Vox
Vox
  • 1 047
  • 1 550 495 814
  • 100
  • Joined Mar 4, 2014
Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives.
Vox video is Joe Posner, Mona Lalwani, Valerie Lapinski, Dion Lee, Ashley Sather, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Adam Freelander, Kim Mas, Coleman Lowndes, Christophe Haubursin, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Alvin Chang, Ranjani Chakraborty, Liz Scheltens, Phil Edwards, Bridgett Henwood, Rajaa Elidissi, Christina Thornell, Danush Parvaneh, Madeline Marshall, Melissa Hirsch, and Tyrice Hester, with contributions from Johnny Harris and engagement support from Agnes Mazur and Blair Hickman.
If you want to help Vox video create more ambitious explainers and series that teach you things about the world, and get exclusive behind-the-scenes access, become a member of the Vox Video Lab: www.vox.com/join
✉️ Write us: voxvideo@vox.com
✉️ To request permission to use our videos: permissions@voxmedia.com
✉️ For questions about the Video Lab: videolab@voxmedia.com

Video
Memory, explained | Narrated by Emma Stone
Memory, explained | Narrated by Emma Stone
4 days ago
Episode one from our new miniseries THE MIND, EXPLAINED on Netflix. Watch now: www.netflix.com/mindexplained THE MIND, EXPLAINED takes a five-episode deep dive into how our brains handle memory, anxiety, psychedelics and dreams. Narrated by Emma Stone. After nearly a year of labor behind the scenes, we have an announcement for you: Explained is finally back! And during this year, we’ve turned our attention to a crucial question: Why can’t we remember what is in the fridge? Or more importantly, why can’t we remember most of the details of our own lives? Why do an estimated 1 in 3 people suffer from an anxiety disorder at some point? And why, when we go to bed at night, are we overcome with strange visions? Do our dreams actually mean anything, or serve any purpose? Our minds often feel like a black box. And the stakes of these questions go far beyond the fridge - to our fundamental sense of reality, and what it means to be human. How can we help ourselves, and each other, when our minds betray us? What can we do to take back some control? Scientists have figured out so much more than you might realize - and today, we’re diving deep, with 5 brand new episodes narrated by Emma Stone taking you on an adventure through the mind, available today. Our weekly episodes return, as well, on September 26th. They’ll be right here - www.netflix.com/explained where Season 1 also awaits any of you who haven’t seen it yet. Thanks so much to all of you who watch, support, and even teach the series. If you’re a teacher wondering if you can use the series: yes you can. Here’s Netflix’s policy: media.netflix.com/en/only-on-netflix/247606 And for more ideas of things we should cover in explained, send us a note at explained@vox.com. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
The gun solution we're not talking about
The gun solution we're not talking about
5 days ago
Universal background checks won't fix America's gun crisis. But there's something else that might. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab It seems like after every mass shooting, politicians talk about expanding background checks for gun buyers. But background checks don't actually do a great job of keeping dangerous people from getting guns. What does? A licensing system, where before you can buy a gun, you need a license from the state. * Dig deeper into Massachusetts' licensing system on Vox.com: www.vox.com/2018/11/13/17658028/massachusetts-gun-control-laws-licenses * And read the Johns Hopkins research on gun licensing: www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/johns-hopkins-center-for-gun-policy-and-research/research/licensing/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The chart that predicts recessions
The chart that predicts recessions
16 days ago
A chart called the "yield curve" has predicted every US recession over the last 50 years. Now it might be predicting another one. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Economic experts are starting to warn that a US recession is becoming more likely because of something called the "yield curve." So what's the yield curve? What does it show? And why is it bad if it "inverts?" We visualized the yield curve over the past four decades, to show why it's so good at predicting recessions, and what it actually means when the curve changes. Read more about the yield curve: * Vox's Matt Yglesias has an explainer: www.vox.com/2019/8/14/20805404/yield-curve-inversion-recession-10-year-2-year * Here's how the man who discovered this trend, Campbell Harvey, describes the phenomenon: www.forbes.com/sites/carminegallo/2019/08/18/how-the-finance-prof-who-discovered-the-inverted-yield-curve-explains-it-to-grandma/#17cadff86cae * The New York Times explains it .... with a football analogy: www.nytimes.com/2019/08/15/upshot/inverted-yield-curve-bonds-football-analogy.html * We used data from the Federal Reserve to make these charts. Here's the yield curve data day-to-day: www.treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=yield * And if you really want to dig into historical data, use this tool: www.federalreserve.gov/datadownload/Choose.aspx?rel=H15 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The mysterious rays shooting at us from space
The mysterious rays shooting at us from space
17 days ago
Cosmic rays are hitting us all the time. What are they? Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab You may think the greatest mysteries of the universe exist way out there, at the edge of a black hole. But they actually surround us all the time - and even sail right through our bodies. One such mystery is cosmic rays, radiation from space made of tiny bits of atoms. They’re not harmful to humans, but they’re perplexing physicists, who don’t know where they’re coming from. They’re super powerful - many are much too powerful to have originated from our sun or an exploding star. And because they don’t often travel in a straight line, it’s hard to pinpoint their true origin. This video is based on Vox science reporter Brian Resnick’s in-depth article about cosmic rays: www.vox.com/the-highlight/2019/7/16/17690740/cosmic-rays-universe-theory-science For more on how cosmic rays can affect computers, check out Radiolab’s podcast “Bit Flip” www.wnycstudios.org/story/bit-flip If you want to watch more videos like this, check out our friends at Verge Science. They do a ton of hands-on experiments and explorations into the future of science: usa-video.net/u/vergescience Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: We caught a cosmic ray, one of science’s biggest mysteries Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The naked lady that changed the rules of art
The naked lady that changed the rules of art
18 days ago
Western art followed the same rules for centuries. Until Olympia. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab For centuries, the art world was controlled by the Academy of Fine Arts in Paris. They dictated how art should look and had the power to make or break an artist’s career. Getting into their yearly exhibition, the Paris Salon, was like an express pass to success. But in the late 1800s, artists started to push back against the Academy’s rules, which changed the landscape of the art world forever. To learn more about Manet’s Olympia, listen to the ArtCurious Podcast’s episode about the painting: www.artcuriouspodcast.com/artcuriouspodcast/41?rq=olympia Or read Charles Bernheimer’s “Manet's Olympia: The Figuration of Scandal”: www.jstor.org/stable/1773024 And if you want to learn more about Manet, the Impressionists, or just brush up on your art historical terms, check out The Oxford Companion to Western Art: www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780198662037.001.0001/acref-9780198662037 Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: The scandalous painting that helped create modern art Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why the US drinking age is 21
Why the US drinking age is 21
24 days ago
Why is the US drinking age 21? And how did it happen? In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores the history of the somewhat unusual way the drinking age became 21. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It brings you closer to our work and gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab After prohibition - the total ban on alcohol - many states established a minimum legal drinking age of 21. But that began to change after the voting age was lowered to 18. Many states followed by lowering their drinking ages, which changed the landscape for the entire country. By the 1980s, this unusual patchwork of drinking ages started to be seen as a problem, especially by activist organizations like MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Drivers) and RID (Remove Intoxicated Drivers). They lobbied for a 21-year-old minimum legal drinking age, and President Ronald Reagan supported the cause. His mechanism for enabling a national law? Threatening to withhold Federal Highway funding to states that didn’t comply. It was an unpredictable strategy for an official typically hesitant to use federal power over the states, and the practice was eventually challenged in the Supreme Court, where it was upheld. Beyond the political clash, it’s a look at how roads shape policy. Further reading Watch President Reagan’s speech about his alcohol policy. The Reagan Library on USa-video has a huge repository of speeches, photo ops, and ephemera related to the Reagan Presidency. usa-video.net/nfe-hU6zGS8-video.html Here are the full remarks with Michael Jackson: usa-video.net/MgFgTs5N8q8-video.html And another view of that day’s events: usa-video.net/VHSf8sIMBM8-video.html Here’s the Center for Disease Control’s review of the minimum legal drinking age’s (MLDA) effects (including the paper cited in this video): www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/minimum-legal-drinking-age.htm For a dissenting view, you can read this paper questioning the effectiveness of the MLDA: www.nber.org/papers/w13257.pdf This is the Supreme Court case that affirmed the MLDA law. www.oyez.org/cases/1986/86-260 Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why the US and Iran are fighting over this tiny waterway
Why the US and Iran are fighting over this tiny waterway
25 days ago
