed, cried a bit then sat and did some breath work. This one in particular (there are many) called Humming Bee is the main one I use (alternate nostril being another good one). During my Ayurvedic therapy a couple years ago at One World Ayurveda, when stress levels were max Dr Aparana PHD, no less, described this alongside alternate nostril breathing as being the most effective method of relieving anxiety.. I was pretty skeptical.. for a start I felt like a right dick doing it and then for seconds its just humming! How is that going to make me feel any better? To quote the good Dr "Nadi Shuddi Pranayma (humming breathwork) causes modulation of the sympathetic and parasympathetic activity." In other words the controlled breathing & vibrations are taking your body from a state of panic (sympathetic) which is where inflammation occurs, to calm and restful (parasympathetic). Does it work? Is it effective? Who knows! All I can say is that I'm sitting here writing this, its 3pm and I feel content and focused and ready to be more smug till the day ends. Love, Hersh xx To practice Brahmari Pranayama or Hummingbee sit comfortably, shoulders relaxed. Start by taking a few breaths, and close your eyes Keeping the mouth closed, inhale deeply through the nostrils. Slowly Exhaling fully, make the humming sound of the letter M. Repeat for several minutes. CONSULT A PROFESSIONAL IF YOU ARE PREGNANT OR SUFFERING FROM ILLNESS OR UNSURE
Dal Makhani | Smoky Lentils | Cook with a Little Indian
Dal Makhani | Smoky Lentils | Cook with a Little Indian
Year ago
Dal Makhani or Buttery Lentils, is a classic in the world of Indian restaurant fare. I love the rich creaminess and layers of flavour that come with the slow cooking and spices and personally don't feel the need for the butter or cream. (What?!?!) But instead use cashew cream to finish. Onto le recipe.. First up.. don't be scared off by the ingredients list and steps! All these spices, if you like a bit of spice cooking, you will use in other ways and they'll last for ages. And dont even get me started on the health benefits of the old black Urad bean... high in protein, iron, potassium fibre and... smugness! Errr This is a recipe you want to take your time over and enjoy so do enjoy! INGREDIENTS & METHOD Cooking Time: 1hr 15” Possible overnight prep. 100g dry urad lentils 100g dry kidney beans OR 1 200g tin pre-cooked beluga or puy 1 200g tin kidney beans 3tbs cooking oil 1 medium red onion finely chopped 4 cloves garlic finely chopped or smashed 1 2inch knob ginger grated 2 small chillies finely chopped 2 medium tomatoes chopped 4 cardamom pods 4 cloves 1 2 inch cinnamon stick 2 Indian Bay leaves (or regular) 1tsp turmeric 2 tsp garam masala 50g cashew nuts soaked for at least 30 mins in hot water (or 2 tbs cashew butter or coconut cream) 1/2 tsp salt to taste For smoking: 1 piece of natural coal a hollowed half an onion, lemon or a small heatproof vessel (I used a spice pot) 1 tsp ghee or coconut oil NIGHT BEFORE If using dried, soak the beans and lentils over-night. If using whole nuts, soak the cashews in hot water (preferably same time as Urad or an hour before cooking) BEFORE COOKING Finely chop the onion, garlic and chilli. Grate the ginger, chop the tomatoes and leave all next to cooker. Put all spices next to cooker. Rinse the cashews and blend with enough water to make a thick cream consistency, leave next to cooker. COOKING If using dried, wash the beans well and boil in loads of water for 20 mins skimming foam scum. (you can do this whilst you cook the onions and tomatoes) On a medium heat pour the oil into a large pan and then add the cardamom, cloves, cinnamon and bay leaves and heat for 15 to 20 seconds to release the aroma, the cloves will pop. Then bung in the onion, garlic, ginger & chilli. Give them a stir, cover and cook on slightly lower heat for 10 minutes until the onions are soft and translucent. Add the tomatoes, turmeric and garam masala stir cover and cook for 10-15 minutes until you get a reduced looking stew. Dont worry if it sticks just scrape and stir.. its all good flavour. Then drain and add the lentils and beans and cover with water cooking on a simmer for 30 minutes, add more water if needed. This next part you dont have to do.. but makes a creamier dal: take off the heat and avoiding the whole spices, either with a hand-blender or taking some out, blend a small amount of the dal and add back. Bung back on the heat, pour over the blended cashews (or alternate) add salt and taste for seasoning. Continue to simmer for at least 10 minutes. The longer you simmer the more the flavours will develop. SMOKING: If you’re doing this part, heat the coal over a hot flame until its white hot, this will take a good 5/6 minutes. Then using tongs or two forks (?!) Place the coal into the vessel and gently into the middle of the dish and pour over the oil. It will start smoking immediately at which point bung on the lid and let it smoke for about 3 minutes, then add salt and taste the dal for smokiness.. you may want to smoke her up a bit more. I serve it with rice, popadoms, fresh chutney all things you can find on the channel. xxx
Vegetable Curry | Cook with a Little Indian
Vegetable Curry | Cook with a Little Indian
Year ago
We live in such a fast-paced modern world that when it comes to cooking it's so important to slow down, take your time and really craft your cooking. Whatever! Gadgets all the way I say! As I kindly demonstrated above.. A curry paste done by hand can be a long arduous journey into misery.. whereas one created by the fair hands of modern technology is a little skip into a cloud of delicious fragrant 5 minute clouds of fun. (literally what am i talking about?) And so to the recipe... If you're in need of some healthy plant-based inspiration then try this delightful South Indian inspired green curry that’s light, flavourful and delice! NOTE IF YOU WANT TO ADD MEAT: if using raw meat add that after the paste has cooked and brown for 5 minutes before adding the coconut milk. If using cooked meat add as green veg. RECIPED: Serves 2 alone or 4 with rice or breads. THE PASTE 3 cloves of garlic 1 inch knob ginger 1 red chilli 1 inch knob fresh or 1 tsp powdered turmeric 3 small shallots or 1 medium red onion 15g or a handful of coriander stalks (save leaves for end) 1 tsp cumin 2 stalks of lemongrass cut to flesh middle grated zest of a lime (save juice for later) 10 dried or fresh curry leaves (if you have them) 1 tbsp oil THE MAIN 1tbsp oil 1 tin light coconut milk (or can go full for creamier curry) 1 medium sweet potato 1 medium/small aubergine 150g seasonal greens, kale, sugar snap, asparagus or peas. 1/2tsp sugar. salt Blend all of the PASTE ingredients in an electric device (if needed add a splash of water). If you don't have a device hope everything very finely and use a pestle & mortar… and maybe pay a small child to grind it. Heat a tbs oil in a large pan and fry the paste on a gentle heat with the lid on for about 5 minutes. Chop the aubergine & sweet potato into bite sized chunks. When the strong smell of the garlic/ginger has died down add the potato and aubergine, pour over the coconut milk and simmer this for around 10 minutes on a medium heat, WITH THE LID ON. Then add your chopped green veg and cook for another 5 minutes. Finally squeeze over the juice of half a lime, a teaspoon of salt, a teaspoon of sugar, coriander leaves stir, taste and adjust seasonings.. you may need more lime, sugar and salt. Serve with rice or bread or rice noodles would also be great in a bowl with a dollop of coconut yoghurt! xxxx
Banana Bread | Cook with a Little Indian
Banana Bread | Cook with a Little Indian
Year ago
This guy has been desperate to bake for you so as its Christmas I thought I'd let him have his moment... here’s cousin Hareem with a terrible recipe for his banana bread. Below is a really good recipe for my chai spiced banana bread, I literally just made it to double check ingredients & can confirm that it is the bomb, moist and light and very very easy to make. Its also plant-based and GF but you can sub in butter, eggs regular flour if you’d rather. Go forth, and eat cake and be Merry! Film Devised and Directed by 9 year old Ace Verity. RECIPE 100g Oat flour 100g Buckwheat 70g Coconut oil 3 Ripe mashed ripe bananas mashed 2 tbsp Maple syrup 2 eggs or Flax equivalent (2 tbs flax meal or chia seeds in 4 tbs water, left to thicken for 5 mins) 50ml nut milk I use almond 1 tbsp baking powder 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 tbsp ginger 2 tsp chai spice powder or mixed spice 50g chopped walnuts or hazelnuts salt Preheat oven to 160c. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl to get a thick paste consistency. Pour into a lined loaf tin, bake for 1 hour.. if the top starts to get too dark and dry looking brush some oil on and cover with foil (but it should be ok). After an hour have a little inspection.. the texture should be fairly moist but not gluey so bake for a little longer if it still looks raw after an hour. Happy baking and Hareem I think you need to work on your baking skills.. and hygiene.. and accent.. big love xx
Turmeric Latte | Cook with a Little Indian
Turmeric Latte | Cook with a Little Indian
Year ago
Hands up who still feels like a bit of a wanker when requesting a Turmeric Latte in public? If yes then dont, youre not a wanker you're a winner! Used for over 5000 years in Ayurvedic medicine it's a mystical root that has a plethora of healing properties.. so it was only a matter of time (4995 years) before the 'Westerners” got on board... good one lads! I also pride myself on being late to the party, so now that the “Golden Milk” madness of last year has died down and we are entering flu season I offer you my Turmeric Latte recipe... which is technically a ginger, turmeric latte but there we go. Recipe Notes: I love it quite spicy so half the ginger if you like less of a kick. Try not to use fat free milk and of you can add a bit of coconut oil, this will make the turmeric even more potent to your insides (its fat soluble). If you dont have all the spices then go with just the turmeric, ginger and black pepper (or even loose the ginger). Im sure you all heard talk of the benefits of turmeric and the other spices so I want bore you.. just know that whilst youre drinking this you will feel infinitely more smug and better than everyone else. RECIPE 500ml/2 cups milk of choice (not fat free if poss) 2 inch knob ginger peeled 1 inch fresh turmeric peeled 2 cardamom pods 2 cloves A pinch of black pepper Sweetener to taste. Method If you have a blender blend everything, heat gently for 5/10 mins, strain and drink! If you have no blender grate the fresh ingredients if youre using, bash the cardamom and put everything in a pan and heat gently for 5/10 mins, strain and drink! Many thankyous x
Potato Curry Quick and Easy | Cook with a Little Indian
Potato Curry Quick and Easy | Cook with a Little Indian
Year ago
This weeks episode was unplanned ie we had no recipe! A bold move Mr Bond....? Yes a bold move that paid off with a mega tasty spicy potato dish. Kate, the cousin in-law and amazing chef, was banging on and about potatoes telling me how under represented they were (theyll make you fat I hear!) so we went with them. The rules were that we were going to somehow use potatoes, try and do it all within 20 minutes and use only 5 ingredients. The results were most satisfying both in taste and time, though my attempt to make it a 5 ingredient challenge were not so much. This is a dish you could have with a curry, a roasted veg salad and coconut yoghurt/mint sauce, a traditional roast, or as part of a buffet situation (who doesnt love a buffet?!). What am I even going on about now.. I dont really know what to call as technically its not a curry but I didn't know what to call it and most likely people will find it if I cal it a curry! RECIPE & METHOD 750g new potatoes boiled & halved if large. 2 tbsp cooking oil (we used coconut) 1 whole lime 2inch knob/1 tbsp minced ginger 50g or a big handful coriander 4 spring onions 2 tsp curry powder 1 tsp dried chilli 2 tsp yellow mustard seeds (optional or could use cumin seeds instead) 3 tbs desiccated coconut or 1 tin milk salt If you’ve not already done so get your potatoes cooked, boil the kettle halve any larger potatoes and boil in salted water for about 10 mins till soft and cooked through. Meanwhile prep all the other ingredients. Peel and finely chop or grate the ginger. Wash and chop the spring onions including all the green stem, waste nothing! Wash and separate the coriander leaves from stems and finely chop the stems. You ideally need about 2 tbs. Don't worry if some leaf ends up in it. Juice the lime and leave to one side. With the remaining lime rind take half and chop into very small pieces (smaller than you see in the video). Heat a tbsp of cooking oil in a frying pan and fry the lime on a medium heat.. try not stir or move about as you want them to caramelise. Moving them will break the sugars up and it will burn quicker. After a minute or two once the limes are caramelised add the ginger and fry for another minute then add the coriander stalks and if you have them the yellow mustard seeds and fry for a minute. Bung in two thirds of the spring onions half the lime juice, the dried chilli and curry powder and stir fry for a minute. Add the potatoes so they cover the surface area of the pan in one layer. If your pan's too small you could move to an oven (180c) or two pans. This is to ensure the potatoes get as browned as possible. If you need to add the other tbsp of oil. Then with a fish slice or masher gently squash the potatoes so they flatten a bit but dont break into pieces. Its a good way to brown more and let more flavour get in to the potatoes. Cook for a minutes or two each side and then either add the dessicated coconut or the coconut milk. If using dessicated continue to brown the potato for around 5 minutes and watch the coconut doesn't burn. If using milk simmer gently to let the flavours infuse for 2 minutes. Then add the lime juice and remaining coriander leaves and onions stir, season, taste and serve. Thanks for watching and try and enjoy! xx
Vegetarian BBQ Ideas | Roast Cabbage with a Coconut Sauce | Cook with a Little Indain
Vegetarian BBQ Ideas | Roast Cabbage with a Coconut Sauce | Cook with a Little Indain
Year ago
Oven cooked or BBQ'd this simple recipe is an easy way to eat vegetables when you're not feeling meaty. It was inspired by a recent trip to a trendy restaurant called, The Field in Hackney, which did some quite fancy things to their cabbages. I wanted to make a sauce that was subtle and not too overtly 'curry-like'... it had nothing to do with the fact that I was in France with only about 4 things so had to be inventive.. RECIPE & METHOD 1 pointed/hispi cabbage 2 tbsp cooking oil of choice 2 large shallots or 6 small or 2 medium onions 2inch knob fresh turmeric or 1 tsp powder 1 red chilli 2 tsp mustard seeds A tin of coconut milk (400ml) or if its coconut cream use only 200ml and add water. Half a lemon Salt to taste Handful of cashew and peanuts (toasted if you want) Foil (if doing in oven and have a lidded dish you can put them in there instead and save on waste!) ROASTING THE CABBAGE First up either get your coals on the go or preheat oven to 180 Cut the cabbage lengthways into quarters. Oil and wrap individually in foil. (If you're using an oven you can wrap them all in one piece or if you have one just put them in a casserole dish with a lid on.) Place the foils in the bbq alongside the coals, turn every 10/15 minutes. They should take anything from 30-45 minutes depending on size) MAKING THE SAUCE Finely slice the onions. If using fresh scrape and grate the turmeric and finely chop the chilli. Heat the oil in a frying pan, add 2 tsp of mustard seeds and wait for them to pop. Add the onions and cook for around 7/8 minutes. Once the onions have softened add the chilli and turmeric. Stir fry for around 3-4 minutes make sure heat is low and then pour over the coconut milk a squeeze of lemon, a pinch of salt. Reduce down so it thickens slightly and then taste and adjust salt/lemon and leave to one side. After 30 minutes, if foil wrapped, check the cabbages.. if you stick a knife in the thickest part you want it to be nice and soft. Cook for longer if not. Once your cabbages are soft if you want them to have a bit of charring just shove them foil free back on the grill for a few minutes. Then place them on a plate, warm the sauce through if needed, pour over the cabbages and sprinkle with some toasted peanuts and cashews. I had it with roasted new potatoes and a big salad. Happy grilling!
Quick Mango Chutney | Cook with a Little Indian
Quick Mango Chutney | Cook with a Little Indian
Year ago
The other week I bought a cheap and dodgy looking mango and thought I'd use it make up a quick mango chutney recipe on the spot. The result was satisfying enough to share it with you so here it is.. A quick video for a quick recipe for an easy mango chutney that I made up on the spot a few weeks ago that tasted nice.
Tandoori Roast Cauliflower | Cook with a Little Indian
Tandoori Roast Cauliflower | Cook with a Little Indian
2 years ago
I’ve always felt very strongly about caring for our elderly population so I like to ‘give back’ to my old person Marie by regularly visiting her and letting her listen to my life stresses.. she loves it. But sometimes I need to remind her of just how much she enjoys it so use my insane cooking skills to get her back on side. I recently cooked her some tasty and easy Tandoori Style Chicken and also Cauliflower which was just the ticket! This recipe is a good and simple plant-based Tandoori style marinade which is great for vegetables, meat and fish. This is the cauliflower version the chicken Vid is exactly the same but have swapped out the bird for the vegetable! Its a great BBQ item or just as easy in the Oven so Ill give details on both methods. Happy cooking and eating! Ingredients: Copy and Paste this into your documents so you can read it easier! serves 4 2 small cauliflowers Marinade 200ml coconut yoghurt (CoYo is the brand I use, has very little added) 2tb tomato puree 1 tb honey ½ lemon juiced 4 cloves garlic 2inch knob ginger 1 heaped tsp garam masala 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp coriander seasoning Blend the marinade ingredients in a food processor. Halve the cauliflower and pour over the marinade, pushing as much of it as you can right into the crevices. Try and marinade for at least 2 hours. For Oven Method: If cooking in the oven you can also just cut the cauliflower into florets which will cook quicker. If doing this cook at 170C for around 35/40 mins. If keeping as big halves cook at 150C for 45/50 mins. You want the cauliflower to be cooked all the way through without burning the marinade. If this seems to be happening then lower the heat and cook for longer. I try to keep foil cooking to a minimum. For BBQ Method Foil wrap the cauliflower and place on the direct heat of the bbq. Close the lid and cook for 20 mins each side. You want the cauliflower to be softening but slightly firm all the way through. Then remove them from the foil and place over the direct heat turning every few minutes, you want them to brown nicely and the sugars to start caramelising. I served with roasted cumin spiced new potatoes, broad bean toasted almond and dill salad and some bbq'd tomato chutney. Tres bone!
Tandoori Chicken | Cook with a Little Indian
Tandoori Chicken | Cook with a Little Indian
2 years ago
I’ve always felt very strongly about caring for our elderly population so I like to ‘give back’ to my old person Marie by regularly visiting her and letting her listen to my life stresses.. she loves it. But sometimes I need to remind her of just how much she enjoys it so use my insane cooking skills to get her back on side. I recently cooked her some tasty and easy Tandoori Style Chicken and also Cauliflower which was just the ticket! This recipe is a good and simple plant-based Tandoori style marinade which is great for vegetables, meat and fish. This is the chicken version the Cauliflower Vid is the exactly same but have swapped out the bird for the vegetable! Its a great BBQ item or just as easy in the Oven so Ill give details on both methods. Happy cooking and eating! Ingredients: Copy and Paste this into your documents so you can read it easier! 1 free-range organic chicken - spatchcocked (see demo in video or ask you butcher to do it) If you're bird is massive maybe double the marinade. Marinade 200ml coconut yoghurt (CoYo is the brand I use, has very little added) 2tb tomato puree 1 tb honey ½ lemon juiced 4 cloves garlic 2inch knob ginger 1 heaped tsp garam masala 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp coriander 1 tsp salt To Spatchcock place breast side down with the head end towards you, using some sharp scissors or a sharp knife cut along the side of spine all the way through. Then turn over and flatten it all down with your hands. Place in a dish big enough that it can lay flat and wash hands. Blend the marinade ingredients and pour over the chicken pushing the marinade under skin and all over the place. Refrigerate for 2-8 hours. For Oven Method: Transfer to a roasting dish leaving the marinade dish to one side. Cover the bird with foil and roast at 180 for 40/45 mins until juiced run clear. For the last 10 mins remove the foil pour any juice into the marinade dish and baste the bird. Once it's nice and browned the bird should be cooked. If the juices run clear and the meat is white all the way through the thickest part against the bone, you should be ok. You could also use a meat thermometer which should read 75c or above. If you have any leftover marinade I'd reduce it down and serve as a sauce! For BBQ Create a space in your bbq where there are no coals ie indirect heat. Push them to one side of the bbq or in a circle around the edges or each end of the bbq depending on the size and shape of your grill. Remove the bird from the marinade tray, keeping the tray to one side. Place onto foil and wrap the chicken securely. Place it on the BBQ over the indirect area and close the lid. It should need around 30 mins each side. Check after 20 minutes and let it cook longer if it's not doing much. You want the chicken to be almost cooked ie still a little bit pink inside is ok. At this point remove from the foil breast side up. Pour the juices from the foil back into the marinade tray, mix it up and use this to baste the breast. Then bung it over the direct heat breast side down to brown it around 10 minutes on each side with the lid closed. Be careful, at this point as you don't want the honey to burn so stay vigilant. Once you've browned her up check to make sure the meat is properly cooked. If the juices run clear and the meat is white all the way through to the thickest part against the bone, you should be ok. You could also use a meat thermometer which should read 75c or above. If it's not cooked and looking like more direct heat will burn it, I'd wang it back in the foil for a little bit. I served with the tandoori cauliflower, roasted cumin spiced new potatoes and coronation mayo, broad bean, toasted almond and dill salad and some bbq'd tomato chutney. But just some ketchup and your bare hands would be great too! Enjoy and thank-you for watching! x
Easy Cucumber Pickle - Cook with a Little Indian
Easy Cucumber Pickle - Cook with a Little Indian
2 years ago
Karin Mander is one of my heroes in life.. not because she lives in one of the most ridic. places on Earth (I mean it does help a bit I guess) but because of the wonderful, caring, kind and hardcore woman that she is. When I first met her I'm not going to lie. I was scared of her.. (she had a bad back so was a bit spikey) the house was full of well-spoken family and I had only just started seeing my now husband so was pretty nervous anyway. It was a very intimidating weekend of trying to remember to pronounce my t’s and use my napkin properly and what I gleaned from it was that if Karin did not like me then this would be a serious issue. Thankfully I used my charms (and made her some Dal and Pakora) and we’ve been bezzies ever since. Her interest and knowledge of food is second to none and she is always cooking massive meals for her family or visitors to the estate.. her style is classic British fused with her Swedish heritage so I wanted to celebrate the wonder that is her by getting her to show me how to prepare a simple cucumber pickle from her motherland. Its a very good thing to have in fridge as it can pimp up so many meals with no effort. Its been about 10 years since I've posted due to a long chronic illness, but think Ive cracked it so hopefully I'll be around a bit more now! Recipe & Method 300ml strong vinegar (12%) 300ml Water 100g salt 400g sugar 1kg cucumbers 2 large white onions 1 red or green pepper big handful fresh dill (or dried) 1.5 tbs mustard seeds 2 tbs finely sliced horseradish (optional) 2 large 1l kilner jars sterilised (or equivalent smaller). First up combine the top four ingredients, warm in saucepan until the sugar dissolves (no need to boil) and leave to cool. Then chop cucumber lengthways and then hop in to 1cm half moons. Finely slice the onion and pepper. Shove that all into jars in layers along with other ingredients. Pour over the cooled liquid. Leave in a cool place for at least 2 weeks. Once opened refrigerate. Bon app and thanks for watching! xxxx
Chutney  - Cook with a Little Indian
Chutney - Cook with a Little Indian
2 years ago
Who needs diamonds and play-stations for Christmas when you can make your very own chutney and give it to your favourite friends & family. Lucky, lucky them.. This particular recipe I made back in the summer with wonderful Uncle-in-law Christoper who let me raid his (and Joeys) beautiful home and garden to make this insanely good and easy to make chutney. You can make it at any time of the year just use whatever is in season I've just made it again (its winter now.. sob) using persimmons and they made a great plum replacement. Thanks the Hobbies! Recipe & Method Makes 8/10 small jars 5lb Apples and Pears 5lbs Soft Seasonal Fruit 4 white onions 4inch know ginger 6/8 cloves garlic (depending on size) 6 star anise 2tsp cumin seeds 2tsp cloves 2tsp salt 2 7inch cinnamon sticks 8 dried chillies 1kg brown sugar 1litre cider vinegar 8-10 Sterilised Jars. Peel the hard fruit and cut in to 2 inch-ish chunks and put in to a large saucepan. Finely slice onions and add those. Peel and chop the garlic and scrape and chop the ginger and add. Add the sugar and vinegar, turn on the heat, stir, bring to the boil and simmer for 30 mins. Stone and quarter the plums and add those after 30 mins. Bring to the boil again and cook vigorously for 90 mins or more until the mixture has reduced right down. When you can pull the wooden spoon through and it leaves a channel, its good to go. Grab some jars that have been sterilised - wash in hot soapy water and dry out in a 120 oven - fill them up, label and go forth and giveth as gifts, or enjoy with some nice cheese and port or with a pie or a jacket potato.. xx
Coronation Sauce with Cauliflower Steaks - Cook with A Little Indian
Coronation Sauce with Cauliflower Steaks - Cook with A Little Indian
2 years ago
Coronation Sauce... if done well can be great, if done badly can be rank. I've been meaning to create a vegetarian take on the classic chicken version so back in the summer when professional cook cousin Kate invited me to cook at her Welsh country pad I suggested we use her mad-skills and my spice box to create an Anglo-Indian flavour sensation like no other, and I have to say that this was achieved. Cousin (in-law) Kate is one of my favourite people, very caring, generous, creative and a wee bit on the mad side... which I think makes her (and her cooking) even better! She's a brilliant and creative cook, and has built her own very successful catering business feeding high fashion clients from Vogue to Kate Moss to Mario Testino, and I loved creating this dish with her which is now a favourite. This recipe is a great one to cook at any time of the year but as Christmas approaches its worth considering as an alternative way to cook with veg, particularly if you've got meat free people lurking about. As the sauce is quite rich I'd advise eating this dish with something else, a big leafy salad, some simple veg, roast potatoes, rice. On the day we made it Kate also served roast lamb which went well. Vegan Note - Instead of egg mayo you could use coconut yoghurt or try making vegan mayo using soaked cashew nuts instead of egg yolks which I have yet to try. The recipes is best done in stages and the sauce which you make a double quantity of you can leave in the fridge for a few months and use a base for korma which Kate says her kids love. Recipe (Serves 4 as a side) 2 cauliflowers Spicy/Sweet Base 4 tbsp oil, coconut/sunflower/olive or your choice 1 bulb garlic Same sized piece ginger 2 small chillies or 1 medium 1.5 tsp cumin seeds 1.5 tbs garam masala 3 tbs mango chutney 3 tbs branston pickle or any other sandwich pickle 1 tbsp honey Half a lime Mayonnaise 3 eggs yolks 1 tbsp mustard pref. dijon 400ml flavourless oil, like rapeseed 1.5 tsp vinegar Sweet Nuts 50g almond 2 tbs sugar 1 tsp garam masala salt To Serve Fresh Coriander Tart grapes or Pomegranate (or we used seasonal Gooseberries which we pickled) Stage 1 - Get all your ingredients ready to hand. Crush each garlic clove under a knife, peel and throw into a small pan Scrape the ginger skin away finely slice it and bung that into the pan. Chop of chilli stalks off and throw into the pan. Cover and cook in 2 tbs oil on a medium heat for 8-10 minutes until the garlic has softened. Then add a teaspoon and a half of cumin seeds and 2 tablespoons of garam masala and let that cook out for a couple of minutes. Then in go three tbsp of the pickle, the mango chutney and honey. Cook down for 15 minutes then cool, blend and put to one side. Stage 2 - The Mayo. Separate 3 room temperature egg yolks into a large mixing bowl. Add a tbsp of mustard add start whisking very vigorously whilst very slowly adding the oil. Keep whisking to thicken and then add 2tsp of vinegar and a tsp salt. Then add half of the blended spicy mix and the rest store in the fridge for later use. Whisk it all up and squeeze in half a lime, taste and adjust seasoning. Stage 3 - The Cauliflower Cutting along the stalk lop the cauliflower in half and then you should get a 1.5inch thick steak from each half. (the remaining ends you can either use for other recipes or to bulk out this dish, roast in a pan using the same oil and spice mix) Rub the steaks with 2 tablespoons of oil, a teaspoon of salt, a teaspoon of turmeric and a tbsp of garam masala. Heat 2 tablespoon oil in a pan and place the cauliflowers in. Cook on a very low heat for around 20 minutes each side, turning only once, you want to the cauliflowers to slowly caramelise whilst not burning the spices. Once they're done place on a large platter. Stage 4 - Sweet Nuts In in a frying pan add 50g almonds and a teaspoon of oil, 1.5 tbsp sugar and 2 tsp salt. Give it a shake but do not stir. Then once the sugar does start to dissolve add a teaspoon of garam masala and then you can start stirring. Once its all dissolved and browning slightly remove from heat, watch carefully here as it could burn. Then you're ready to serve! Grab your platter of cauliflower and pour over the some of the sauce the rest you can serve on the side. Garnish with the nuts, coriander and optional pickled or non pickled sweet/sour fruit. We added some seasonal pickled gooseberries. Job Done! Thanks for watching, reading and do let me know if you give it a try! xx
Cauliflower Rice & Coconut | Ready In 10 minutes! | Cook with a Little Indian
Cauliflower Rice & Coconut | Ready In 10 minutes! | Cook with a Little Indian
3 years ago
Yeah its not the same as lovely fluffy basmati rice, but it's quicker, great with a curry and if you're not used to making basmati, much easier! This mega quick recipe is one inspired by the lovely and gorgeous Hemsley sisters, who I met at a food stage I hosted last year at OnBlackheath (if you’ve not heard of them they’re the ones who pretty much put the spiralizer on the map). Such is their notoriety that when they appeared on stage the whole area went from small crowd to completely rammed! I was quite inspired by their use of a cauliflower, namely ricing it, so used said inspiration to give you a quick and interesting way of cooking veg that's also a great alternative to rice. It's very basic so you can add spices and other bits like onion and herbs if you fancy. RECIPE AND METHOD Serves: 2 Time: 10-15mins Tools: Food processor or hand whizzer or blender, wok or large saucepan. 1 medium/small cauliflower 50g dessicated or freshly grated coconut half a lime juiced salt & pepper optional fresh chopped chilli. First up chop the cauliflower into small chunks and then pulse blend. This is best done in a food processor, but as you can see it’ll work in a smoothie maker so use what you have! Then heat a wok or large frying pan and dry toast the coconut gently until its a golden coloured, put that one side and wang the pan back on the heat. Crank up the heat and add a tbsp of coconut oil and once its hot, throw in the chilli if using and fry for 20 seconds, if not just throw in the cauliflower and stir fry. You don’t want it to steam cook and turn to mush so keep stirring and scraping for around 5 minutes until its softened and dried out. Then add back the coconut, squeeze over the lime and season with salt and pepper. Give it a good stir, taste adjust the seasoning and you’re done! Bon ap! xx