The Strait of Hormuz, “the jugular of the global economy," has become a useful bargaining chip for Iran. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The Strait of Hormuz is a narrow waterway that lies between Iran and Oman. This 21 mile-wide passage supports 20% of the world’s oil supply. A closure of this waterway could send the global economy into a tailspin. In recent months, several oil tankers have been seized, attacked and harassed. These oil tankers - and this narrow water passage - are at the center of the conflict between the US and Iran. It's a conflict that spans decades and has the potential to escalate in one of the world’s most important oil chokepoints. Read more about the recent escalation between the US and Iran: www.vox.com/world/2019/6/21/18700857/us-iran-standoff-timeline Strait of Hormuz stats and details from the US Energy Information Administration: www.eia.gov/beta/international/regions-topics.php?RegionTopicID=WOTC More on the history of conflict between the US and Iran in the Strait of Hormuz in David Crist's novel, The Twilight War: www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/307277/the-twilight-war-by-david-crist/9780143123675/ Vox Atlas demonstrates where conflicts occur on a map and the ways in which foreign policy shapes a region. Watch all the episodes here: bit.ly/2SThVsf Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Where Sicko Mode's weirdest moments came from
Where Sicko Mode's weirdest moments came from
27 days ago
Tracing the roots of Jamaican dub music. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab "Sicko Mode" by Travis Scott was an unexpected chart-topper. It sounds more like three songs than one. Its disjointed, other-worldly effects, echos, and song structure are a far cry from the traditional pop songs we're used to, but it's in these off-kilter moments that we get glimpses of a musical culture and genre that was centered around sonic experimentation and innovation, and has influenced everything from punk, rock, and pop for nearly half a century: Jamaican dub. Spotify playlist "Sicko dub mode" open.spotify.com/playlist/3EJ3Rpxk8K6YfRum952NET?si=EM_5kWDXQIuj0kc-5iaWYg Earworm is a series where Estelle Caswell takes you on a musical journey to discover the stories and sounds behind your favorite songs. More videos can be found here: usa-video.net/pl/PLJ8cMiYb3G5fyqfIwGjH2fYC5fFLfdwW4 Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why Route 66 became America’s most famous road
Why Route 66 became America’s most famous road
Month ago
Route 66 is iconic. Why? Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It brings you closer to our work and gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab Route 66 has gained a reputation as the United States of America’s most famous road. How did that happen, and why does it still matter? In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores the history of the road and the textures of its present, from the road itself to the roadside attractions along the way, to the people who enjoy its diversions and those who help maintain them. It reveals a road that’s changed a lot over the decades but remains vital in unexpected ways. When Cyrus Avery helped found Route 66 in the 1920s, he strived to create a road that would connect the Midwest to the West, and he resorted to promotional tricks and wheeling and dealing to get it done. The road quickly became a key route for migrants escaping the dust bowl and depression, forming its early reputation as “the Mother Road.” That’s because it’s a road that’s more than a strip of concrete (or gravel, or dirt). It’s a historical document of everyone who’s traveled on it - as the many contributions from Vox’s USa-video subscribers show, that keeps it going even as the interstates run alongside it. The number of Route 66 resources out there is huge, but we found these particularly helpful. Check out Ron's site! www.route66news.com/ The Curt Teich Archives www.newberry.org/curt-teich-p... You won't find essays here, but you will find a treasure trove of postcards that we used in this piece, including tons of Route 66 arcana. Route 66: The Highway and Its People www.amazon.com/gp/product/080... I got to speak with Quinta Scott about her gorgeous photographs of Route 66, as well as the interviews she recorded with coauthor Susan Kelly. This book is a pleasure to look at and is packed full of information and interviews that you just can’t get any more. The Route 66 Road Ahead Partnership route66roadahead.com/ If you’re curious about Route 66 preservation and revitalization, this group is one of the strongest interstate partnerships searching for new ways to promote and improve the road. Our video about the Green Book, a critical resource for black Americans wanting to travel across the country on Route 66 and beyond in the mid-1900s. usa-video.net/b33PN2NB2Do-video.html Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What the US gets wrong about minimum wage
What the US gets wrong about minimum wage
Month ago
Raising the minimum wage doesn’t have to be so hard. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The American federal minimum wage hasn’t gone up in a decade. That’s the longest wait since the US first set a minimum wage in 1938. Today, Congress is debating whether they should raise it again. But the fact that Congress has to debate it at all is… kind of weird. In the US, unlike in other developed countries, the minimum wage is a political issue. That means it gets raised irregularly and unpredictably. And that causes a bunch of problems for American workers and businesses. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Read more about the current debate to raise the minimum wage from Alexia: www.vox.com/2019/7/18/20697509/minimum-wage-bill-raise-the-wage-act And more about what other countries do, from the OECD: www.oecd.org/employment/emp/Minimum%20wages.pdf Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
We measured pop music’s falsetto obsession
We measured pop music’s falsetto obsession
Month ago
From Justin Timberlake to the Bee Gees, we charted the popularity of men singing high. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab It’s nearly impossible to turn on the radio and not hear a male artist singing really high. Likely he’s a tenor, and more often than not he’ll sing in falsetto. Think Justin Bieber, The Weeknd, Bruno Mars, Drake, Charlie Puth, Shawn Mendes, Adam Levine, Sam Smith ... the list goes on and on and on. This isn’t a trend - it has been the status quo for decades. Using the data diving know-how of The Pudding, and drawing on the expertise of Anthony Roth Costanzo, a professional opera singer, I dig into the world of the high male vocal range by tracking how pervasive it really is across the decades. The Pudding: pudding.cool/ IG: @the.pudding Twitter: @puddingviz The articles referenced in the video can be found here: The Evolution of the Male Falsetto: frieze.com/article/evolution-male-falsetto What does it mean when The Weeknd hits a high note: www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/what-does-it-mean-when-the-weeknd-hits-a-high-note/2016/12/01/4969c506-b65b-11e6-959c-172c82123976_story.html?noredirect=on Active Child, Prince, and the Science of the Male Falsetto: pitchfork.com/thepitch/794-active-child-prince-and-the-science-of-the-male-falsetto/ Why Are There So Many Tough Guys Who Sound Like Ladies On The Radio?: www.npr.org/2016/02/15/466404515/why-are-there-so-many-tough-guys-who-sound-like-ladies-on-the-radio Here's a Spotify list of 65+ songs that have some pretty fun falsetto moments: open.spotify.com/playlist/0nUxhLp94vGOARoCJKkV0k?si=sGtRcGPtQ_-Dktcc5H_Thg And here’s the same Pandora playlist: www.pandora.com/playlist/PL:1688849921711361:7344 And a list of all of the songs featured in this video by timestamp: 1:04 - Want to Want Me - Jason Derulo 1:09 - Sugar - Maroon 5 1:18 - Sorry - Justin Bieber 1:30 - Can’t Feel My Face - The Weeknd 1:32 - What Do You Mean - Justin Bieber 1:36 - The Hills - The Weeknd 1:42 - Hello - Adele 3:33 - Sleep, Baby, Sleep - George P Watson 3:47 - Ill Wind - Radiohead 5:37 - Redbone - Childish Gambino 6:10 - Rock of Ages - Def Leppard 7:10 - Get Lucky - Daft Punk 7:21 - Crocodile Rock - Elton John 8:23 - Killer Queen - Queen 8:55 - I Knew I loved You - Savage Garden 9:28 - Stayin’ Alive - Bee Gees 9:50 - Falsetto - The-Dream 10:17 - Cry Me A River - Justin Timberlake 11:52 - Sweet Child O’ Mine - Guns N’ Roses 11:55 - Two Hearts - Phil Collins 12:01 - Rocket 2 U - The Jets 12:19 - Smooth Criminal - Michael Jackson 12:28 - Nite and Day - Al B. Sure 12:33 - You Should Be Dancing - Bee Gees 14:33- Me And Those Dreaming Eyes of Mine - D’Angelo 14:44 - So In Love - Curtis Mayfield 15:38 - Sherry - Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons 15:48 - Natural - Bloodstone 16:00 - Starboy - The Weeknd Earworm is a series where Estelle Caswell takes you on a musical journey to discover the stories and sounds behind your favorite songs. More videos can be found here: usa-video.net/pl/PLJ8cMiYb3G5fyqfIwGjH2fYC5fFLfdwW4 Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why so many suburbs look the same
Why so many suburbs look the same
Month ago
So many suburbs have similar plans. Why? Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It brings you closer to our work and gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards investigates the system behind the shape of the suburbs. If you’ve visited a suburb, you’ve probably noticed a similar look: same curving streets; same cul de sacs. It’s not an accident. In fact, this appearance of the suburbs is part of the Federal Housing Administration’s plan. In the 1930s, the Federal Housing Administration, or FHA, was the financial engine behind most home development. To ensure their investments were safe ones, they strongly recommended that builders and developers comply with the ideals they set. Those regulations aligned closely with the values of the time, including segregation and a burgeoning car culture. These rules encouraged suburbs with winding streets and cul de sacs - aesthetically pleasing designs that led to sprawl and made a car a necessity. Even though the enforcement mechanisms have changed over time, we still live in a culture shaped by the FHA’s ideal suburban design. If you want to learn more, there are a couple of resources: Streets and the Shaping of Towns and Cities by Michael Southworth and Eran Ben-Joseph www.amazon.com/Streets-Shaping-Cities-Michael-Southworth/dp/1559639164 Eran Ben-Joseph spoke to me about his book, which provides a great overview of suburban planning. It also has more crucial detail about street widths, which influenced car culture. FHA Underwriting Manual www.huduser.gov/portal/sites/default/files/pdf/Federal-Housing-Administration-Underwriting-Manual.pdf If you’re curious to wade into some primary documents, this underwriting manual from 1938 is a good place to start. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How Davy Crockett became an American legend