Easy Dal Fry | Cook with a Little Indian
Easy Dal Fry | Cook with a Little Indian
3 years ago
I absolutely love Dal, so much so that I once went on national tv to cook one of my favourite recipes, and let me tell you tv's Eamonn Holmes was well into it! (he basically said it looked rank) He was right though it did look a bit murky on the TV, but I stand by what I say, it is mega delicious! Its also the first ever recipe video I did for my little channel (A Most Delicious Dal) Anyway as an ode to my fervour for the humble curried lentil here's another recipe to add to the collection, this time using yellow or moong lentils. I'd say that this is one of the most ubiquitous methods for preparing lentils across India as I've eaten versions of it both north and south. This one is pretty simple and can be ready in about 20 mins which is good for those days you don't want to faff about much but want a decent taste of the spice. The one thing I have recently learned (and always been too lazy to bother with) is that soaking (or even sprouting) is very beneficial for digestion, so I'd advise at least overnight soaking and then rinsing if you have trouble digesting. The cooking time will also reduce which is a bonus! Missing and wrong ingredients advice: If you don't have yellow lentils, red are also good and if you don't have certain spices like asafoetida (a very pungent oniony spice) don't worry just cook taste and if it feels lacking I’d add some more Garam Masala, or you could fry off some ginger at the chilli stage. RECIPE AND METHOD 150g yellow lentils/moong dal (soaked overnight if possible) 4 cloves garlic 2 tbsp oil (I use ghee or coconut) 1 tsp mustard seeds 1 tsp cumin seeds 8 fresh curry leaves (double amount of dry) 1 red chilli 2 banana shallots (or 4 small or 2 small red) 1/4 tsp asafoetida/hing 1 tsp turmeric 2 medium tomato 2 tsp garam masala salt/pepper Rinse the lentils a few times then put them in a saucepan and cover liberally with water. Throw in the unpeeled cloves of garlic and boil the lentils on medium/high heat skimming the foam as you go. (The lentils should take around 15/20 minutes to cook). Next finely slice the onion, chop the tomatoes and finely chop the chilli. In a frying pan, heat the oil on a high heat, get it nice and hot and then add the mustard seeds and let them pop (they will be bitter if they don't). You may want to cover the pan slightly as they pop. As soon as the popping dies down, add the cumin seeds, curry leaves, chilli and onions. Stir well, cover and lower the heat a bit. Let the onion mix cook for 7 minutes. Skim the foam from lentils as you go. Once the onions have softened add the turmeric, asafoetida, salt and pepper, garam masala and tomatoes, give it all a good stir crank up the heat, cover and let the tomatoes reduce down for 10 minutes. Check the lentils, if they're soft mush in the garlic and fish out the skins. If not keep skimming. Check the tomato base every couple minutes, if its sticking too much lower the heat but don't slow cook as you want the tomato base to reduce down to a rich thick paste. The tomatoes will start off looking watery and mushy and as the water cooks out they will appear darker and glistening with just the oil that's left, this part is important as you want the spices to fully cook and release their best flavour. When your toms are cooked add the drained lentils, and stir through. I like a soupy dal so add a bit of water if you need but it's totally up to you! Cover for another minutes or so and let it all cook through and boomtown! Dal-time! I serve these as a side to other curries or if want a quick meal will just have it by itself with a coconut chutney and chopped salad. Hope you enjoy and best of luck! xxx
Cabbage Thoran Easy | Cook with a Little Indian
Cabbage Thoran Easy | Cook with a Little Indian
3 years ago
What the heck is a thoran?!? A weapon? A shoe? A car!! I hear you cry in anguished disbelief. Good and simple is what the heck it is! Good because it tasted good, simple, because it's really not that big of a deal.. Cooked all across Kerala using any old veg thats lying about, its literally a simple way of jazzing up veg and turning it into the main event when you want a quick meal rather than just chopping and steaming (which is also very delicious with a bit olive oil or butter!) The dish hails from Kerala and much like a good old British roastie, everyone does theirs slightly differently. My favourite one was cooked by a lovely lady called Sheba who was the cook at a lush but very simple yoga retreat I stayed at for a few days. She was so sweet and the owner Hari who sadly I didn't film was a major character! Some tips.. this is a dry dish so you don't want to steam cook and end up with a soggy mess.. hence the medium/high heats and vigilance with stir frying. The veg will start sticking a bit but just keep stirring. Hope you enjoy cooking and massive thanks to Hari and Sheba!! check the out if youre ever passing! www.sharanagati-yogahaus.com RECIPE AND METHOD serves 2 as main or 4 as side 1.5 tbsp Coconut Oil ½ whole red cabbage or white a small/medium onion 1 sprig fresh or 10 dry curry leaves 1 tbsp lentils (or broken cashews) 1 tsp cumin 1/2tsp turmeric 1 clove garlic 1 chilli 50g shredded coconut fresh of dried (if dried will need some warm water) hlaf a lemon salt Finely shred the cabbage and onion either by hand or if you've got a food processor pulse the cabbage not the onions as they may turn to mush. (Don't chuck stalks of the cabbage, save them for stock.) Then prep your coconut masala (mix), peel the garlic and pop that into a blender along with the chilli, turmeric and cumin, and coconut. If you're using dessicated add enough hot water to cover the coconut 4 and leave to rehydrate for a few minutes. If using fresh coconut blend straight away and set aside. In a wok or large frying pan heat the oil and add the curry leaves, let then sizzle for a second then add the lentils and let them brown, this'll take aboutt 20 seconds. Once they darken quickly add the cabbage mix.. Give it all a good stir, cover and leave to cook on a medium to high heat for 4 mins. Keep an eye on it and stir a couple times. Whilst thats doing its thing, if you're rehydrating now blend the coconut masala. Add it to the cabbage mix, stir fry on a high heat for a minute or two then lower a little bit (if its sticking) and cook for another 5 minutes to allow the masala to cook through Finally add some lemon, taste and add salt if you want. Eat with rice, yoghurt and chappati, a piece of fish or meat, as a side to a roast or curry, brown some panner, or have it on its own with a coconut chutney or yoghurt raita. Bon Ap! xxx
Delicious and Simple Coconut Chicken Curry | Cook with a Little Indian
Delicious and Simple Coconut Chicken Curry | Cook with a Little Indian
3 years ago
My coconut obsession continues with this easy coconut chicken curry! I like this one as it's less time on the onions and no tomatoes to cook down so a lot speedier! My regular spice tin and garam masala is based on family Gujarati cooking but this recipe is much better with a south Indian spice mix so do try and get those if you can. RECIPE & METHOD Step 1 - Spices If you're in a hurry you can miss this and just use any old garam masala, I dont have a regular south indianmix so make this up when I need it. You could also add turmeric if you wanted, I was just trying to pare things back a bit! Spice Mix - grind these up if you can to a fine powder 2 tsp coriander seeds 1 inch cinnamon stick 4 cloves 3 cardamom pods 2tsp cumin seeds 1/2 tsp pepper Step 2 - Make the Curry 2.5 tbs oil i use coconut raw virgin, but use your fave that's not extra virgin olive. 2 Tbs coriander stalk fresh (save the leaves for a salad and garnish) 4 banana shallots chopped finely (they are bigger than usual shallots - about size of small red onions so if cant get use red onions) 2 clove garlic 1-inch piece of ginger, minced ( I use a grater) 1 small green chilli Curry Spice Mix should be around 4 tsp 400ml tin of coconut milk (make sure no additives in the milk, the're not needed) Optional 150-200g spinach Method Prep you spices, I use a spice grinder but a pestle and mortar will do. Then do all your chopping. Chop the chicken into bite sized chunks, I use a mix of thigh and breast and keep in the bones for flavour and nutrients. Leave to one side. Finely chop the coriander stalks. Leave to one side Finely slice the onion, grate the ginger, chop the garlic and chill. Leave on the chopping board. In a large pot, heat oil over medium heat until it is hot. Add the coriander stalks and let them sizzle for around 20 seconds, they shouldnt burn or brown but give off a nice smell. Add the garlic, ginger, sliced onion, and chilli and cook for 12-15 mins on a medium/low heat covered.. this is very important! Get the onions nice and soft and slightly browned. The raw garlic smell should be gone and it should smell sweet. Add the ground spice mix which will be around 4 tsps worth. Stir for 30 seconds and let the oils and aroma release. Add the chicken and stir letting the chicken get coated with the spices. Pour in the milk. (option to add a cubed potato) Season with salt, simmer uncovered on a medium/low heat for 40mins until the chicken is cooked, stirring every 7 minutes or so, don't boil as the milk will curdle (this isn't bad just looks a bit odd). Once chicken is looking done throw in the spinach, let it wilt and cook down and let the sauce reduce a bit. This will only take 4-5 mins. Taste add more salt if needed and bobs your uncle! I love this with cauliflower rice or good old plain basamati. I use the coriander leaves to make a simple tomato and onion salad. Bon Ap! xxx
My Basic Spice Tin | Tips and Things | Cook with a Little Indian
My Basic Spice Tin | Tips and Things | Cook with a Little Indian
3 years ago
There are literally fourteen million spices you can use when it comes to Indian cooking... This I think is really cool but to the uninitiated possibly a bit off putting, particularly when faced with loads of jars to find and open and close and accidentally spill That's where the humble spice tin comes in! Arm yourself with one (or a couple) of these cheap items and it should hopefully make life a bit easier. I have three tins but if you only do the occasional Indian recipe you might not want to go that hard so I've shown my basic tin. You might prefer to leave out the garam masala (a mix of different spices which can include the spices in the tin) in the middle and swap out for a few whole spices like cinnamon, cloves and cardamon, but I like to keep those in a different tin. xx
Easy Saag Paneer | Spinach & Paneer Curry | Cook with a Little Indian
Easy Saag Paneer | Spinach & Paneer Curry | Cook with a Little Indian
3 years ago
I pride myself on being pretty average, and as an average person I mostly cannot be arsed to make a full on curry every night of the week. How my mother constantlty banged out hers whilst working full time and looking after 3 kids I have no idea... but I digress. One thing I'm quickly learning and loving about cooking is that simplicity really does make for some of the finest flavoured dishes out there and this one is a celebration of that. A curry in under 20 with under 9 ingredients 7 if you aren't into cheese or sugar! The only spice I use is chilli and some nigella seeds which adds a subtle oniony flavour resulting in a mild but I think really satisfying plate of nosh. The sauce tastes rich and creamy and the al dente spinach gives it a really nice fresh taste that is honestly worth the minimal effort! TIPS If you want to save some cash you can make your own cashew butter by simply blending either roasted or non roasted cashews until the oils release and the nuts turn from crumbles into a rich smooth butter that can be stored for aeons! To Beef out: Break some eggs in for a yum brunch style dish. RECIPE & METHOD Temper in a tbs oil 1 tsp Onion Seed/Kalonji 1 fresh red or green chilli 1 tbs cooking oil 4 medium tomatoes 1 rounded tbs cashew butter 1 tsp jaggery 1tsp salt 200g Mature Spinach (baby if you cant find) Paneer made from 1l of milk? (option to fry paneer first) First up chop the tomatoes and finely chop the chillies Heat the oil in a large pan and throw in the nigella seeds. Let them splutter for a few seconds and then add the chilies. Give them a quick stir and then chuck in tomatoes. Stir well and cover, let them cook on a medium high heat for around 7-10 minutes. You'll need to giving them a stir to prevent sticking. Chop the spinach and set aside (wash if you need to also) Cube the paneer. If you want you can also brown the paneer in a saucepan but you don't have to. Simple brush the saucepan with a bit of oil and toast the cube gently for a few minutes on each side. Once your tomatoes have reduced down, add the cashew butter, optional sugar or jaggery and a teaspoon of salt. Stir well and allow the nut butter to dissolve. Then chuck in the spinach, stir it well and well and cover for around 3-4 minutes on a medium to high heat and it'll reduce down to add a sauce-like consistency to the curry. Add the cheese and gently fold it through. Cover, give it another 2/3 mins and your curry should be ready! Really good on its own or served with rice, or as part of a few others, or a piece of fish or side for a roast, or as a brunch side.... Thanks and enjoy! Hersh xx
How to make Paneer | Cook with a little Indian
How to make Paneer | Cook with a little Indian
3 years ago
Paneer is so ridiculously easy to make that it would a crime, a CRIME for the love of god!! to buy it ready made. Bit over the top? Yeah probs. I'm not a huge dairy fan but I love this simple recipe as it's an affordable way to use the best ingredients you can find - I use locally made organic milk from a small farm - to make something that's really versatile. I did a lot testing as there are all kinds of milks and the best was using unhomogenised organic whole milk which is milk that has gone through the least processing but has had the potentially harmful bacteria killed. Non curry ideas.. salt and griddle like halloumi, crumble like feta, don't refrigerated and add honey and fruits, use in stir fries etc etc! RECIPE & TOOLS 1 litre organic whole milk - unhomogenised will make it firmer 1/2 lemon salt - optional saucepan muslin or thin tea-towel sieve large bowl heavy item to press the cheese Pour the milk into a pan and bung it on a low heat and let it come to a boil slowly, be patient as it’ll take around 20-30 minutes When the milk starts to rise its coming to a boil.. turn off the heat and squeeze in a your lemon. Stir it a bit and leave it for around 5 minutes and the curds and whey will separate. Grab your bowl, place the sieve in it and muslin over that. Carefully pour the curd and whey into the muslin. Rinse the curds with water to get rid of any whey and then gather up the sides of the muslin and squeeze out as much water as you can. At this point you add salt, and then either hang it for at least 15 minutes and let the water drip out or place a heavy object on the cheese and let it drain. I prefer to shape the cheese and then place on something heavy, you can use a pestle and mortar or a chopping board with tin cans on the top, or a small child.. (jokes! The small child will most likely wriggle too much) After about 15 minutes its ready to use or to firm up, shape it into a flat rectangle in your muslin and wang it in the fridge for at least half an hour. It will last for a couple days.