How Davy Crockett became an American legend
Month ago
Was Davy Crockett a sellout? And does it matter? Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It brings you closer to our work and gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab In this episode of History Club, Vox’s Phil Edwards asks Coleman Lowndes a question: Was this American legend really as great as he was cracked up to be? Davy Crockett’s become an American tall tale, but he was a real person and member of Congress. That’s where things get complicated. His incredible feats of bear-killing and frontier exploring intersected with a political career that was catalyzed by central banking. When Crockett was alive, Andrew Jackson was president, and Jackson was embroiled in a battle over the Second Bank of the United States. That battle eventually resulted in the creation of a new political party - the Whigs - and the Whigs decided Crockett could help advance their cause. In a strange way, it’s possible to trace the American icon and baby boomer fad back to this banking battle. And it says something about celebrity, politics, and how Americans imagine their history. If you want to read more about Davy Crockett, check out: The Autobiography of Davy Crockett by David Crockett: It’s folksy, occasionally true, and free. archive.org/details/autobiographyofd00croc David Crockett: The Man and the Legend by James Shackford: This meticulously researched biography is a precise look at the legend’s life. www.amazon.com/David-Crockett-James-Atkins-Shackford/dp/0803292309 Portraying an American Original: The Likenesses of Davy Crockett by Frederick Voss: I first encountered this essay in David Lofaro’s anthology of David Crockett history, but it’s a bit hard to find online. You can read this neat art history essay online. www.jstor.org/stable/30240051?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
All student debt in the US, visualized
All student debt in the US, visualized
Month ago
What if all of this debt was canceled? This is what that would look like. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Student loan debt has increased exponentially in the past few decades. So now, some Democratic presidential candidates propose canceling those debts - all $1.6 trillion of it. But is this a good idea? Who exactly does it benefit? For more on student loan debt, read this Vox explainer on Elizabeth Warren's plan: www.vox.com/2019/4/22/18509196/elizabeth-warren-debt-free-college And this explainer on Bernie Sanders's plan: www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/6/23/18714615/bernie-sanders-free-college-for-all-2020-student-loan-debt This piece explains why wonks don't like Sanders's plan: www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/6/26/18760296/bernie-sanders-college-for-all-cancel-student-debt-warren And to get a wider perspective on the whole debate, Matt Yglesias breaks it down: www.vox.com/2019/6/24/18677785/democrats-free-college-sanders-warren-biden Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Where Manhattan’s grid plan came from
Where Manhattan’s grid plan came from
Month ago
Manhattan is famous for its grid - so famous that people take pictures of the way the sun shines through it. But the origin of that grid wasn’t always certain - and not everybody is a fan. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab In this episode of Vox Almanac’s Road Trip edition, Phil Edwards explores the history of the New York City grid, with detours to Philadelphia, Savannah, and Washington, DC. Early city planning around the turn of the 19th century was a contentious and undecided discipline with lots of options and disagreement. New York City was particularly chaotic and unplanned at the time, after years of catering to developers and, at the same time, ignoring their requests for a more sane city plan. That made the introduction of a new plan in the 1800s a more urgent matter - and a reasonable time to introduce a plan that lacked many of the artistic flourishes of contemporary city plans. New York was all about building, and building fast - and it’s still that way today. Want to learn more? The two most helpful papers we found were these: “The grid as city plan: New York city and laissez‐faire planning in the nineteenth century” by Peter Marcuse and “The Greatest Grid: the New York Plan of 1811” by Edward K. Spann. You can also find copies of a lot of early maps of New York via the Library of Congress and New York Public Library. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How scientists colorize photos of space
How scientists colorize photos of space
Month ago
Yes, that’s a black and white photo. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The Hubble Space Telescope only takes photos in black and white. To make those beautiful space photos you’ve probably seen, scientists add the color later using a technique first developed around the turn of the 20th century that imitates how our eyes naturally perceive color. If you want to explore more Hubble photos, a lot of information came from this site: hubblesite.org/ And be sure to check out Kimberly Arcand and Travis Rector's book, "Coloring the Universe:" www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/C/bo22276742.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why the US has so many tornadoes
Why the US has so many tornadoes
Month ago
Tornado Alley experiences more tornadoes than anywhere else in the world - why? This video is presented by CuriosityStream: www.curiositystream.com/Vox Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The United States experiences more tornadoes than any other country, averaging over 1,200 per year. Most of those twisters are touching down in the central part of the country in an area called “Tornado Alley.” While the boundaries of this tornado hotbed are disputed, there’s no denying that something is going on here - and it all has to do with geography. The map we use in this video for Tornado Alley boundaries is from NOAA - you can find that and more information on their website: www.ncdc.noaa.gov/climate-information/extreme-events/us-tornado-climatology/tornado-alley Information on tornado averages and trends can also be found at NOAA: www.ncdc.noaa.gov/climate-information/extreme-events/us-tornado-climatology/trends You may have noticed on our graphic around the one-minute mark that many of the Southeastern US states are prone to tornadoes as well. This is because they’re part of an area called “Dixie Alley.” The main difference between this area and Tornado Alley that tornadoes in Dixie Alley are more likely to touch down in the fall, while Tornado Alley experiences twisters in the early spring. This happens for the reasons outlined in the video above. This article offers a fairly compelling comparison of the two: citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.660.5241&rep=rep1&type=pdf Finally, this video offered a simplified explanation of a really complex weather phenomenon. This National Geographic article does a really great job breaking it down again and also offers information on why it’s so hard to track and predict tornadoes: news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/05/150511-tornadoes-storms-midwest-weather-science/ Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The dark history of "gasoline baths" at the border
The dark history of "gasoline baths" at the border
Month ago
An alarming US border policy forced fumigations on migrants at the US-Mexico border. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab In 1917, American health officials launched a campaign to use noxious, often toxic chemicals to delouse immigrants seeking to enter at the US-Mexico border. The same practice had caused a fire in an El Paso jail the year before and killed 27 people. 17-year-old Juárez maid Carmelita Torres refused to go through it, sparking a protest of thousands of Mexicans at the El Paso border. Although they briefly shut down the border, the campaign would continue for decades -- and go on to inspire Nazi scientists. For more reading, check out the links below: David Dorado Romo’s book, Ringside Seat to a Revolution: www.cincopuntos.com/products_detail.sstg?id=91 The Bracero History Archive: braceroarchive.org John Mckiernan-González’s book, Fevered Measures: Public Health and Race at the Texas -Mexico Border, 1848-1942: www.dukeupress.edu/fevered-measures Alexandra Minna Stern’s book, Eugenic Nation: www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520285064/eugenic-nation This is the second episode of our Missing Chapter series, where Vox producer Ranjani Chakraborty revisits underreported and often overlooked moments from the past to give context to the present. Join her as she covers the histories that are often left out of our textbooks. Our first season tackles stories of racial injustice, political conflicts, even the hidden history of US medical experimentation. Have an idea for a story that Ranjani should investigate for Missing Chapter? Send it to her via this form! bit.ly/2RhjxMy Sign up for the Missing Chapter newsletter to stay up to date with the series: vox.com/missing-chapter Explore the full Missing Chapter playlist, including episodes, a creator Q&A, and more! usa-video.net/pl/PLJ8cMiYb3G5fR2kt0L4Nihvel4pEDw9od Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Thomas Edison's road trip with his famous friends
Thomas Edison's road trip with his famous friends
Month ago