Masala Chai Tea | Cook with a Little Indian
Masala Chai Tea | Cook with a Little Indian
3 years ago
If you've ever been to India then without a doubt you'll have come across someone selling chai tea.. it is as big an institution there as getting lashed on Friday night is here. (not me, Im off the booze of late.. yawn) In case you're wondering it was actually the Brits who got the Indians into drinking black tea... During the early twentieth century the East India Tea Company went hard on marketing their black tea to the Indians. It slowly worked, but Indians made it their own by adding their own spice blend, along with sugar and milk. Indian nationals slowly became massive tea drinkers and thus two great nations merged in a cup of tooth-achingly sweet yet deliciously spicy tea. My folks still drink chai every day, I remember when I was a wee bairn my dad being packed off to work with his thermos of chai and a kiss on the cheek.* Their version is much less sweet and with water as some people just use milk which you can. The process is very simple just boil and simmer, the longer you simmer the stronger it'll be. *This is a lie. PDA's are not the Indian way you know. CHAI RECIPE AND METHOD per person 1 full mug of water 1 tsp tea leaves (you can use a teabag but wont be as good) 1 tsp sweetener - optional, I use maple syrup 1 tsp chai masala 1/4 mug of milk (As loads of non dairy milks can split, if using I'd recommend Rude Health Almond or Oatly the barista one and don't boil!) In a saucepan add the water and all ingredients aside from the milk. Set a high heat and set the timer for 9 mins, let it come to the boil and simmer vigourously. If using Dairy milk: When timer goes add the milk and let it boil till it starts to rise then turn the heat down and its ready. You can simmer on a very low heat for as long as you want, the longer the stronger. If using non dairy milk: When timer goes turn off heat and give it a minute to cool, then add the milk turn the heat back on and let it all warm through. It's ready drink now or can be left longer for flavours to develop. Other Ideas! Caffeine free chai latte: leave out water and tea and put a cup of milk with a big spoon of the chai spice and let it gently heat for 10/15 mins, add sweetener if you want. Again you can leave it longer for a stronger taste. Cold chai shake: whizz up a cup of nut milk with a half tsp of chai spice, a date and spoon of nut butter and some ice and sprinkle cinnamon on the top!
Chai Spice Masala | Cook with a Little Indian
Chai Spice Masala | Cook with a Little Indian
3 years ago
What's the point in making you own chai spice mix when there are about a skazilliion tea bag brands that do really good ones? Your own blend is much cheaper and isn't really much work. I also use it for smoothies, porridge and baking so it does get around. Its a great way to make use of the health benefits of spices, which are said to include, strengthening immunity, boosting mood, digestion, antioxidant, reducing inflammation etc etc.. So wanging in a spoon of this mix here and there should hopefully do you some good too! I started off using a lot more spices in my chai and then settled on all the sweeter spices. Which means I use less sugar (see recipe below for other spice options) Next week I'll post the chai tea making process! RECIPE & METHOD Equal Parts - Whole Star Anise - Whole Real/Ceylon Cinnamon Sticks (sweet kind you'd use for baking) - Cardamom Pods - Ginger Powder (I put a bit more in) Options to play around with, I'd advise a smaller ratio i.e. third or quarter - Black Pepper - Nutmeg - Cloves Grind everything aside from the ginger in a coffee grinder if you have one, other-wise a pestle and mortar (if you use that then it'll take longer and don't worry too much about getting a fine powder. Add the ginger powder and mix. Store in an airtight container in a cool dry place try to use within a 3/4 months.
Korma with Emma Willis | Cook with a Little Indian
Korma with Emma Willis | Cook with a Little Indian
3 years ago
We're back in the Kitchen with 'The Brummie', Emma Willis making dishes inspired by curry house favourites, and this week it's the Korma! Korma refers the process of braising meat or vegetable in yoghurt or cream to make a rich stew. The qualities of this dish are mild, sweet and creamy and recipes can vary from fairly simple to insanely heavy. For my take, I've tried to simplify and lighten things to give you a sauce that is still rich, sweet and creamy with toasted edge. If like Steve (Emma's dad) you're all 'where's the meat??' try frying off some free-range lamb and adding the sauce or using it in a mixed veg stir fry. TIPS: Another thing you could do is cook the sauce in the morning (whaaa?!?) and then by the time you come to use it the evening the flavour will have developed nicely! I did it yesterday and it took 20 minutes! If using a 400ml tin use the rest of coconut milk (the watery part) to make a smoothie, with a handful spinach, almond milk, a date, half a banana and cinnamon, blend with ice! RECIPE & METHOD Serves two with an accompaniment Cooking time: Around 30mins 1 tin chickpeas or soaked and cooked equivalent 250g spinach - I used baby in this video but you can use mature also 2 tbs oil 1 inch stick cinnamon 2 dried chilli 2 cardamom pods 1 tsp cumin 1 medium red onion finely chopped 2 cloves Garlic 1 inch knob ginger 25g ground almonds 25g dessicated coconut or fresh shredded 200ml Coconut milk, the top creamy part of the tin (check the label & try to only buy milk that contains water & coconut milk, any added ingredients will give you no creamy part at the top & are probably not beneficial to you) salt & pepper 1 tsp garam masala 1 tsp jaggery or dark sugar (optional) First up prep get all your ingredients out and ready to hand. Finely chop the onion. Heat 2 tbs oil in a pan, (I'm using coconut but use any oil that can cook at a high temp) Grab your whole spices, cardamom, cinnamon, dried chilli and cumin and add those to the pan, give it about 30 seconds for their oils to release, you’ll get a nice aroma from them and then throw in the onions. Stir and cover. Set a timer for 10 mins and leave on a low heat. You want the onions to become soft and translucent and slightly brown Next up toast the coconut dry in a frying pan on a medium heat, stir it about and keep vigilant as it'll turn quickly. When its a toasty medium brown colour take off the heat, I'd put it into a bowl so it stops cooking. Then chop the garlic and grate the ginger Once the onions look ready/ the timer is done throw the garlic/ginger mix in, stir and cover for a couple of minutes to allow the strong raw garlic smell to disappear. Then chuck in the coconut and also the ground almonds, coconut cream, some salt and pepper and blend the lot well. The sauce will be quite thick, don't worry as the spinach will thin it out. Put the pan or another one that’ll fit the spinach back on the heat and throw in the spinach, sauce and chickpeas. let that all cook down for around 5-7 minutes, if you're using baby spinach it’ll be less time.. the sauce should water down but still be fairly thick. Then finally add a teaspoon of garam masala and half tsp sweetener, stir cover and cook for a couple minutes et voila! If you feel like the consistency is too thick add more of the coconut milk but you shouldn't need to. Thanks and come again xx
Channel Trailer
Channel Trailer
3 years ago
Hi I'm Hersha a presenter and film-maker and I love cooking and comedy! I started making Indian food when I realised how rubbish I was at being Indian in general but found I was pretty good with the food part! Then I went and got very sick.... for almost three years I battled with debilitating chronic fatigue syndrome and at my lowest could not see the point in living. Thankfully through learning more about Indian Ayurvedic philosophies around food and overall mind/body health a whole new world of hippie wellness was revealed that impacted me and my family in the best ways. So in conclusion I now want to create the means not just to to share recipes but also wellbeing findings that have helped me and hopefully you will see some benefits.. at the very least after cooking something delicious your smug levels will be off the chain!
Gujarati Stuffed Aubergines | Grandma's Recipe | Cook with a little Indian |
Gujarati Stuffed Aubergines | Grandma's Recipe | Cook with a little Indian |
3 years ago
This week's recipe is one of the most special yet, it's from my Grandmother who lives a skillion miles away in a tiny village in the Gujarat in India. The house she lives in was built by my great grandparents, my mum was born in it and up until a few years ago all of the cooking was done over a fire and coals in the backyard. Nowadays not an awful lot has changed so it was really quite magical cooking with her in this tiny time capsule of a home. And although this was only the second time I'd seen her as a grown-up she was so loving and warm that it didn't feel at all awkward. This is making me feel all emotional now.. sob. This recipe I adapted a bit as I toast the peanuts and coconut before-hand so you don’t have to do that and it'll still be yum! RECIPE & METHOD serves 2 as a main or 4 as a side. 8 baby aubergines 30g Peanuts 30g Dessicated Coconut 30g Gram Flour 30g Onion or half small red 1 garlic clove 1 chilli 1 inch knob ginger ½ tsp cumin ½ tsp coriander 1 small tsp turmeric tsp salt handful coriander finely chopped will be about a tbs 5 tbs oil, i use veg, coconut, rapeseed Wash and slit aubergines from the base two thirds down towards the top four equal ways - so you end up with 8 equal sections of aubergine still attache to the top! Crush the peanuts so they end up in chunks (what you'd find in chunky peanut butter) Heat a frying pan and toast the nuts, shake them about a bit and as they are slightly browning add the coconut. Stir the mix about and keep on a medium to low heat. Once the coconut has browned and giving of a nice aroma take off the heat. Careful here as this will happen quite quickly! Bung in a bowl along with gram flour, cumin, coriander, turmeric and salt. Chop the garlic, chilli, coriander and into the bowl. Grate the onion and ginger into the bowl. Pour in 2 tbsp oil to make into a very thick paste, if its too dry and not sticking together enough add a tiny bit of water or a touch more oil. Stuff the aubergines with this filling so you get about a cm between each aubergine section. Heat the oil, pref in a rounded pan like a wok. Put them all in at the same time and cover and cook on very low heat for 30 mins turning every 5-7 mins. Keep the heat low as you want to the inside to cook evenly without the outside burning. If they seem to be drying out add a bit of water. You should end up with a slightly crisp browned on the outside and soft on the inside. Eat with a bit of yoghurt, raita, rice or chapati, or as part of a bigger meal with dal and curry. Thanks and hope you like it! xx
Gujerati Dhokla Recipe | Cook with a Little Indian
Gujerati Dhokla Recipe | Cook with a Little Indian
3 years ago
When I was young a fun family outing mostly revolved around buying food supplies .. lucky me. Ah it wasnt actually that bad as these day trips would either be to Indian shops in Leicester or London and would mostly involve my mum, sister and I scarpering off to the glitzy sari shops where Asha and I would roll about in all the fabrics and laugh at the ridiculous dummies and my mum would be shiftily trying to work out how to hide her new purchases from Dad. One of the highlights was congregating in shops like Sekonis or Bobbys to fill up on sweetmeats and all sorts of popular street food snacks traditionally found in India. Dhokla and chutney was one of them and that's what I'll be making today! What the heck are Khaman Dhokla?! They're basically steamed fluffy savoury bites which are really very good! They're made from chickpea flour so a decent source of protein and can either be left to ferment over night or cooked straight away. How do I eat them? I personally would say you should have a chutney or a sauce to go with them which can be as simple as whizzing up tomato, coriander and a bit of sugar and lemon. There are 2 chutney video on my playlist so you could try one of those. Or failing that ketchup! Ha! You can eat them any time of day and I've had them breakfast.. let the batter ferment over-night, or for lunch with a salad.. don't let the batter ferment. And my mum will often just serve them with a cup of tea as a snack. Are they easy to make at home? Yes! The only tricky bit is fashioning a steaming device but if you have a big pan you can stand a shallow tin in without getting water in then you'll be fine. Are there any weird ingredients in there? The only hard to find ingredient is fruit salt or Eno, which I actually found in my corner shop. I have also seen it sold online. If you cant get it then use baking powder which I have used and you get a slightly denser batter. Will they last? I would say they last a couple days but you really want to eat them as fresh as possible. Ingredients (fills 1 large 8" shallow cake tin or two smaller ones) 250g Gram/Chickpeak Flour 250ml Organic Yoghurt 2 tsp Ginger 2 Green Chilli 1 tsp Salt 1 tsp Sugar 2 tb lemon juice ½ tsp Turmeric 2 tsp Eno or 1 tsp Baking Powder Temper or Tadka 2/3 tbs oil 1 tsp Mustard Seeds 3 tbs Sesame Seeds 1.5 tsp Sugar or Jaggery 3 tbs Dessicated Coconout 2 Handfuls coriander chopped (around 20g) Tools Shallow cake tin or dhokla steaming pan Big pan that will fit the tin in and you can easily take in and out when hot. Something to stand the cake tin on inside the pan to protect it from getting wet. Method Sieve the flour into a bowl. Grate the ginger and chop the chillies. Add those to the bowl along with the sugar, salt, turmeric, yoghurt and lemon juice and add water and whisk until you get a thick batter-like consistency. Now you can either ferment in a warm place overnight (said to be better for digestion) or cook straight away. When you come to cook them.. Put the stand in the big pan and enough water so as not to cover the stand. Then add 2 tsp eno or1 tsp baking powder to the mixture and it should fluff up. (if using baking powder it may only do it a little) Grease the baking tin. Pour the batter into the tin (or tins) Once the big pot of water is simmering place the cake tin on your stand, cover and leave it for 20 minutes. Don't open the lid as you dont want to get water on the batter. After 20 minutes you should have a steamed cakes! Remove and let it cool and cut into squares. (if you have more batter repeat) The Tempering (do it whilst your batter cooks) Heat 2/3 tbs oil in a frying pan and pop the mustard seeds. Lower the heat and add the sesame seeds and let them brown. Then add the jaggery or sugar and take off the heat. Put all you Dhoklas into a big bowl and pour the sesame mix, sprinkle over coconut and coriander and serve with a nice chutney! Good luck and enjoy! xx
How to Make Ghee | Cook with A Little Indian
How to Make Ghee | Cook with A Little Indian
3 years ago
For this weeks vid I answer one of life's more pertinent questions.. How on earth does one make Ghee? And what, in fact, is Ghee? And why the heck should I even use Ghee? Ghee is clarified or purified butter that’s been used for aeons in India and is well worth making at home as it very easy and will happily last for months and months in ac cool dry cupboard. If prepared properly with grass fed cow butter, this pure fat is traditionally used for three purposes, cooking, religion (Hinduism) and medicine (Ayurveda). I can remember my mum using ghee to light diva’s or mini oil lamps over Diwali (and my brother and I almost causing a house fire by trying to set light to our murray mint wrappers) It's also said to contain vitamins A, D, E and K but thats no licence to start shovelling it in like there’s no tomorrow, as its also high in calories and fat so use it sparingly! Use as you would any cooking oil… dab onto chapatis, put a blob in rice, temper or fry spices before putting into dhal, general curries, flash frying or roasting veg etc etc… Tools & Method As much organic/grass fed unsalted butter as you want. A pan A sieve Thin tea towel or muslin Clean airtight jar Skimming device or spoon. Cut the butter into chunks or just thrown in whole and place on a low heat. The butter will start foaming and bubbling fairly vigourously. Skim away foam. You should be able to start seeing solid particles on the bottom of the pan - these are the milk solids. Keep things bubbling away and skimming until the bubbles die down and the solid bit start to darken a bit. Be careful not to let the milk solids burn. About 10-12 mins in - depending on how much butter you’re using - once the sound has dies down and you can see the liquid is clear and golden turn off the heat. Don't worry about removing all the foam. Allow to cool enough to handle. Place the cloth over the sieve flush into the bowl of the sieve and pour the cooled liquid through. Gather the ends of the cloth up and squeeze all the liquid out. Pour the Ghee into your jar and bobs your uncle!