It’s time to go road-tripping with some men who ran the world. Join the Vox Video Lab: bit.ly/video-lab This is episode one of Vox Almanac’s new season all about roads - and this is a classic road trip to kick it off with. Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, Harvey Firestone, and John Burroughs became famous as “the Vagabonds” - a traveling group that took to the (primitive) roads to see the country and make the occasional business deal. Their exploits captured the imagination of the entire country, and it even involved a few naps. Along the way, the unique foursome chopped trees, explored, and ate in style (while catering to the film crew they brought with them). The resulting output was a mix of PR and good old-fashioned fun. Even President Warren G. Harding joined along at one point just to see what the Vagabonds were up to. Further reading: Check out Potato Jet! usa-video.net/c/UCNJe8uQhM2G4jJFRWiM89Wg In Under the Maples, naturalist John Burroughs discusses his philosophy (and a few of his camping exploits). www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/30246 R.J.H. DeLoach wrote the most indispensable memoir of life with “The Vagabonds.” You can read it free once you log in. www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/41398265.pdf Finally, if you just want to check out raw videos of the group, The Henry Ford puts them on their USa-video channel. usa-video.net/C0zKDIs_bWs-video.html Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why the Tour de France is so brutal
Why the Tour de France is so brutal
Month ago
It's all about the climbs. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO The Tour de France is the most prominent cycling race in the world. It’s now in its 109th edition and it’s being called the ‘Highest in History’ because there are more climbs than ever before. This is important because the climbs are where the race is won and lost. The best riders rely on their teammates to get them through the long, flat, and hilly stages, before they take on the mountain stages on their own. These are the hardest and most brutal stages of the race - but they are exactly what makes the Tour de France famous. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
India’s cow vigilantes are targeting Muslims
India’s cow vigilantes are targeting Muslims
Month ago
In India, Muslims are being killed over cows. This season of Borders is presented by CuriosityStream. Watch thousands of documentaries for free for 31-days: www.curiositystream.com/Borders Join the Video Lab to help us make more Vox Borders! bit.ly/video-lab Follow the Vox Borders watch page: facebook.com/VoxBorders/ Follow Johnny on Instagram: instagram.com/johnnywharris/ Sign up for the Borders newsletter: www.vox.com/borders-email With original music by Tom Fox: tfbeats.com/ India’s government has strict laws surrounding cow slaughter because cows are sacred in Hinduism. Prime Minister Narendra Modi emphasized the need to make sure India’s cows are protected and some state governments followed suit by opening more cow shelters and ordering more police crackdowns. But some took cow protection into their own hands. Cow vigilantes started patrolling neighborhoods looking to physically punish those who were allegedly harboring cows, consuming cows or even transporting cows. In most cases, the victims of these mob beatings were Muslim. This Vox Borders episode looks at why violence over cows increased since India’s elections in 2014. Watch all the episodes of Vox Borders: India here: usa-video.net/u/playlist?list... Vox Borders is an international documentary series by Emmy-nominated producer Johnny Harris exploring life at the edge of nations. Start from the beginning. Watch all full episodes of Vox Borders on USa-video in one playlist: www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dVwv... Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How Trump took over America's courts
How Trump took over America's courts
Month ago
How Trump and McConnell are changing the country for a generation. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab President Donald Trump is building his longest-lasting legacy in a place that’s often overlooked: the federal courts. It’s not just the Supreme Court that’s important - it hears less than 100 cases a year - his impact is being seen in places like the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. This court has stopped many of Trump’s most controversial executive orders: the travel ban, emergency funding for a border wall. But this historically liberal court won’t look very liberal at the end of Trump’s first term. Read more about Trump’s appointment of judges on Vox.com: www.vox.com/2018/12/27/18136294/trump-mitch-mconnell-republican-judges And more about the roles of America’s federal court system: www.uscourts.gov/statistics-reports/federal-judicial-caseload-statistics-2018 Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: The GOP's historic takeover of America's courts Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Vox Almanac is going on a road trip
Vox Almanac is going on a road trip
Month ago
Watch episode one right here: usa-video.net/ObKE1m3EmdE-video.html Buckle up. Vox Almanac is going on a road trip. Senior producer Phil Edwards explores five stories about how roads shape culture. It's a journey that goes everywhere from New York City in the 1800s to Route 66 today - with a lot of surprising stops in between. Watch all of the Vox Almanac episodes here: usa-video.net/eUkeI_JkArU-video.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Join the Vox Video lab to help us make more ambitious series like this one: usa-video.net/8Xvobo6d9LY-video.html Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
India's trucks are works of art
India's trucks are works of art
2 months ago
Why India’s trucks are so colorful. Season 2 of Borders is presented by CuriosityStream. Watch thousands of documentaries for free for 31 days: www.curiositystream.com/Borders Join the Video Lab to support Vox Borders: bit.ly/video-lab Follow the Vox Borders watch page: facebook.com/VoxBorders/ Follow Johnny on Instagram: instagram.com/johnnywharris/ Sign up for the Borders newsletter: www.vox.com/borders-email With original music by Tom Fox: tfbeats.com/ Bedfords were first introduced to British India during World War II. This truck model and others similar to it stuck around, and since then they've been produced commercially throughout the country. But today, they’re not just functional and mundane - their paintings make them stand out. Colorful trucks aren’t rare in India, and their designs aren’t random. Artists that specialize in painting these trucks put a lot of thought into the art form, making the vehicles a spectacle of beauty in India. This Vox Borders episode looks at why truck art is such a staple in India. Watch the first episode of Vox Borders: India -- usa-video.net/r5Ps1TZXAN8-video.html Watch all the episodes of Vox Borders: India here: usa-video.net/pl/PLJ8cMiYb3G5eLwIHwp0NAPJaLSo9qNexm Vox Borders is an international documentary series by Emmy-nominated producer Johnny Harris exploring life at the edge of nations. Start from the beginning. Watch all full episodes of Vox Borders on USa-video in one playlist: usa-video.net/-dVwv4wPA88-video.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The ingredients of a classic house track
The ingredients of a classic house track
2 months ago
With a disco sample and drum machine house music took over the globe . Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab House has become one of the most popular forms of electronic music since its inception in the late 80’s. It began in Chicago, when local DJ’s and music producers experimented with remixing disco vocals over hard hitting drum machines. They would soon play a huge role in popularizing the sound and distinguishing house music as a global music genre. Chicago gospel singer, Loleatta Halloway, is one of the most widely sampled artists in house music history. Her song “Love Sensation” has been sampled nearly 300 times, including on Black Box’s “Ride on Time”, the notorious hit that became the best selling single in the U.K in 1989. Special thanks to James Wiltshire and Torsten Schmidt for offering their expertise in this video. Links to them are below: James Wiltshire: usa-video.net/aSFQIlnB_1k-video.html Torsten Schmidt: daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/author/torsten-schmidt There are countless histories on house music across the internet, the ones listed below proved tremendously helpful in putting this video together. Red Bull Music Academy, TR-909 and House music daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/2016/09/instrumental-instruments-909 Time to Jack: Chip E on the Birth of Chicago House daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/2019/01/chip-e-interview Frankie Knuckles on the Birth of House Music | Red Bull Music Academy usa-video.net/OM0fga9HdIE-video.html The Chicago Record Store That Popularized House daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/2016/11/importes-etc-feature When Techno Was House daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/2017/08/chicago-house-detroit-techno-feature Collection of WBMX radio show playlists www.gridface.com/ How Loleatta Holloway Became Disco’s Most Sampled Artist www.electronicbeats.net/how-loleatta-holloway-became-discos-most-sampled-artist/ I was there when house music took over the world usa-video.net/9Rah1F1zq1k-video.html Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: How Chicago built house music from the ashes of disco Follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: facebook.com/VoxEarworm Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. And be sure to check out Earworm's complete first season here: bit.ly/2QCwhMH Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The problem with America's college entrance exam
The problem with America's college entrance exam
2 months ago
In the U.S., your SAT score is hugely important. But what does it *really* measure? Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The SAT college extrance exam is a gatekeeper of opportunity. But this wasn't always the case. Here are some sources I found useful when reporting out this piece: * The Big Test is a well known book written by Nicholas Lemann, but a few years before he published this in 1999, he wrote this piece for The Atlantic: www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1995/09/the-great-sorting/376451/ * Here's the story behind the SAT overhaul: www.nytimes.com/2014/03/09/magazine/the-story-behind-the-sat-overhaul.html?_r=0 * This research paper, from Raj Chetty and colleagues, looks at the role of colleges in intergenerational mobility: www.nber.org/papers/w23618 * The SAT helps predict first-year GPA to an extent - but not for all students. We didn't include this in our video, but this piece covers the research that shows the SAT isn't predictive for a huge portion of students: www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/01/26/new-research-suggests-sat-under-or-overpredicts-first-year-grades-hundreds-thousands Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
India and Sri Lanka's violent fight over fish
India and Sri Lanka's violent fight over fish
2 months ago