Chickpea & Aubergine Easy Curry | How to Eat With Your Hands! | Cook with a Little Indian
Chickpea & Aubergine Easy Curry | How to Eat With Your Hands! | Cook with a Little Indian
3 years ago
It is often said that you can't teach an old Lord new tricks. I dont know any Lords so I wouldnt know. I do however happen to be acquainted with a Sir.. who is very proper in his ways and whom up until the time of filming had only ever eaten his food 'picnics aside' with the appropriate silverware. I was raised in a house of hand eaters and whilst as a child I found it embarrassing to reveal to my fork yielding peers my hidden skills, as an adult I can honestly say I'm very glad to have this custom in my somewhat meagre artillery of Indian-ness. To me, a curry genuinely tastes better when eaten with hands.. and a bit of light research reveals that its nothing to do with being too poor or uneducated but is about practising ancient spiritual beliefs and holistic health principles. For example, good flora is said to live on your fingers which when transferred to your mouth act in much the same way as one of those probiotics drinks or tablets! Sounds a bit rank but pretty amazing really! Annyway, I digress... Sir Nicholas 'Nicky' Mander, may be posh as old boots and love a napkin ring, but he's a jolly good sport so was well up for the challenge of eating with his hands on camera for our viewing pleasure! So todays Episode of 'Cook with a Little Indian' not only contains a deliciously simple recipe thats healthy and filling, but also is an instructional on how one ought to conduct oneself if one finds oneself in the company of a 'true' Indian at a meal time. Throw away your forks and get your RIGHT hands at the ready! Happy watching and cooking! RECIPE AND METHOD 400ml tin Chickpeas (or soaked & cooked equivalent) 400ml tin Coconut Milk 1 Medium/Small Aubergine 3tbs Flavourless Cooking Oil 1 Medium Red Onion 2 Cloves Garlic 1 inch Knob Ginger 1 tsp Cumin Seeds 1tsp Turmeric Powder 1ts p Coriander Powder 1tsp Garam Masala 1tsp Salt 1tbs Peanut Butter (no added sugar variety) 1tbsp Raw Apple Cider Vinegar 1 small tsp Jaggery or Brown sugar Finely chop 1 medium red onion Add 2 tablespoons of oil to a pan and get it nice and hot Add a tsp of cumin seeds and brown for 30 seconds. Then throw in the onions, stir, cover and let them sweat on a medium heat for around 10 minutes. Peel and chop 2 cloves of garlic. Peel and grate a 1 inch knob of ginger Keep an eye on your onions giving them a stir every now and then and once they're soft and translucent throw in the garlic and ginger. Cook on a medium/low heat for a couple of minutes to let the raw garlic smell die down. Then add a teaspoon of garam masala, coriander powder and turmeric Take the pan off the heat for a moment. Chop the aubergine to 2 inch squared sized and wang your pan back on the heat. If your pan is feeling a little dry add a little more oil and then throw in the aubergine and add a tsp of salt. Mix it really well and let if cook for a couple of minutes allowing the spices and oil to coat the aubergine well. Pour in a tin of coconut milk, a tbs of raw cider vinegar, a tbs peanut butter and a small teaspoon of sugar. Stir and bring to a boil then simmer untul the aubergine is done and sauce has thickened. Finally add the chickpeas, stir well, taste and add more salt if you need! I like this one with rice but chappati will work too, or a chunk of bread or just on its own.. if you do that you could add also spinach. Bon Ap and thanks so much for watching/reading/caring.. xxx
Chicken Curry with Emma Willis | Cook with a little Indian
Chicken Curry with Emma Willis | Cook with a little Indian
3 years ago
Have you ever met someone with a face so beautiful it made your eyes ache? Thats how I felt when I first met (mega TV Presenting babe) Emma Willis. Not just that but she was and still is, funny, kind, caring, successful, one of the lads, gets on with girls, loves her family blah blah blah bleurghghg... Whatevs! Emma may seem perfect in every way but let me tell she's not! To me someone who loves a takeaway curry is a massive weirdo (my husband included). Don't get me wrong, they can sometimes be great, but for me in general they fit into the McDonalds camp of food... Great in the moment but shortly followed with bitter regret and a stomach ache. Emma's favourite, the Pathia, nice in theory (especially on a hang over) but I found can be full of mostly sugar, colourings and other strange ingredients... one recipe included ketchup??!! Historically a Pathia comes from my ancestral region in India the Gujarat, so in order to keep a sense of pride for my people I took on the challenge to develop a delicious curry my family would approve of, that makes you feel good going in and coming out (errr) and most importantly one that a proper take-away loving family hailing from the curry capital Birmingham, would give the thumbs up to..... Watch and find out if the right honourable Queen and Princess of Pathia Catherine Griffith & Emma Willis thought of my effort.. eee! Enjoy! Ingredients (serves two) 550g chicken thighs on the bones, free-range organic 1/2 tsp turmeric 1/2 tsp chilli powder 1/2 tsp salt 2 medium red onions 3 tb cooking oil, I use raw coconut 2 green chillies 8 garlic cloves 5 medium tomatoes 1 tsp cumin powder 1 tsp coriander powder 1 tsp cumin seeds 50ml raw cider vinegar 2 tsp unrefined sugar/jaggery or dark sugar METHOD Step 1 Dice the chicken into bite sized pieces and keep bones. Marinate for half an hour or couple of hours in fridge in: half tsp turmeric half tsp chilli powder half teaspoon salt Step 2. Finely chop 2 green chilli, 6 garlics & 2 medium onions (do not mix with chilli/garlic) Step 3. Heat 2 tbs oil and get it nice and hot Fry garlic and chilli on a high heat for 30 seconds until garlic browns Immediately add the onions Set phone timer for 20 mins, lower heat to lowest cover and cook, stirring every few mins. Step 4. Chop up tomatoes. Once onions cooked add, 1tsp cumin powder & 1 coriander powder Cook for 30 seconds Then add toms AND BONES and increase the heat, cook vigorously with lid on for 40 mins. May stick a bit but scrape it as you go. Set timer for 40 mins. If you can leave it for next day this is a good idea, otherwise once its thickened to a paste leave to cool and blend if you want a smooth sauce or just leave to one side. Step 5. Finely slice 2 cloves garlic. In a pan heat 1 tb oil and add, 1 tsp cumin seeds and the garlic. Once garlic is browned, add chicken and cook for 3-4 mins on a medium heat to slightly brown Then add your tomato sauce and ¼ cup raw cider vinegar and 2 tsp jaggery Bring down heat and cover and cook for 30 mins.. or until chicken is done. Taste and adjust seasoning. Enjoy with basmati rice and a fresh salad or chappatis or naan or...
Spinach, Sweet Potato & Cashew Curry | Cook with a Little Indian at Downton Abbey
Spinach, Sweet Potato & Cashew Curry | Cook with a Little Indian at Downton Abbey
4 years ago
This recipe I created after experimenting with the ingredients and techniques I picked up in Kerala. I'm quite proud of it as it’s been tested out on many and all have enjoyed it and asked for the recipe.. even the two year old… It’s a really good meat free dish as the combination of nuts, potatoes and fried lentils gives it a good bite which can sometimes feel lacking in other veggie curries. Anyway I’ll stop bigging it up, I hope you enjoy making and eating it! The location I filmed at is the home of the Manders, my Godfamily-in-law! We’ve been going there since we first meet and we even got married there! The Manders are an incredible family full of the nicest warmest and welcoming people.. and loads of lovely darling screaming small people… who I try and avoid having to play with.. If you like the look of it, go and check it out at owlpen.com and book in for a lovely long weekend! Big love x RECIPE & METHOD Serves two as a side or 1 if mega hungry 2tbsp Oil (I use coconut) 1 tbsp lentils 2 tbsp broken cashews 1 tsp cumin seeds 2 medium sized shallots (or a small red onion if you cant get) 1 Clove garlic Same sized piece of ginger 1 chilli (red is spicier) 1 tsp turmeric 1 tsp garam masala 1 medium sized sweet potato (150g) 200ml creamed coconut (the top thick part of a 400ml tin) 50g/2 handfuls of spinach squeeze of lemon salt to taste First up heat the oil in a large frying pan on a medium/high heat. Roughly chop the cashews if not already broken. Add the lentils, cashews and cumin to the pan and stray fry until they browned and the cumin smell all toasty. Turn down the heat or if turn it off.. you dont want to burn the items whilst you do the next bit! Finely chop or if you can blend the onion, garlic, chilli and ginger until you get a paste. Wang the heat back on to medium/high and throw that into the pan and stir fry for a minute. Turn the heat down and let it cook for around 6/7 minutes with a lid on giving it a couple of stirs along the way. Peel and chop your sweet potato to around 1.5cm square, I do them small so they cook quicker, but if you like big chunks go for it, you’ll just need to cook for longer and may need to add some water if it dries out. Once your onions are done add the turmeric and garam masala and stir for around a minute to let the oils release, careful not to let it burn. Add the sweet potato and stir fry that for a couple of minutes, it might start sticking a bit so scrape as you go. I like to do this part to brown the potatoes a bit. Then add coconut milk, stir, cover and simmer on a medium/high heat for around 20 mins until the potato is soft. Once you’re potato is cooked, if you have quite a watery sauce then remove the lid, wang up the heat and give it a good blast. You want a thick creamy consistency and you will also be adding spinach which will release liquid. Throw in the spinach wang the lid back in on for a couple minutes and once its wilted down give it a stir. Finally a squeeze of lemon, start with a half teaspoon of salt then taste and add more of both if you want. I serve it with basmati rice but it'll go great with a piece of grilled fish, or meat, as part of a thali of other curries or just on its own! Enjoy xx
Best Ever Easy Chicken Curry Recipe | Cook with a Little Indian
Best Ever Easy Chicken Curry Recipe | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
When it comes to making curries, there are a million ways of doing a chicken one. This one I boldly claim is so great because not only is it actually delicious but there are very little ingredients in it so it’s a great simple one to throw out there when you have a hankering for a meat curry but can’t face too much complication. The key things to go by are to use meat on the bone (flavour and nutrients), have a bit of patience with cooking the onions and tomatoes and also getting the best ingredients you can afford… get the very best tomatoes you can find and free-range organic chicken.. thighs and legs are generally much cheaper than breast. If you wanted to beef it out you could add a medium potato, chopped into large chunks, 20 mins before the end. RECIPE & METHOD serves 4 900g chicken thighs and also breast if you want (try and use free-range organic, thighs are much cheaper) 300g or 2 medium/large onions 1 inch knob ginger 3 tbsp cooking oil - I used coconut but sunflower/olive/veg or your choice. 4 small green chillies 15g or 4 medium/large cloves garlic 500g or 5 medium tomatoes, very best you can buy 1 tbsp tomato puree 2 tsp salt 1 large tsp garam masala First up finely dice the onion and ginger. Heat a pan under a medium heat with three tbsn oil and throw in the onions and ginger so the pan sizzles and they fry. Give them a good stir, bring the heat down to a low heat and bung the lid on. Cook them for 20/25 mins stirring every five minutes or so, until they are caramelized and sweet smelling. Don’t rush this part! Whilst all thats cooking finely chop the chilli and garlic and chop up the tomatoes. Throw the chilli/garlic in the pan and let that cook for a few minutes until the raw smell of the garlic dies down. Then in go tomatoes along with salt and tomato puree. Give it a good stir, bring the heat up to medium and let that cook down for another 20 mins. What you want to end up with is a thick, dark, luscious consistency. Dice up chicken breast if you have that and throw the chicken into the pan, give it a stir and let that cook on a medium heat/high heat.. you dont want it to burn or dry out but be cooking fairly vigorously for a good 20/25 mins until you get a thick rich stew and the chicken is cooked. Then finally add 1 large tsp of garam masala stir and cook for 5 minutes and bobs you uncle! Serve with cucumber raita, chappatis or basmati rice or if you’re going light a grated veg salad or stir fried cabbage or whatever you want! Lastly just want to say thanks so much to Captain Danny for steering so gallantly across the rough waters of Camden Lock and Willie Borrels for allowing us aboard his Vestel Floating Bar-ge. (its an actual real bar on a barge at camden lock check out Vestal Voyages) Thanks and enjoy xx
Coconut Mussels Quick and Easy | Cook with a Little Indian
Coconut Mussels Quick and Easy | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
I made this up a few weeks ago and have tested it out on four groups of extremely satisfied friends, including a 5 year old who ate all hers... and mine… and Johnos.. hmm. I love this dish as it's so quick and easy but tastes like you’ve somehow put more effort in. The few spices you put in subtly flavour the coconut milk and then the sea taste of the Mussels mixed into that is just winner! I usually serve them with some warm bread, a bowl a crunchy salad leaves, and a side of new potatoes tossed in toasted cumin seeds, chilli flakes, a squeeze of lemon and butter… or just olive oil, salt & pepper if that feels too much! RECIPE & METHOD (serves 2) Ingredients 1kilo fresh mussels cleaned 400ml home-made or 1 tin/carton of thick coconut milk (check the water/coconut ratio.. some have loads of water in, you want as little added water and as little chemicals as possible) 1 inch knob fresh ginger 1 inch knob fresh turmeric or 1/4 tsp powdered (Fresh turmeric I've found is becoming more easily available so worth a shot trying to get it) 1 green chilli 1 star anise Big handful of dry, or a stalks of fresh, curry leaves 1/4 tsp black pepper A handful of coriander stalks & leaves seperated Squeeze of lime (1tbsp) Method First up scrub your mussels, scrape off any barnacles, pull out beards and give them a rinse. Any that are open give them a tap, if they stay open then chuck them. Put a large pan onto a medium/high heat and chuck in the coconut milk. Grate the ginger and turmeric, chop the chilli and chop the coriander stalks finely. Add all of that along with the star anise, black pepper, curry leaves, and a squeeze of lime. Bring it to a boil and let it simmer for 5 minutes with a lid on. Then throw in the mussels, let them cook on a high heat for 3-5 minutes until they all open up.. any that don’t open discard. Have a quick taste of the broth and add more lime if you want. Serve in a bowl with a load of the broth poured over, sprinkle on chopped coriander and enjoy with a chilled glass of something boozy.. wahey! Thanks for watching, happy cooking! Hersh xxx
How to Crack a Coconut in 5 Seconds! | The Little Indians Quick Tips
How to Crack a Coconut in 5 Seconds! | The Little Indians Quick Tips
4 years ago
Until recently I ignored actual coconuts in favour of tinned... who can be arsed to go through the rigmarole of it? Turns out, I can be arsed and it is in fact not even much of a rigmarole. Step one involves cracking which is actually well easy and satisfying.. I have no tools so this is how I do it.. make sure you have a non tiled surface.. ie go outside if you have a nice floor that has cracking potential and put some wellie into it! As well as making milk or shredding it for cooking, you can just eat it! It freezes really well too. Coming next week.. how to make the cream/milk! BUT HOW DO KNOW WHAT NUT IS A GOOD NUT?? When selecting a coconut give it a shake about and make sure you can hear water inside.. this means it's younger and will be easier to break the flesh away from the nut. Make sure the nut is dry and brown on the outside and the three eyes (at one end) aren't damp or mouldy. Ideally you want a newly delivered one, not one thats been sitting around for ages. This nut cost 60p and I made a tins worth of milk from it.. coming soon, how to make milk.
Easy Chapati Recipe and Method  | Cook with a Little Indian
Easy Chapati Recipe and Method | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
Roll rubbish chapatis and you will die alone! Was my mother's sage advice growing up. I can roll a good round one and I own a man.. so maybe the oracle was right. Or maybe she’s just a massive weirdo. Chapatis, if you're not au fait with them, are one of those things that seem way more complicated than they actually are. They are in fact stupidly easy and quick.. a couple ingredients, a bit of kneading and rolling and bobs your uncle! This is great if you have all the right tools but I often find myself in random kitchens with not the right things, so today I’m going to show you how to make them if you have no rolling pin, tawa or the right flour! And as for the rolling method? I’ll show you my mums full proof way which Johno (cameraman and my actual man) tried out and succeeded and he hates cooking. Thanks and enjoy!! xx By the way I’m not knocking the right tools, theres a good reason for them and they will result in a far superior bread but sometimes one has to make do or try it out before investing in more crap for the kitchen. And in case you’re wondering… Atta flour Indian hard wheat, very finely milled to suit rolling thin breads. There are different types, I use chakki atta, which is 100% wholewheat. Tawa is a special flat pan that’s used to make flatbread. Chapati press a really cool looking thing used to press when chapatis are on the the pan. Rolling pin if this is a question then you should probably go away now. RECIPE & METHOD (makes around 7) 200g Atta Flour (Chakki if possible) OR 100g Plain & 100g wholemeal OR bugger it and use anything you have! A small bowl of flour for dusting 1.5 tbsn oil, veg or olive Around a tbspn or two of butter, ghee or coconut oil Hot water Salt Tools Tawa Or Any flat pan, cast iron or just regular frying pan Rolling pin OR A long bottle A chapati Press OR a teatowl/kitchen roll A chapati box OR a vessel to keep chapatis warm and out of air METHOD Combine all the ingredient apart from the water into a medium/large bowl. Using a large spoon or fork slowly pour on the water, mixing whilst you go. Once the flour starts to stick together into a clump then dive in with your hands and start kneading. At this point only add very very tiny bits of water. Knead the dough until you get a soft and pliable lump thats not sticky. The timing will vary depending on the type of flour you’re using. Ideally cover and leave to rest for 30 mins. Roll a load of balls to about the size of pingpongs, wang your cooking vessel onto a low heat. Grab a ball press it flat and if it feels sticky dip it in the flour. Watch the vid to see the rolling method.. or if you don’t care just roll it flat into whatever shape comes out, getting it to around 2mm thickness. Make sure your pan is really hot and fling on the chapati, let it cook for around 30” or until bubbles start to appear. Then turn and leave for a bit longer until that side is cooked, dark brown spots appear. Brush some butter or oil onto the half cooked side flip and gently press the chapati. It should start to puff up and the steam inside will finish off the cooking, make sure there are no raw looking bits on either side, press those parts if so. Remove, place it in your container and roll and repeat! Eat them warm.. break off small pieces to shovel a load of curry into your gob. Yum! Good luck, have fun, happy rolling and thanks! x
How to Fry a Poppadom | Cook with a Little Indian | Quick Tips!
How to Fry a Poppadom | Cook with a Little Indian | Quick Tips!
4 years ago
Cheap and easy and fun to make! (how lame do I sound?!) Its only a poppadom I know but when you cannot be bothered to cook a proper starter then a pimped up poppadom is good shout. I made these the other day for my friends (before actual real food) and they went down really well. Serve them hot with a homemade chutney (two recipes on the channel) or just throw in a few lime wedges, or some shop bought mango pickle... These ones have rice flour in them so they go a bit more foamy than the standard thin ones and are only good deep friend. They really are SO good though! I served mine with some lime wedges and a home-made coriander For the healthier option, you can also get ones you just toast on a flame or grill which are also really good. God bless the Popadom!
Trailer for Keralan Fish in Banana Leaf  | Cook with a Little Indian
Trailer for Keralan Fish in Banana Leaf | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
A little taster of the Banana Leaf episode shot in Kerala. Available now!
Spicy Scrambled Eggs | Cook with a little Indian
Spicy Scrambled Eggs | Cook with a little Indian
4 years ago
Throughout my lifetime my folks have attempted to currify anything they could lay their hands on.. baked beans, sunday roast, lasagna (?!?!) and the humble egg. This is no a bad thing, as they all (aside from the lasagne which is just wrongness) are well tasty. Why do you think Heinz have a curry flavoured bean in their repertoire? So in homage to my folks’ wily ways with spices, this week’s recipe is the Patel eggs one. It’s a quick way to get a deliciously simple spicy meal using some basic spicy items. When I’m hung-over, and can be arsed to cook, I make this for Johno and I along with with mama’s spicy Baked Beans. RECIPE & METHOD (Serves 2) 4 Eggs - free-range organic pleeeeease! 1/2 an onion 1 medium tomato or 4 cherry 1 red chilli (green if not) pinch turmeric small 1/2 tsp garam masala salt chopped coriander to garnish (optional) Finely chop the onion and fry in a tbsp oil until the onions are translucent and starting to brown. Whilst the onion cooks chop the tomatoes and finely chop the chilli. Once the onions are to your satisfaction (make sure you have a lowish heat) add the turmeric and garam masala. Give it a stir & after 30 seconds add the chilli, give it stir again and then chuck in the toms. Add a pinch of salt. Let that cook for around 3-5 mins on a low/medium heat, the toms should start breaking down only a bit and you don’t want the mix to dry out but take on a curry/masala like consistency. Then crack the eggs straight into the pan and scramble until the eggs reach your desired consistency. Done! I like to eat this with fresh sourdough which I buy at the E5 bakehouse in Hackney… And if I’m trying to be impressive I also make the coriander chutney (on my channel) Hope you like it, thanks parents for the recipe xx
Coconut Fish Curry by and Authentic Keralan Chef | Cook with Little Indian
Coconut Fish Curry by and Authentic Keralan Chef | Cook with Little Indian
4 years ago
Before I try and cook this one myself for you I wanted to share the recipe straight from the horses mouth.. The horse being Oceanos restaurant in Fort Kochi, and the mouth being Bennie the Head Chef. He very kindly let me barge into his kitchen and graciously obeyed my demand to share his Grandmothers secret recipe for Mathi/Challa Pollichathu otherwise known as Sardines in banana leaf.. possibly one of the best things I've ever put in my mouth. Sardines are used here as they are local and sustainable in the area so its worth trying to use the equivalent where you live. Recipe (serves 1 with rice and chutney) around 4 tbsp coconut oil 4 fresh sardines 1.5 tsp turmeric 1 tsp salt 2 tsp fresh ground black pepper 2 stalks & 10 loose fresh curry leaves 1 inch knob ginger 6 whole and 4 sliced shallots 1 green chilli the grated flesh of a coconut (or a tin of coconut milk) 3 garlic cloves or 1 tsp crushed juice of half a lime 1 tbsp vinegar (rice, wine or coconut) 2 A4 sized pieces of banana leaf ideally a heavy cast iron pan
Authentic Samosa Recipe | The Full Recipe | Cook with a Little Indian
Authentic Samosa Recipe | The Full Recipe | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
Samosas, taste great, take a bit of time and technique to make. But if you like cooking and want to feel a little bit technically masterful then, grab a drink, bung on some tunes and dive into this one as it's well worth the effort! For kids leave out the chilli and ginger. I have yet to test out oven-baked but read that if you brush them with oil and bake at 180 for around half an hour you get a pretty decent healthier version (I will be trying and getting back on this though) There are all sorts of fillings out there so if you're not feeling the pea and potato, which is the traditional one, then you could use the video for the pastry, filling and cooking method. (Act 1 & 3 in the film). I've written you the recipe below but I cant out the method in as youtube wont let me. PM if you want it! x Recipe The Dough 200g plain flour 1.5 tbsp lemon juice 3 tbsp oil warm water salt plus oil for deep frying The Filling 2 medium potatoes or 4 small 100g frozen peas (or fresh) 1 red onion 1 tbsp chopped coriander leaves (optional) 1 green or red chilli (if kids are involved in the eating leave this out) 1 inch knob ginger 1 garlic clove 1 tsp cumin seeds 1 tsp mustard seeds ½ tsp turmeric powder ½ tsp cumin powder wedges of lemon to serve Have a few clean tea-towels or kitchen roll handy.
How to Make Samosa Pastry | Cook with a Little Indian
How to Make Samosa Pastry | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
I've split this weeks recipe into two parts, tomorrow will show how to do the filling and today its the pastry. This way if you want to use readymade then skip to the part 2 video for filling and cooking and if you want a different type of filling then use 1!
Teaser | Traditional Homestyle Samosa Recipe | Cook with a Little Indian
Teaser | Traditional Homestyle Samosa Recipe | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
This weeks vid is split into two parts, the first shows how to make the dough and the second will be filling and cooking, which will be up tomorrow! This way if you want to use ready made dough you can just look up video two and if you want to use a different filling recipe then just use part 1 to make your own dough!
Spinach Curry - Saag Aloo | Cook with a Little Indian
Spinach Curry - Saag Aloo | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
A friend of mine recently informed me that he never invites his two vegan friends to his dinner parties as he has no clue what to make. I think thats a lie, I think he just doesn’t like these so called ‘friends’ and is using their veganism as a convenient means to begin de-friending them. Anyway.. vegan or not, this week's recipe is first and foremost just really good tasting and satisfying, with the added bonus that it’s friendly for a big range of diets. I’ve tried and tested loads of spinach curry or saag aloo recipes and have adapting them into two winners! Todays recipe is the creamier more mild one. Happy cooking, I hope it tastes good for you! Love Hersh x And yeah yeah it wasn’t filmed in my Hackney Kitchen.. the location is Chamonix France incase you cared.. RECIPE AND METHOD 3/4 tbspn oil - I use raw virgin coconut 400g spinach thoroughly washed (old or baby will do, I prefer baby) 1 large red onion 2 medium or 4 small potatoes 1 chill (red or green) 1 clove of garlic 1 inch knob ginger 1 tspn mustard seeds 1 tspn cumin seeds 1 tspn turmeric 2 tspn garam masala 100/200ml coconut cream (not milk, thats just cream with water added) salt to taste bit of water Dice the onion very small, peel and crush the garlic, grate the ginger and chop the chilli. Heat a saucepan, add 2 tbspn oil and when the oil becomes very hot add the cumin and mustard seeds and allow them to pop. Reduce to a medium heat once the popping dies down (about 10/15 seconds) throw in the the onion, give it a stir and then add the ginger, garlic, chilli. Cook on a medium to low heat, keeping an eye and stirring every now and then. This will take around 15 minutes to get nice and caramelised and browned. (If you're not keen on multitasking then complete this stage first and turn the heat off. Otherwise continue whilst keeping an eye on the onions.) Bung a saucepan of water on to boil. Peel and dice the potatoes to around 1 inch sized cubes and wang those in the saucepan of boiling water. Cook until tender but not mushy, you should be able to slide a knife through easily. This should take around 10/15 minutes. Once cooked drain and leave to one side. If the onions are done then raise the heat and add a splash more oil. Throw in the potatoes and give them a good mix. You want to cook these for a good 10/15 mins till they start to brown, every time they start sticking put a tiny bit of water to just deglaze, not making a soupy mess. (once again if you are against multi-tasking then hold your horses here, finish the potatoes and turn off the heat) Otherwise…. Whilst the potato melange does its thing, heat a half cm layer of water in a medium/large pan. (Keeping an eye on the pots) When its boiling shove in all the spinach, put a lid on and let in all wilt down, this should take a minute or two.. if it's baby spinach it’ll be quicker. Then take off the heat, drain off the liquid and squizzle up, with a hand whizzer or blender, to a smooth consistency Grab your potato spice mix and pour in all the spinach and mix about on a low heat. The the coconut, I like to add around 150ml but this is really personal preference, I'd add a couple tablespoons first, season with salt, taste and if you want more then go wild. Remove from the heat and it's good to go if you want it immediately or is also good left for a while. Enjoy and good work and hope you manage to find some chump to do all that washing up, haha! x
Cook with a Little Indian | Spinach Curry Trailer | Help a Vegan
Cook with a Little Indian | Spinach Curry Trailer | Help a Vegan
4 years ago
Yes I promised an episode every Thursday but I'm all ill and can barely lift my poor fingers to type this.. sob I'll be posting the recipe very soon and in the meantime here's a trailer to whet your appetite. This short film will hopefully highlight the plight of many people who walk among us today. All you have to do is subscribe to the channel and you too could help these wretched people.