How a maritime border created a conflict in the Indian Ocean. This season of Borders is presented by CuriosityStream. Watch thousands of documentaries for free for 31-days: www.curiositystream.com/Borders Join the Video Lab to help us make more Vox Borders! bit.ly/video-lab Follow the Vox Borders watch page: facebook.com/VoxBorders/ Follow Johnny on Instagram: instagram.com/johnnywharris/ Sign up for the Borders newsletter: www.vox.com/borders-email With original music by Tom Fox: tfbeats.com/ Fishing is the economic lifeline for villages in northern Sri Lanka. But after a decades long civil war, fishermen returned to find their fish stocks depleted - and they pointed the finger squarely at neighboring India. As Indian fishermen developed methods to increase hauls, and crossed a maritime border that was more permeable during the war, they depleted the fish stock for both sides. Now, the Sri Lankan Navy is retaliating with force, only making the relationship between the two communities that rely on these waters worse. This Vox Borders episode will look at how the drawing of a maritime border and lack of access to fish caused a conflict between two communities that used to live in harmony. Watch the first episode of Vox Borders: India -- usa-video.net/r5Ps1TZXAN8-video.html Watch all the episodes of Vox Borders: India here: usa-video.net/pl/PLJ8cMiYb3G5eLwIHwp0NAPJaLSo9qNexm Vox Borders is an international documentary series by Emmy-nominated producer Johnny Harris exploring life at the edge of nations. Start from the beginning. Watch all full episodes of Vox Borders on USa-video in one playlist: usa-video.net/-dVwv4wPA88-video.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Jacob Collier deconstructs a Stevie Wonder classic
Jacob Collier deconstructs a Stevie Wonder classic
2 months ago
Stevie Wonder's irresistible ode to jazz, explained Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Stevie Wonder is one of the most widely celebrated artists in history. His music is infectious, melodic, and thoughtfully inspired by the jazz musicians who came before him. In his legendary song "Sir Duke," Stevie paid homage to the late Duke Ellington and his other predecessors. Jacob Collier is a rising star in his own right and is Stevie Wonder's self-proclaimed greatest fan. Here, he breaks down the jazz influences and syncopations Stevie uses to create the magic that is "Sir Duke." If you’d like to check out more of Jacob’s music check out his USa-video channel here: usa-video.net/u/jacobcolliermusic Follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: facebook.com/VoxEarworm Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. And be sure to check out Earworm's complete first season here: bit.ly/2QCwhMH Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: Stevie Wonder's irresistible ode to jazz, explained Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How India runs the world's biggest election
How India runs the world's biggest election
2 months ago
900 million eligible voters need access to polling booths. This season of Borders is presented by CuriosityStream. Watch thousands of documentaries for free for 31-days: www.curiositystream.com/Borders Join the Video Lab to help us make more Vox Borders! bit.ly/video-lab Follow the Vox Borders watch page: facebook.com/VoxBorders/ Follow Johnny on Instagram: instagram.com/johnnywharris/ Sign up for the Borders newsletter: www.vox.com/borders-email With original music by Tom Fox: tfbeats.com/ Elections in India aren’t like others. India voted to pick its central government for the next five years throughout the spring of 2019. An eighth of the world’s entire population was eligible to vote in this election. That’s 900 million people, and more than 67 percent voted. India runs the world’s biggest elections, and officials put in a lot of effort to make this democratic exercise is as accessible as possible. This means they make sure everyone, even in the most remote locations, is near a polling booth - even if it means bringing voting machines to them by elephant. This Vox Borders episode looks at how India pulls off massive elections. Watch the first episode of Vox Borders: India -- usa-video.net/r5Ps1TZXAN8-video.html Watch all the episodes of Vox Borders: India here: usa-video.net/pl/PLJ8cMiYb3G5eLwIHwp0NAPJaLSo9qNexm Vox Borders is an international documentary series by Emmy-nominated producer Johnny Harris exploring life at the edge of nations. Start from the beginning. Watch all full episodes of Vox Borders on USa-video in one playlist: usa-video.net/-dVwv4wPA88-video.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why Iraq's great rivers are dying
Why Iraq's great rivers are dying
2 months ago
And the timing couldn't be worse. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Iraq gets almost all of its water from two rivers: The Tigris and the Euphrates. Both begin in Turkey and make their way down the entire length of the country, before emptying into the Persian Gulf. The problem is - they are drying up. There are two main reasons for this. The first is geographical: Since both rivers begin in Turkey, Iraq doesn’t have control of how much water it receives. In the last 30 years, Turkey, Syria, and Iran have been building hundreds of dams along both rivers. Now only a quarter of the Euphrates reaches Iraq. Secondly, Iraq has been stuck in conflict for the last 16 years. In each case, the delicate network of treatment plants, dams, canals, and pipes has been repeatedly destroyed and neglected. All of this has boiled over in the city of Basra - at Iraq’s southern tip. Last summer, after hundreds were poisoned by the water - riots erupted and were deeply destabilizing for the new Iraqi government. If Iraq is to rebuild, it needs to get fresh water to its people - a challenge that is getting harder every year. Through Vox Atlas, producer Sam Ellis demonstrates where conflicts occur on a map and the ways in which foreign policy shapes a region. Watch all the episodes here: bit.ly/2SThVsf Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
The problem with sex testing in sports
The problem with sex testing in sports
2 months ago
Caster Semenya’s court case is the latest chapter in a long and confusing history. Try Dashlane free here: www.dashlane.com/vox - Get 10% off now with my promo code: VOX This spring, the Court of Arbitration for Sport upheld rules imposed by the International Association of Athletic Federations (IAAF) limiting the participation of female athletes with high levels of testosterone. On the other side of the decision was Caster Semenya: a South African runner who has repeatedly been penalized by sports officials throughout her career. The IAAF has gone through many iterations of their female regulations throughout the past decade, and Caster Semenya has been targeted with each successive policy. Most recently, the regulation has been a testosterone limit of five nanomoles per liter. Throughout the past decade, the media has been following Semenya's story closely and shaping a narrative that is often misguided or inaccurate. In this video we piece together the underlying issues relevant to sex testing in sports and contextualize them within the long history of scrutinizing female athletes. By covering the controversy surrounding 2016 women’s 800 meters Olympic gold medalist Caster Semenya, along with historical events concerning Polish sprinter Ewa Klobukowska and Indian sprinter Dutee Chand, the goal is to help explain how athletic officials have repeatedly failed in their attempt to establish definitive sex testing regulations for female competitors. Sources: Sex, gender, DSD, and other terminology: www.familyfoundation.org/biological-sex-resources www.seattlechildrens.org/clinics/differences-sex-development/ interactadvocates.org/ www.nhs.uk/conditions/disorders-sex-development/ www.med.umich.edu/yourchild/topics/dsd.htm IAAF policy: www.iaaf.org/news/iaaf-news/iaaf-to-introduce-eligibility-rules-for-femal-1 www.iaaf.org/news/press-release/eligibility-regulations-for-female-classifica www.utpjournals.press/doi/pdf/10.3138/cbmh.28.2.339 medicine.yale.edu/rnacenter/article.aspx?id=3068 IAAF study: bjsm.bmj.com/content/51/17/1309 IAAF study criticism and research: www.sportsintegrityinitiative.com/scientific-inaccuracies-study-used-support-iaafs-dsd-regulations/ www.sportsintegrityinitiative.com/questions-remain-iaaf-differences-sex-development-regulations/ Testosterone research: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2917954 link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40318-019-00143-w Olympic data: www.olympic.org/women-in-sport/background/key-dates www.olympic.org/women-in-sport/background/statistics Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
These photos ended child labor in the US
These photos ended child labor in the US
2 months ago
Child labor was widely practiced until a photographer showed the public what it looked like. This video is presented by CuriosityStream: www.curiositystream.com/Vox Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The 1900 US Federal Census revealed that 1.75 million children under the age of 16, more than one in five, were gainfully employed. They worked all over the country in cotton mills, glass blowing factories, sardine canneries, farms, and even coal mines. In an effort to expose this exploitation of children, the National Child Labor Committee hired a photographer to travel around the country and investigate and report on the labor conditions of children. Lewis Wickes Hine photographed and interviewed kids, some as young as 4 years old, and published his findings in various Progressive magazines and newspapers. Once the public saw the plight of these children, state legislatures were pressured to pass bills regulating labor for workers under the age of 18, effectively bringing an end to child labor in the United States. See the entire collection of Lewis Hine's photos for the National Child Labor Committee here: www.loc.gov/collections/national-child-labor-committee/about-this-collection/ Darkroom is a series from Vox producer Coleman Lowndes that digs into stories of the past, one photograph at a time. Watch all the episodes here: bit.ly/321DvzO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The right way to kill a fish
The right way to kill a fish
2 months ago
The most popular way to kill fish isn’t great for the fish - or our taste buds. Ting Mobile is the smarter choice for affordable cell phone service. Get a $25 credit when you try Ting at vox.ting.com Become a Vox Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Most fish die the same way - slow suffocation in the open air. It’s easy for fishers, but it causes fish tons of stress, and floods their bodies with chemicals like cortisol, adrenaline, and lactic acid. Those chemicals make the fish taste bad, smell “fishy,” and rot quickly. But there's a better way: a four-step Japanese method called ikejime. It involves sharp knives. And a brain spike. We adapted this video from Vox’s Future Perfect podcast, which goes much more in depth on ikejime: www.vox.com/future-perfect/2018/11/14/18091698/future-perfect-podcast-killing-fish-ikejime-animal-welfare Cat Ferguson wrote a detailed article on the process at Topic: www.topic.com/how-to-kill-a-fish This article about fish and pain from the Smithsonian informed reporting: www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/fish-feel-pain-180967764/ And here’s a link to the Ike Jime Federation, where Andrew is the president: www.ikejimefederation.com/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How this border transformed a subcontinent  |  India & Pakistan
How this border transformed a subcontinent | India & Pakistan
2 months ago
The story of how a hastily-drawn line divided one people into two. This season of Borders is presented by CuriosityStream. Watch thousands of documentaries for free for 31-days: www.curiositystream.com/Borders Join the Video Lab to help us make more Vox Borders! bit.ly/video-lab Follow the Vox Borders watch page: facebook.com/VoxBorders/ Follow Johnny on Instagram: instagram.com/johnnywharris/ Sign up for the Borders newsletter: www.vox.com/borders-email With original music by Tom Fox: tfbeats.com/ The video conferencing session between the two schools was conducted between students of Gyan Mandir Public School (Delhi, India) and Adamjee Model School (Karachi, Pakistan). The session was coordinated by Ms Anju Anand and Ms Devika Mittal from Indian side and Mr Usama Palla and Ms Suraya Islam from Pakistan. We're grateful they let us drop by! The British tasked Cyril Radcliffe with the job of drawing a line to separate Punjab and Bengal provinces from India into East and West Pakistan. Muslims and Hindus weren’t the only ones being separated from each other. Sikhs and people from other faiths were affected as well. A Sikh pilgrimage was divided because of the new border, Punjabi people of all faiths were separated from each other, and a culture was ultimately divided. This Vox Borders episode looks at how the Radcliffe line changed Punjab and how communities are affected now. Watch all the episodes of Vox Borders: India here: usa-video.net/pl/PLJ8cMiYb3G5eLwIHwp0NAPJaLSo9qNexm To learn more about the colonial history of the subcontinent, watch our explainer on the role of Great Britain in shaping the histories of India and Pakistan: usa-video.net/OIVPi0bvmtI-video.html For more on the present relationship between India and Pakistan, watch our explainer on the conflict in Kashmir here: usa-video.net/cyayif_nla8-video.html Vox Borders is an international documentary series by Emmy-nominated producer Johnny Harris exploring life at the edge of nations. Start from the beginning. Watch all full episodes of Vox Borders on USa-video in one playlist: usa-video.net/-dVwv4wPA88-video.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Hong Kong’s huge protests, explained
Hong Kong’s huge protests, explained
2 months ago
The people of Hong Kong are protesting in record-breaking numbers. Thanks to Dashlane for sponsoring us - Try Dashlane free here: www.dashlane.com/vox and get 10% off now with promo code VOX. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Correction at 7:48: The protester says “They are not doing this for themselves, but for the future of Hong Kong.” Hundreds of thousands of Hongkongers have taken to the streets to protest a controversial extradition bill that could send Hong Kong residents to mainland China to be tried in court. Hong Kong’s Chief Executive, Carrie Lam, says the bill is meant to prevent Hong Kong from becoming a safe haven for fugitives. But its opponents fear that Hong Kong would be exposed to China’s flawed judicial system, which would lead to further erasure of the city’s judicial independence. At first Lam was determined to move forward with the bill. But after a series of massive protests, she announced she would “indefinitely suspend” the bill. But protesters aren't accepting the suspension, and have started demanding its complete withdrawal. They've also begun calling for Lam’s resignation. But this rise in tensions is about a lot more than a bill. To understand why this bill hits a nerve with Hongkongers, it's important to understand Hong Kong’s relationship with China - and exactly how the bill would tip the scales in China’s favor. Watch this video to understand the news coming out of Hong Kong and the history that led up to this moment. For more watch Episode one of our Vox Borders Hong Kong episodes here: usa-video.net/MQyxG4vTyZ8-video.html And for even more context on Hong Kong’s history with Britain you can watch another one of our Vox Borders Hong Kong episodes here: usa-video.net/StW7oGSR_Mg-video.html If you want to get real nerdy you can read Hong Kong’s Basic Law (their mini Constitution) here: www.basiclaw.gov.hk/en/basiclawtext/index.html You can also read the Sino-British Joint Declaration that defined Hong Kong when the British handed it back to China in 1997 here: www.gov.cn/english/2007-06/14/content_649468.htm And the extradition law introduced in Hong Kong that has sparked massive protests here: www.legco.gov.hk/yr18-19/english/hc/papers/hc20190412ls-65-e.pdf Here is a piece reported by the New York Times on the latest from Carrie Lam, Hong Kong's leader: www.nytimes.com/2019/06/10/world/asia/hong-kong-carrie-lam-extradition.html Here are some additional resources regarding Hong Kong’s democracy and political make-up: sites.duke.edu/corporations/2018/01/29/the-mirror-colonial-britain-and-chinas-rationale-for-hong-kongs-functional-constituency/ www.cfr.org/backgrounder/democracy-hong-kong books.google.com/books?id=ZDubDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA202&lpg=PA202&dq=Reunification,+Patriotism,+and+Political+Disorder:+From+1997+to+2017+%22underground+front%22&source=bl&ots=vn4zdV2FSi&sig=ACfU3U2yyYBTZ0hFfWC6y9oYS4YzxY6UDg&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjVgcDv5eziAhXQg-AKHV4EB9sQ6AEwAXoECAkQAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false And finally, you can also find our latest articles covering the most recent developments here: www.vox.com/2019/6/18/18683582/hong-kong-extradition-bill-protests-china www.vox.com/world/2019/6/16/18680897/huge-hong-kong-protests-continue-after-the-government-postpones-controversial-billwww.vox.com/2019/6/11/18661007/hong-kong-protest-2019-china-extradition www.vox.com/world/2019/6/9/18658650/hong-kong-protest-march-china-extradition-bill-2019 Thanks for watching! And let us know what you think of this video in the comments! Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
When white supremacists overthrew a government
When white supremacists overthrew a government
3 months ago
The hidden history of an American coup. Join the Vox Video Lab for a behind-the-scenes look into Ranjani's reporting process and to support future episodes of Missing Chapter: bit.ly/video-lab. Correction at 7:23: Cynthia's ancestors lived in Wilmington, not her descendants. In November 1898, in Wilmington, North Carolina, a mob of 2,000 white men expelled black and white political leaders, destroyed the property of the city’s black residents, and killed dozens--if not hundreds--of people. How did such a turn of events change the course of the city? For decades, the story of this violence was buried, while the perpetrators were cast as heroes. Yet its impacts resonate across the state to this day. In the new Vox series Missing Chapter, Vox Senior Producer Ranjani Chakraborty revisits underreported and often overlooked moments from the past to give context to the present. Join her as she covers the histories that are often left out of our textbooks. Our first season tackles stories of racial injustice, political conflicts, even the hidden history of US medical experimentation. Have an idea for a story that Ranjani should investigate for Missing Chapter? Send it to her via this form! bit.ly/2RhjxMy Sign up for the Missing Chapter newsletter to stay up to date with the series: vox.com/missing-chapter Watch Ranjani's earlier video on the hidden history of the Tulsa Massacre: usa-video.net/x-ItsPBTFO0-video.html For more reading, check out the links below: The final report from the state commission on 1898 Wilmington: www.ncdcr.gov/learn/resources-topic/1898-wilmington-race-riot-commission An in-depth documentary about the events of 1898: wilmingtononfire.com/about The News and Observer’s recent coverage of 1898: www.newsobserver.com/article192293519.html and media2.newsobserver.com/content/media/2010/5/3/ghostsof1898.pdf Explore the full Missing Chapter playlist, including episodes, a creator Q&A, and more! usa-video.net/pl/PLJ8cMiYb3G5fR2kt0L4Nihvel4pEDw9od Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Vox Borders: India is coming next week!
Vox Borders: India is coming next week!
2 months ago
Vox Borders: India launches Wednesday June 26, 2019! Join the Video Lab for members-only Borders extras: bit.ly/video-lab Follow Johnny on Instagram: instagram.com/johnnywharris/ Sign up for the Borders newsletter: www.vox.com/borders-email Follow Vox Borders on Facebook: facebook.com/VoxBorders Get ready for a new season of Vox Borders! This time, we're heading to India. We'll have a whole new spate of videos examining the human impact of the lines on a map, straight from the subcontinent. We're excited to share with you these episodes that Johnny and his team have been working so hard on. They start next week, June 26th, and new videos will publish weekly on Wednesdays. If you want to stay up to date with Johnny's travels and the Vox Borders series, check out one (or all!) of the ways to follow his work, that Johnny mentions in this video. Vox Borders is an international documentary series by Emmy-nominated producer Johnny Harris exploring life at the edge of nations. For more, visit vox.com/borders. Start from the beginning. Watch all full episodes of Vox Borders on USa-video in one playlist: usa-video.net/-dVwv4wPA88-video.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Astronauts left poop on the moon. We should go get it.
Astronauts left poop on the moon. We should go get it.