Easy Mint Coconut Chutney | Cook with a Little Indian
Easy Mint Coconut Chutney | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
This week we're back in Hackers for another super quick and simple no cook chutney. This one is really great with a dal or the smoky aubergine curry. Combine that with the rice and pakora to start, throw in some chilli/passionfruit martinis to get things going and you have yourselves an Indiany themed dinner party! In an ideal world I'd be all, 'use fresh coconut man, it's so much better.' - particularly after recently being in Kerala, where coconut use seems to be as normal as breathing - but most of you aren't lucky enough to be hanging around in God Own Country or similar, so grab your pre-packaged blocks, 5 minutes of your time and voila.. RECIPE AND METHOD 25g or two handfuls of mint leaves (not stalks, use those for tea) 100g or half a creamed coconut block 2 medium tomatoes 1 red chilli pinch of salt splash of water Bung it all in a blender and whizz up! The consistency should be quite thick or as you like it really, and if you like it mega coconuty then just use the whole block and add more water. Thanks and see you soon! x
Prawn Curry (Masala) | Cook with a Little Indian | The Little Indian in India
Prawn Curry (Masala) | Cook with a Little Indian | The Little Indian in India
4 years ago
William (Willy) works as the chef at the Secret Garden hotel in mega nice Fort Cochi, a great spot for a bit of down time after schlepping around in the heat (my sweaty face was real sweat after 10 minutes in the sun.. nice) So far I’ve cooked a shed load of vegetarian south indian dishes, from dosa to thorans, veg stews and beyond and because the seafood is local and fresh I thought it was a good chance to learn how the Keralans do seafood - bloody good is how they do it. This recipe was the first thing I ate in Fort Cochi and I thought it’d be a good one to share as it's quick to make and doesn’t have any wacky ingredients or cooking methods (Next week I'm hoping to spy on a proper banana leaf wrapped fish...) Happy cooking and if you dont like it blame Willy!! ha ha RECIPE & METHOD 4 massive prawns or around 16 small tiger, head on if possible 1 tbsn oil 4 cloves garlic 1 inch knob ginger 1.5 small red onion 1 small tomato 1/4 green pepper small handful coriander 1 tsp coriander powder 1/2 tsp chilli powder 1 tsp garam masala 1/2 tsp turmeric salt to taste water Wash and, remove shell and devein the prawns Heat oil in a cast iron kadai if you have or any old pan if not, oh a wok I'm sure would be good. Slice the onion and throw into pan. Chop ginger/garlic finely and leave in pile. Chop up the tomato, pepper and coriander. Add the prawns to the pan and stir fry for a couple minutes. Whilst they are still a bit grey looking add the garlic/ginger mix and stir for two mins. Then add all the dry spices (I’d leave the salt until later) and stir fry for 1/2 mins until the smell is fragrant. Then add the tomato/pepper/coriander/salt and stir fry for 2 mins until it starts to dry out and you're scraping the pan. Pour on about 150ml water, stir and scrape all the stuck on bits, cover with a lid and leave to simmer vigorously for around 5 minutes to allow the consistency to thicken down. Taste, adjust seasoning and eat with freshly made basmati rice. (basmati method video on the channel) Keralans love a bit of lime pickle so that’d go well too! Bon Ap xx ps thanks again to the crew at the Secret Garden www.secretgarden.in
Trailer | How to Cook A Keralan Prawn Curry | Cook with a Little Indian, The little Indian in India
Trailer | How to Cook A Keralan Prawn Curry | Cook with a Little Indian, The little Indian in India
4 years ago
A little teaser for the upcoming episode I filmed in Kerala - Prawns Big Willi-am Style!
A Super Quick Mega Coriander Chutney | Cook with a Little Indian
A Super Quick Mega Coriander Chutney | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
This week's recipe is a quick, tasty and multi-use chutney that goes with a ton of stuff, requires NO cooking and can really transform a meal from a bit dull to a bit dull-icous (sorry that was terrible). I've opted for this one as it's one my dad makes a lot and he loves it with his special BBQ ribs and chicken. I felt I should give him some props as he's been feeling a bit left out of late, all this chat about my mother this and my mother that.. Actually I think the reason why I love cooking so much is also down to him. When we were little the only TV shows he really watched were nature programmes and cooking shows (and The Fresh Prince of Bel Air?!). The rest of the time he was working incessantly like a good Indian father. So inevitably I ended up spending quals time with him in the presence of most TV chefs from Madhur Jaffrey to that guy with the fat tongue. I’ve also made this millions of times for friends, serving with pakora, tortillas, dal, eggs, avocado etc etc.. and its the lads who really seem to love it (not that girls don’t, they do, I’m not being sexist.. arg!) Hope you like it! RECIPE & METHOD 25g Coriander OR 2 large handfuls 2 medium tomatoes OR 8 cherry tomatoes (the best you can afford) A quarter lemon juiced 1 red chilli (or green for milder) 1 tsp Sugar (I use brown or coconut) A pinch of salt 2 tbsp water Put everything in a blender with a 2 tbsn water and whizz up! Don’t blend too much, so if you have a fancy fast one pulse it until its all blended together and stop. If its not breaking down the just add a touch more water. Taste and adjust salt, sugar, lemon to your liking. Eat straight away or bung in the fridge - its only really good on the day or the next day at a stretch Thanks for reading and watching! x
Pakoras | Cook with a Little Indian | Hersha's Hackney Kitchen
Pakoras | Cook with a Little Indian | Hersha's Hackney Kitchen
4 years ago
A wise person once said.. If in doubt deep fry the sh*t out of it. That person was me. Cauliflower pakoras (or bhajias) are a true delight in my book, crispy, lightly spiced, hot and moreish. I’ve tried and tested this method in a bid to achieve a crisp batter and have adapted my mums recipe mainly by using rice flour and baking powder. She (old school) makes her’s only with Gram Flour and if this is all you have then just use that as your overall flour weight, with a squeeze of quarter of a lemon in the place of baking powder, and it’ll still taste mega good. As my mum did and still does, I don’t make Pakora as a casual weekday dinner accompaniment but more a dinner party treat. They’ve always gone down really well with everyone, even back when I was making soggy ones (pity eating is acceptable too) and they're an enticing means of getting people to crowd around the same area and start mingling (mingling?!) I use cauliflower, but my mum does hers with potato, aubergine and the nations favourite - an onion! And let’s be honest, you could pretty much deep fry anything and it would taste good, so whether you under cook or overcook or make them soggier than you really want, these will be a winner. RECIPE & METHOD 1 small cauliflower or half a large (or if you want to use a whole large then double the recipe below) 150g gram flour 2tbsp rice four 1 chilli 1 garlic clove 1 inch knob of ginger 1 tsp garam masala 1/4 tsp turmeric 6/7 fresh or dry curry leaves 1 tsp baking powder 1/4 tsp carom seeds (not essential but good for digestion of oily food and apparently your libido too?!?!?) 1 or 2 tsp salt (I’m never sure so I taste the batter, this may taste a bit rank but I like to know the seasoning) Chop up the cauliflower into small florets about 2 inch in size and leave to one side. Bung all the ingredients into a large bowl and then using a fork or whisk add water very slowly until you get a thick tooth pasty consistency. With the seasoning, I taste the raw batter and adjust but if you aren’t keen then just wang in one teaspoon of salt and then once cooked you can always sprinkle over some extra. Throw in the cauliflower and combine, it should coat all of it well. If you feel like its not covering it evenly then add a teeny bit more water to stop it from glooping into lumps. If you have time, leave it for 15 to 20 mins but its not essential. Get the oil hot and test it out by putting in one floret, cook until its golden brown and then try it. If the cauli is just very slightly undercooked the oil is ready i.e. when you put a load in the temperature of the oil will come down a bit and you should end up with pakora that are golden dark brown on the outside and cooked in the middle. Fry the pakora in one layer batches so they cook evenly, this should be around 2mins but its better to judge this yourself from the pre testing and colouring of the florets. When they’re looking done, remove and shake off the oil, decant onto a tissue paper if you want or if they feel dry enough bung them straight onto a shallow serving dish. Serve with a chutney of your choice, or a squeeze of lime, or ketchup, or sweet chilli sauce , or salad cream, or mint sauce, or mayo, or bbq sauce…. As always this recipe is one way of doing it, please please do comment if you have any tips on your way or another way! Thanks for reading trying, I hope it works and subscribe for more! Hersh xx
Basmati Rice | Hersha Patel
Basmati Rice | Hersha Patel
4 years ago
My good friend Liz recently informed me that she still successfully implements my mother's rice method I taught her back in the day, (a few years ago). My ma was very pleased to hear this, 'but who's Liz?' she asked.. I've only known her twenty years.. For as long as I can remember Basmati Rice was something my mum cooked perfectly and I avoided… "Brown rice is so much healthier!” I’d sagely profess. What I really meant was, it’s just easier to cook, boil it until it's done, it never goes mushy! But once I committed to learning to cook Basmati Rice properly I now no longer avoid the sad packet lurking awkwardly in the back of the cupboard. And yes it may be healthier to cook brown rice but a proper curry just tastes so good piled on top of (or next to) a load of steaming buttery white rice, all homely and yum. It may take a couple of goes but you will get it and then, like me (and Liz), you'll feel pretty smug. (Though there are times when I still get it a bit mushy, like when I'm cooking for more than 12 people… #showoff.) Also if you don't want to have a meaty meal then you can eat rice with lentils - I've been well informed that it makes a complete protein. Ingredients 60g or a couple hand-fulls of Basmati rice (per person) Water Salt (pinch per person) Knob of butter (if you want) Method Tip - if you soak it and rinse for at least 30 mins or over night the rice will be lass starchy and stick together less. This method is one part rice and two parts water. So whatever amount of rice you use, you'll need twice the amount of water. Step by step, this is how I do it... Put the rice in a cup or small bowl so it fills it completely. Bung that in the pan and wash and rinse the rice a few times and drain off all the water. Grab the cup/bowl and fill it with water to the top, pour that water in the pan and then do the same again (so it ends up twice as much water as rice!). Add the salt and butter and give it a quick stir about. Put the pan on a medium to high heat and bring it to a boil. Then put a lid over it leaving a small hole to allow the steam to escape. Turn the heat down to a simmer and leave it to cook until the water has almost all gone and the rice is still slightly uncooked, this usually is around 7-10 mins. At this stage, turn the heat off, and give it a very gentle stir once with a fork, then cover completely so no steam can escape. Leave for around 5 minutes and then have a look! Hopefully it should be all fluffy and delicate but if its all mushed and stuck together, don't worry, just cover it with loads of curry and artfully sprinkled coriander and bobs your uncle! This is my (mums) way but you might have a better way, do share if you do. Cheers xx
How to Cook A Perfect Basmati Rice | Teaser | Cook with a Little Indian
How to Cook A Perfect Basmati Rice | Teaser | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
Basmati Rice can be an Arse to cook, so in tomorrows episode I show you the way my ma taught me and she is the queen of the white grain! Up tomorrow Thursday 18th Feb!! 1pmEST 6pmUKT 7pmCET
How to Cook A Smoky Aubergine Curry | Teaser | Full Ep out now!
How to Cook A Smoky Aubergine Curry | Teaser | Full Ep out now!
4 years ago
Heres a little taster of the next instalment.. how to slay a couple of unsuspecting Aubergines and turn them into a yumalicious curry. Up tomorrow Thursday 11th Feb!! 1pmEST 6pmUKT 7pmCET
How to Cook A Most Delicious Dal | Teaser | Full Episode out now!
How to Cook A Most Delicious Dal | Teaser | Full Episode out now!
4 years ago
Heres a little taster of the first cooking vid. Up tomorrow Thursday 4th Feb!! 1pmEST 6pmUKT 7pmCET
Easy Dal | Cook with a Little Indian
Easy Dal | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
Dal is an absolute fave of mine and the first and only Indian thing I cooked for a good few years. It has a really lovely flavour without being mega spicy so I can cook it for pretty much anyone. I like it so much I even cooked a massive vat of it at my wedding (#budgetwedding). My ma, however is a bit peeved as the recipe is a) not hers and b) not even Indian, I learnt it in Sri Lanka! Like with most curries, it's good eaten straight away but I find the slower and longer you cook it the better it is. My folks and an ayuervedic teacher informed me that eating lentils with rice means you get a complete protein, in other words, a pretty decent meat -free meal. Once you have the spices and lentils, they’ll keep for months on end so you can make it easily with just a couple of fresh ingredients. Recipe & Method - Serves two with rice. 150g red lentils 1/2 creamed coconut block OR 1/2 tin coconut milk 1 small tomato OR 2 cherry tomatoes 4 garlic cloves 1 and a half red onions tbsp oil for frying 15 dry or fresh curry leaves 1 tsp chilli powder 1/4 tsp turmeric 1/4 tsp black peppercorns 2 tsp garam masala (I used East End Madras) 1 cinnamon stick 1 tsp mustard seeds 1 tsp cumin seeds salt to taste coriander to finish if you want Prep the lentils as per your packet (some need soaking overnight) which I do anyway... if I can remember. Rinse the lentils until the water runs clear and put them in a saucepan along with half a finely diced onion, chopped tomato, coconut, the garlic chopped finely, 10 curry leaves, chilli powder, garam masala, turmeric powder, peppercorns and cinnamon stick. Pour in 400ml water (size of of a tin can) DO NOT ADD SALT! Wang that on a medium heat, bring to the boil and simmer for around 25/30 mins. Depending on the consistency you like your dal keep adding enough water as it dries out. I like a bit of soupiness. Whilst that’s doing its thing, grab a frying pan, get the oil very hot and add the cumin and mustard seeds. Let them pop a bit and then throw in a finely sliced onion and the rest of the curry leaves. Stir-fry constantly until the onions are dark brown. Once the Dal is done add the fried mix, stir through, add some salt, taste it and adjust the seasoning. I like to leave it cooking on a very low temperature for longer but you can eat it right then. Yummington. ps how do you even spell dhal?! Dal, Daaaal, Daaal..?