3 months ago
What astronaut diapers can teach us about the origins of life. Try Dashlane free here: www.dashlane.com/vox Get 10% off now with my promo code: VOX Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab We released a members-only extra from this video, where Bridgett, one of our team's incredible story editors unboxes the props we used for this shoot. It's our first Vox Unboxing, and you can watch it by becoming a member and following this link: usa-video.net/bNMxRoybHOQ-video.html. Astronauts landed on the moon for the first time 50 years ago, and they left a bunch of stuff up there - including their poop. Scientists want to know: Is there anything alive in there? Our poop is over 50 percent bacteria, and we don’t know if any of that bacteria can survive in the moon’s inhospitable environment. But if we go back to check it out, that poop could answer some big scientific questions - including how life started in the broader universe. Brian’s full article on moon poop: www.vox.com/science-and-health/2019/3/22/18236125/apollo-moon-poop-mars-science Here’s a full list of all the stuff astronauts have left on the moon: history.nasa.gov/FINAL%20Catalogue%20of%20Manmade%20Material%20on%20the%20Moon.pdf A 2016 paper detailing the bacteria in our poop: bionumbers.hms.harvard.edu/bionumber.aspx?id=112998 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The weird rule that broke American politics
The weird rule that broke American politics
3 months ago
The filibuster started as an accident. Today it lets the losers rule Congress. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The US Senate is supposed to pass laws. But today, it’s broken. And it’s broken because of something called the filibuster, which has been part of Senate tradition for over 200 years. But the filibuster came into being by accident. And today, some politicians are suggesting we should get rid of it entirely. Further reading: * My colleague Matt Yglesias does a great job breaking down the 2020 Democrats’ debate over the filibuster: www.vox.com/2019/3/5/18241447/filibuster-reform-explained-warren-booker-sanders * Ezra Klein dispels some myths about the filibuster: www.vox.com/2015/5/27/18089312/myths-about-the-filibuster * The book “Politics of Principle?” from Sarah Binder and Steven Smith from the Brookings Institution, really helped me understand the Senate filibuster: www.brookings.edu/book/politics-or-principle/ * The book “Filibustering: A Political History of Obstruction in the House and Senate” from Gregory Koger, a University of Miami political scientist, puts the filibuster in a broader context: www.amazon.com/Filibustering-Political-Obstruction-American-Politics/dp/0226449653 * Lastly, this article from the Stanford Law Review answered some basic questions about the Senate filibuster: scholarship.law.duke.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1682&context=faculty_scholarship;The "Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: How the filibuster broke the US senate Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Missing Chapter: A new series about hidden histories
Missing Chapter: A new series about hidden histories
3 months ago
Join the Vox Video Lab for a behind-the-scenes look into Ranjani's reporting process and to support future episodes of Missing Chapter: bit.ly/video-lab. You can watch the first episode of Missing Chapter here: usa-video.net/LVQomlXMeek-video.html Help us continue to explain today's crucial issues for USa-video, by becoming a Video Lab member. Your membership also helps us make even more of the Vox videos you love. In the new Vox series Missing Chapter, Vox Senior Producer Ranjani Chakraborty revisits underreported and often overlooked moments from the past to give context to the present. Join her as she covers the histories that are often left out of our textbooks. Our first season tackles stories of racial injustice, political conflicts, even the hidden history of US medical experimentation. Have an idea for a story that Ranjani should investigate for Missing Chapter? Send it to her via this form! bit.ly/2RhjxMy Sign up for the Missing Chapter newsletter to stay up to date with the series: vox.com/missing-chapter Watch Ranjani's earlier video on the hidden history of the Tulsa Massacre: usa-video.net/x-ItsPBTFO0-video.html Explore the full Missing Chapter playlist, including episodes, a creator Q&A, and more! usa-video.net/pl/PLJ8cMiYb3G5fR2kt0L4Nihvel4pEDw9od Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The Green New Deal, explained
The Green New Deal, explained
3 months ago
What's actually in the Green New Deal? Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The Green New Deal is an ambitious plan to fight the effects of climate change. It’s the only American plan that actually acknowledges the size of the impending crisis. And it contains some difficult truths that we might not want to hear. Read the Green New Deal resolution here: ocasio-cortez.house.gov/sites/ocasio-cortez.house.gov/files/Resolution%20on%20a%20Green%20New%20Deal.pdf For additional context I recommend this piece by Vox’s Umair Irfan on the United Nations climate report, where the world’s best climatologists tell us how urgent of a problem this is: www.vox.com/2018/10/8/17948832/climate-change-global-warming-un-ipcc-report This piece from Vox’s David Roberts, shows that world leaders really aren’t taking this urgency seriously. www.vox.com/2016/10/4/13118594/2-degrees-no-more-fossil-fuels Finally, you should read this explainer of the Green New Deal, followed by this story (in list form) by Hannah Northey: www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2018/12/21/18144138/green-new-deal-alexandria-ocasio-cortez www.eenews.net/stories/1060106501 I also enjoyed this piece, from Kate Aronoff of the Intercept, that imagines a world after the Green New Deal: theintercept.com/2018/12/05/green-new-deal-proposal-impacts/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
New York is building a wall to hold back the ocean
New York is building a wall to hold back the ocean
3 months ago
Climate change is leading to increasingly violent storms. Can seawalls hold back floods? Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Staten Island recently received funding for a nearly 5-mile-long seawall to protect its coast. But the plan raises a lot of questions. We’re living in a dangerously dynamic world: Hurricanes are getting worse, wildfires are rampant in California, extreme heat is melting roads in India, and sea levels continue to rise. Will a wall really be enough to protect our coastal cities? Alissa Walker from Curbed talked to us about how it’s too late to stop the changing climate, but not too late to change how we think about infrastructure. Check out some further reading from our sister site, Curbed.com: www.curbed.com/2017/2/15/14616928/trump-nasa-climate-change-california ny.curbed.com/2019/4/25/18515213/staten-island-usace-seawall-climate-change-photo-essay For more research and climate-related content: www.c2es.org/content/hurricanes-and-climate-change/ climate.nasa.gov/vital-signs/sea-level/ www.reuters.com/article/us-japan-disaster-seawalls/seven-years-after-tsunami-japanese-live-uneasily-with-seawalls-idUSKCN1GL0DK And for more on seawalls: www.scientificamerican.com/article/after-a-14-billion-upgrade-new-orleans-levees-are-sinking/ news.mongabay.com/2018/06/on-indias-kerala-coast-a-man-made-solution-exacerbates-a-natural-problem/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The race to save endangered foods
The race to save endangered foods
3 months ago
Wild animals aren’t the only ones facing extinction. Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab We’re letting foods we’ve eaten for thousands of years disappear from farmers’ fields, and from our plates. Saving them isn’t just a matter of cultural preservation. In the next 30 years, we’re going to need to learn how to feed more people on a hotter planet, and the more genetic varieties we lose, the harder it’ll be to adapt. To learn more about the foods facing extinction in the US and around the world, check out the Ark of Taste, a project of Slow Food USA. Journalist Mark Shapiro’s book, Seeds of Resistance, goes into much more detail about the risk that genetic homogeneity poses to our food supply. He also profiles some of the efforts, many led by indigenous communities, to preserve older seed varieties. For more on seed relabeling, check out the Farmers Business Network’s 2018 Seed Relabeling Report. The chart on declining global yields for corn, wheat, and rice comes from an article in the academic journal Disasters and Climate Change Economics from agricultural economists Mekbib G. Haile, Tesfamicheal Wossen, Kindie Tesfaye, and Joachim von Braun. Their prediction model takes into account both climate change and price volatility, which is why their estimates are higher than those of some other researchers. Special thanks to Marie Haga of Global Crop Diversity Trust, and Marleni Ramírez of Bioversity International for sharing their knowledge with me. Sources: - www.slowfoodusa.org/ark-of-taste - www.amazon.com/dp/B01NA6SQFF/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 - use.farmersbusinessnetwork.com/seed-relabeling-report-2018 - link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s41885-017-0005-2 - www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5584412/ - www.croptrust.org/ - www.bioversityinternational.org/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
This photo almost started a nuclear war
This photo almost started a nuclear war
3 months ago
The Cuban Missile Crisis began with a photograph. Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab The Cuban Missile Crisis was the closest the world has ever come to all-out nuclear war, and it all started with a photo. On October 15th, 1962, Dino Brugioni, a senior analyst at the newly-formed National Photographic Interpretation Center, identified missile trailers measuring approximately 65 feet in an aerial reconnaissance photo. Those trailers were a match for the Soviet SS-4, a medium-range ballistic missile with a range that would cover a huge amount of the United States, including Washington, DC. Upon seeing this photo, US President John F. Kennedy ordered more aerial recon flights, conducted by the CIA using the high-altitude U-2 spy plane. He used these photographs to make a plan of action about confronting the Soviet Union over their secretive installation of offensive missiles in Cuba. Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: The photo that prevented a nuclear war Darkroom is a series from Vox producer Coleman Lowndes that digs into stories of the past, one photograph at a time. Watch all the episodes here: bit.ly/321DvzO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
You’re watching Fox News. You just don’t know it.