Aubergine Curry Smoky and Delicious | Cook with a Little Indian
Aubergine Curry Smoky and Delicious | Cook with a Little Indian
4 years ago
"I cant believe how easy it was to make.. Luca absolutely loved it!” - Katie Fuller (unsure kitchen lurker/taste-tester). When I was little I loved the smell of an aubergine being flame-grilled to death by my mother... that and cola cubes. Nowadays cola cubes have been replaced with hard liquor but the love of a torched aubergine remains. So this method I have taken and adapted into a smokin' hot curry that is a bloody winner. Well I think so, but just to be sure I roped in my mate Katie to try it out with strict instructions to be honest. Recipe & Method - Serves two with rice. 2 aubergines 1 red onion 1 dried chilli crumbled 8 green cardamom pods 2 tbsp coriander seeds 1 tsp black peppercorns 1 tsp turmeric 3 garlic cloves finely chopped 1 green chilli 1 inch knob of ginger salt to taste 500g tomatoes, fresh is better but tin if not 1/2 tin coconut milk (less water content the better) bit of oil Put one aubergine straight onto one of your cooker rings with the heat cranked up, I have done this on a gas, electric cooker, and a fire-place! Turn occasionally and leave to cook until the whole thing is blackened and charred evenly, and soft inside. If you don’t want to do that then place them under a very hot grill. Once it’s cooled remove all the burnt skin and chop the insides into big chunks. Dice the other aubergine to around 2-inch size cubes, cover in a couple tbsp oil and throw into the oven at 180/350 for around 20/25 mins or until golden brown and cooked. Add a couple of tbsp oil into a pan, add a diced onion and sweat on a medium-to-low heat for a good 15/20 minutes, stirring every now and then. Finely chop the garlic and chilli and grate the ginger. Grind all the dry spices in a spice grinder or pestle and mortar. Once the onions are ready (they should be a nice darkish brown colour), add the garlic, ginger and chilli. Cook through for a couple of minutes. Then add the spices a cook for a minute. Add the tomatoes and salt, bring up the heat and let it all simmer through and cook for about 20 mins. Remove the curry from heat, add the coconut and blend it all up to a smooth sauce. Add both aubergines and stir though. Put back on a low heat and let it simmer through on a medium/low heat for at least another ten mins, I like to go a bit longer. Delice! PS If you want to beef it out add a tin of chickpeas or roasted sweet potato.
Buster Cherry
Buster Cherry - 7 minutes ago
U took harsh criticizm and owned it. Now look at you your own youtube channel. Congrats make more videos
Onaona Hi
Onaona Hi - 15 minutes ago
Love ❤️ auntie hersha
Enzo Ocampo III
Enzo Ocampo III - 16 minutes ago
Thank good that sweet woman wont you to hell after all
Anthony Scala
Anthony Scala - 17 minutes ago
Perhaps Uncle Roger should do a video on how to social distance...
kristyn Jensen
kristyn Jensen - 19 minutes ago
🤣
Jeff Espina
Jeff Espina - 20 minutes ago
Aww you two look cute together 😍
Goannalizard
Goannalizard - 36 minutes ago
🤣🤣🤣
Brick Life
Brick Life - 39 minutes ago
wrong colour
NarendraTheComic
NarendraTheComic - 56 minutes ago
Ummm...
Hirenji
Hirenji - Hour ago
Well u and uncle Roger already have fun
マルコデイブ
マルコデイブ - Hour ago
Bbc just wants some views
Elijah rideb
Elijah rideb - 2 hours ago
Why doesnt she have more views right now? Seriously
Izzat EIMNLN
Izzat EIMNLN - 2 hours ago
Careful with the knife 😃
ZeddliYT
ZeddliYT - 2 hours ago
heres the link that she can cook rice properly: usa-video.net/XeaKatzTlmc-video.html
vasanth vasanth
vasanth vasanth - 3 hours ago
holy shit this is an underrated channel, thanks to some uncle in the internet I found you
PINK CHANNEL
PINK CHANNEL - 3 hours ago
you're so cuteeeeee...
Nathan Leong
Nathan Leong - 3 hours ago
Hahahaha... a baby
Fancy McPants
Fancy McPants - 3 hours ago
Ana 😍 mage Hersheybug 💓
Edward You
Edward You - 4 hours ago
Maybe it's the right one.
Handy FX
Handy FX - 4 hours ago
the spongebob fried rice lady...
Isaac
Isaac - 4 hours ago
Please do more 😂 😂 😂 pleassssssssse
Isaac
Isaac - 4 hours ago
😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 It's thw wrong colour!!!
Isaac
Isaac - 4 hours ago
Loved this!!! 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂
Thomas Schwiertz
Thomas Schwiertz - 4 hours ago
Next: People throwing rice at them at their wedding...
Travels in India, London & the UK
Travels in India, London & the UK - 4 hours ago
😂
Daser147
Daser147 - 4 hours ago
Im just glad she didn't serve it with rice
Aniruddha Sarkar
Aniruddha Sarkar - 4 hours ago
Hahahaha.... 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂
•Rxsetta•
•Rxsetta• - 5 hours ago
The baby is cute tho lol
Lanthanum
Lanthanum - 5 hours ago
Hi
Nate p
Nate p - 5 hours ago
Hersha you should do a reaction video to uncle Roger's video
Niklas
Niklas - 7 hours ago
Holy shit you're funny
Angel's Wings
Angel's Wings - 7 hours ago
BBC Food: got it all wrong.
Mona emèrald B
Mona emèrald B - 7 hours ago
We love you HARSHA❤
Riross Umayam
Riross Umayam - 7 hours ago
She actuall know how to cook rice. I wonder what happened in BBC fried rice hahaha
JAM plays
JAM plays - 7 hours ago
Uncle Roger is king 🙌 🙆🍖
meow rio
meow rio - 9 hours ago
Yummy😋👍👍
meow rio
meow rio - 9 hours ago
You two are adorable
Xn
Xn - 10 hours ago
Is that uncle roger or Nigel??
Stray Productions
Stray Productions - 11 hours ago
I thought it was BF not BFF
Bing Lim
Bing Lim - 11 hours ago
The Uncle Roger's video on Hersha has made both of you famous. I have watched it multiple times and crack up everytime I watch it.
Nicholas Cauton
Nicholas Cauton - 13 hours ago
Damn. We all owe her an apology. If somebody deserves the full force of anger from all Asians, Polynesians, Africans, Latinos, Caribbeans, and Middle Easterners, it would be the BBC.
Emaniel Jerry
Emaniel Jerry - 13 hours ago
See. I always felt like some recipes ain't the chef's. Like they r doingnwhat they r told
Aster •
Aster • - 13 hours ago
She knows gow to cook rice, BBC isn't.
Jomari Magallanes Bacanto
Jomari Magallanes Bacanto - 13 hours ago
Do more videos with uncle Roger pleaseee❤️
Lofi Wurld
Lofi Wurld - 16 hours ago
She does in fact know, leave the woman alone lol
KILLER RBLX
KILLER RBLX - 16 hours ago
Auntie hellen be watching this Imagin
Nasim Laktit
Nasim Laktit - 20 hours ago
Bro this is so cursed why is Uncle Roger speaking so... *normal?*
Hatori Ibuki
Hatori Ibuki - 20 hours ago
Whattttt 😂😂😂 HAHAHAHAHAHA
Skywalker Animations
Skywalker Animations - 21 hour ago
🍚 👍 I remember you!
bryan limare
bryan limare - 21 hour ago
You look good together lol
Skett Playz
Skett Playz - 22 hours ago
Egg frie rice
Haydogzz
Haydogzz - 22 hours ago
Imagin being friends because of a fried rice
Skyler Serrao
Skyler Serrao - 22 hours ago
Binod
Van Lian
Van Lian - 22 hours ago
Aunty Helen will be so jealous 🤣🤣🤣
Epic1
Epic1 - 22 hours ago
smash
Denver Cayle Ong
Denver Cayle Ong - 23 hours ago
Haiyaa uncle Roger will be sad but that ok auntie Jenny will meet uncle Roger soon.
My Taste Is You
My Taste Is You - 23 hours ago
She's so beautiful😍😍😍😍😘
zogem sitlhou
zogem sitlhou - 23 hours ago
So uncle roger has been faking his chinese accent all along?
Hélène
Hélène - Day ago
Just wanted to send you a lot of love ❤ Because you look like a lovely person and one video doesn't define you :)
Shoto Todoroki
Shoto Todoroki - Day ago
Who's the man name UwU
Ritez Lifestyle
Ritez Lifestyle - Day ago
You're definitely going to blow up on internet. You're so talented
Ritez Lifestyle
Ritez Lifestyle - Day ago
She is Indian . She obviously know how cook authentic rice.
Jessenil Teles
Jessenil Teles - Day ago
I would love to see some drama between them while they cook rice....
Rose
Rose - Day ago
Thank god! *Sighs in asian*
Yong Cai Low
Yong Cai Low - Day ago
Egg fried rice !
Tommy Karate
Tommy Karate - Day ago
I wouldn't turn her down either! Lol
송강Song Kang
송강Song Kang - Day ago
I thought he really has that kind of accent😓
Ehjay Diwa
Ehjay Diwa - Day ago
Shit FR
Jason Bailey
Jason Bailey - Day ago
Also that hair flip reminds me of Seth from metal unlimited lol
Jason Bailey
Jason Bailey - Day ago
This was really good. Don't be discouraged by the egg whatever comments. This was well thought out, entertaining, and good. Keep making whatever content you enjoy because the content that you make is good.
Manila Martin
Manila Martin - Day ago
Became a new fan! Nevermind the trolls. You are lovely!
Headphone Pasta
Headphone Pasta - Day ago
*_Love need Egg Fried Rice and Uncle Roger._*
Headphone Pasta
Headphone Pasta - Day ago
_Not gonna lie they both looked so cute together XD_
Manila Martin
Manila Martin - Day ago
New sub. Can't wait
MrMrsboo
MrMrsboo - Day ago
Suddenly comedy?
MrMrsboo
MrMrsboo - Day ago
Why would an Asian person cook rice in this way because the BBC told them to? I would say, 'that's not the way rice is made?' And educate people how to do it. It literally is more effort to do it the way she did...not easier. Billions of Asians around the world do not do this...have never done this, will never do this? So why for the BBC would you cook it in an English way to make a Chinese dish. The BBC can't be blamed as plenty of cooking shows on the BBC show the correct way. People saying it's just rice? Clearly not Asian/part Asian or from a rice eating country which makes up most of the world believe it or not. It would be like someone European telling Asians to cook potatoes in a weird and illogical way because a Chinese TV station told them to.
Ariel Sharon
Ariel Sharon - Day ago
Miss Hersha taking the Uncle Roger incident a positive thing, Kudos to that... Cant w8 for the collab..
oh hi
oh hi - Day ago
wait what why does uncle roger have a semi normal accent thats illegal
Kenshi Takashima
Kenshi Takashima - Day ago
Uncle Roger: "This is how i met your mother" Their Children: Woahh,such a beautiful story! Aunty Hersha: *shy ^_^ the end. ps: i think they can make love story movie about RICE..xD #joke #lovestory
Kylaro Medina
Kylaro Medina - Day ago
U look good together... Idk why i ship u two lmao
Amigo Reyes
Amigo Reyes - Day ago
Hersha we love you~
cruz lim
cruz lim - Day ago
BBC is rude
poulu
poulu - Day ago
Rice lady is soo cool even tho she got trolled hahhaaaha
Josh Xue
Josh Xue - Day ago
Marvel: Avenegers endgame will be the most ambitious crossover in history Uncle Roger: *Hold ma rice*
Justin Park
Justin Park - Day ago
Lol funny
Paula Gabriela
Paula Gabriela - Day ago
THE RECEIPT.
deen samin
deen samin - Day ago
No accent??? lol
crunchyhashbrown
crunchyhashbrown - Day ago
Well done Hersha!! What a way to react!
Rosetta Stone
Rosetta Stone - Day ago
Looking through your channel your recipes look delicious!!
Stronzo 69
Stronzo 69 - Day ago
Oh just cook HER already
RJB
RJB - Day ago
Love this
Fofofofofofo Fofofofofofofo
Fofofofofofo Fofofofofofofo - Day ago
Wait why is uncle roger talking weird like that
Trevor Vallo
Trevor Vallo - Day ago
Uncle Roger will choose Aunite Hersha
opzz xsin
opzz xsin - Day ago
So uncle Roger had this plan out form the start, senpai gotta teach me the way
MadaMada !
MadaMada ! - Day ago
Fuck bbc for making her look bad
Rath
Rath - Day ago
Why does an Indian woman have a English accent
Robert Tran
Robert Tran - Day ago
can you and Hersha go apesh!t on a Karen cooking? My wife’s white. She’s terrible in the kitchen. It would be awesome.
Robert Tran
Robert Tran - Day ago
In your collab video with the unc, can you go apesh!t on a Karen cooking? My wife’s white. She’s terrible in the kitchen. I would think it’s hilarious.
kiorsly
kiorsly - Day ago
Looking forward to both of u! And love it how both of u have come friends!. Please don’t hate her or leave bad comments, she is nice n beautiful. Love u hersha 😊
Hzwoo
Hzwoo - Day ago
Uh... this is better.... uncle roger is making us alllllll come to this video and your channel lol