You’re watching Fox News. You just don’t know it.
3 months ago
Fox News was created to push right-wing nonsense to the mainstream, and now there’s no escape. Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Read more about the hack gap on Vox.com: www.vox.com/2018/10/23/18004478/hack-gap-explained We tend to assume that if a story is being covered by major news networks, it’s because journalists have decided that the story is important. But thanks to Fox News, that’s not always true. The network was specifically created to generate scandals that would hurt Democrats and help Republicans. And because most major networks pay attention to what happens in conservative media, those pseudoscandals end up creeping into mainstream coverage. The result is a media ecosystem that advantages Republicans by paying disproportionate attention to right-wing talking points. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why your allergies get worse every year
Why your allergies get worse every year
3 months ago
The Pollen-ocalypse is coming. This video is presented by Hover. Get 10% off your first purchase by going to hover.com/vox Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Allergy season is upon us once again. And if it seems like your allergies are getting worse year after year, it’s not just your imagination. Pollen is a fine powder produced as part of the sexual reproductive cycle of many varieties of plants. As climate change warms the planet, pollen production is ramping up. And that’s becoming a problem, whether you suffer from seasonal allergies - or not. Sources & further reading: Why allergy season gets worse every year www.vox.com/2019/4/8/18300342/pollen-season-2019-allergies-climate-change Effects on pollen allergies on emergency room visits agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GH000153 Effects of temperature on pollen production in Northern Hemisphere www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2542519619300154?via%3Dihub&for-guid=a3a12ea2-bd65-e711-b65f-90b11c343abd&Climate%20Point& National Wildlife Federation report www.aafa.org/media/1634/extreme-allergies-global-warming-report-2010.pdf Climate Central report - Effect of CO2 on pollen production www.climatecentral.org/gallery/graphics/more-co2-more-pollen Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: Climate change is making allergy season worse Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why drugs cost more in America
Why drugs cost more in America
4 months ago
How an EpiPen can cost $300 in the US and $38 in the UK. This video is presented by CuriosityStream: www.curiositystream.com/Vox Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Prescription drugs cost more in the United States than anywhere else in the world. One big reason why is America’s particular system for how drugs get to patients, which is unlike almost any other country’s. But it’s also because the American prescription drug market is so profitable that the money it generates powers the entire global pharmaceutical industry. Check out our other video, on how Americans got stuck with endless drug advertisements: usa-video.net/_5jnn1AIt7Q-video.html Check out more of Sarah Kliff’s reporting: www.vox.com/science-and-health/2016/11/30/12945756/prescription-drug-prices-explained And the Commonwealth Fund’s research on US drug prices: www.commonwealthfund.org/publications/issue-briefs/2017/oct/paying-prescription-drugs-around-world-why-us-outlier Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How Game of Thrones uses costumes to show power
How Game of Thrones uses costumes to show power
4 months ago
Costume design links Sansa Stark and Cersei Lannister. This video is presented by Skillshare. Click here to get your first two months of Skillshare for free: skl.sh/vox2 Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Sansa Stark and Cersei Lannister are two of Game of Thrones’ most recognizable enemies. But despite being on opposite sides of Westeros, their costumes have a ton in common. From the very beginning of the show, their outfits have been mirrors. When they’re both oppressed and weak in the earlier seasons, they’re dressed in loose, pastel clothing signaling their lack of power. As the show moves on and their plots become more complicated, they don “survival camouflage,” clothes used to mask secrets and blend in with enemies. And when both women begin to assert the power of their houses, Lannister lions and Stark wolves become the focal point of their clothes. In the show’s final season, Sansa and Cersei default to military-style accents on their gowns as they prep for battle. Those high-necked dresses evoke images of each family’s armor - full of defensive details like epaulets and draped chains. And while both leaders have learned different lessons about war and family, it’s safe to say their outfit parallels are there for a reason. Read more about the costumes of these powerful women on vox.com: www.vox.com/the-goods/2019/4/19/18484819/game-of-thrones-daenerys-targaryen-costumes-michele-clapton www.vox.com/the-goods/2019/4/9/18300675/game-of-thrones-cersei-lannister-costumes-michele-clapton www.vox.com/the-goods/2019/4/3/18287327/game-of-thrones-sansa-stark-costumes-michele-clapton Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: How Game of Thrones uses costume design to show power Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The real experiments that inspired Frankenstein
The real experiments that inspired Frankenstein
4 months ago
When Mary Shelley published her iconic novel in 1818, raising the dead seemed to be the near-future. Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein has been reimagined onscreen hundreds of times and is a staple of pop culture. The prevailing takeaway is science-gone-wrong and the dangers of pursuing the unnatural. But contemporary readers, surrounded by Enlightenment-era scientific breakthroughs that were beginning to shift the definition of death, would have read the story as frighteningly plausible. Electricity was being used in a scientific practice called “galvanism,” which seemed to show some promise in reanimating body parts of recently dead animals and humans. Shelley even references galvanism in the 1831 edition of the book, citing it as an example of how this experiment could be a possibility. Watch the pilot episode of History Club here: usa-video.net/GeYyllI-Nhs-video.html Sources: Sharon Ruston’s “The Science of Life and Death in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein:” publicdomainreview.org/2015/11/25/the-science-of-life-and-death-in-mary-shelleys-frankenstein/ Kathryn Harkup’s “Making the Monster:” www.bloomsbury.com/uk/making-the-monster-9781472933737/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
China's secret internment camps
China's secret internment camps
4 months ago
...and the internet detectives working to find them. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab China has been quietly detaining its population of Uighurs, the country’s Muslim minority, in internment camps. First-hand accounts from inside the camps paint a brutal picture of torture and political indoctrination. At first, China denied the existence of these camps and tried to cover them up. But as a network of academics and activists uncovered evidence of the camps' locations, and the reality of what’s going on inside, China changed its story. Read more about about China’s crackdown on Muslims from Sigal Samuel on Vox: www.vox.com/future-perfect/2019/3/30/18287532/china-uighur-muslims-internment-camps-turkey Further reading: China’s brutal crackdown on the Uighur Muslim minority, explained www.vox.com/2018/8/15/17684226/uighur-china-camps-united-nations China’s final solution in Xinjiang www.hoover.org/research/chinas-final-solution-xinjiang Migration and inequality in Xinjiang geog.ucla.edu/sites/default/files/users/fan/403.pdf www.wsj.com/articles/SB124811293085765891 Tracking China’s Muslim Gulag www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/muslims-camps-china/ List of re-education camps in Xinjiang medium.com/@shawnwzhang/list-of-re-education-camps-in-xinjiang-%E6%96%B0%E7%96%86%E5%86%8D%E6%95%99%E8%82%B2%E9%9B%86%E4%B8%AD%E8%90%A5%E5%88%97%E8%A1%A8-99720372419c Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The traffic solution most cities haven't tried
The traffic solution most cities haven't tried
4 months ago
Congestion pricing works - just look at London. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo recently announced a plan to bring congestion pricing to New York City. The goal is to raise money for the city’s crumbling public transit system and reclaim the dangerously busy city streets. But what is congestion pricing, and can it actually solve all our transit woes? We took a look at London, a city that enacted a congestion charge in 2003, to see some of the benefits. Check out the video above to learn more. For further reading look to our sister site, Curbed: www.curbed.com/ www.curbed.com/search?q=congestion+pricing For information on New York’s potential earnings and benefits: www.hntb.com/HNTB/media/HNTBMediaLibrary/Home/Fix-NYC-Panel-Report.pdf And a closer look at how much money is wasted sitting in traffic: pfnyc.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/2018-01-Congestion-Pricing.pdf Finally - Check out this article by Nicole Badstuber on how London congestion pricing has started to level out and the plans the city has in place to bring revenue back up: www.citylab.com/transportation/2018/04/londons-congestion-charge-needs-updating/557699/ Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: How London is fighting its nightmare traffic Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The truth behind the TV show Cops
The truth behind the TV show Cops
4 months ago
The longest-running reality show in The US. Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to the "Running From Cops" podcast: www.topic.com/runningfromcops “When it premiered, “Cops” was one of the first reality television shows and it has been broadcasting continuously since 1989. In this video, we worked with the podcast “Running From Cops” to understand why the show has stayed on TV for so long. At the time it was selected for development by Fox executive Stephen Chao, the writer’s strike of 1988 had created a desire for unscripted television that didn’t require hiring union talent. But once “Cops” was on the air, it was the vision of “Cops” creator John Langley that would make the show last. He understood that the show presented a new opportunity for law enforcement agencies and it was his approach to making “Cops” that has kept police interested in appearing on the show. While “Cops” no longer has the high TV ratings it garnered during the nineties, it has been a persistent presence on television and it has spawned several imitators, including the very popular show “Live PD”. Like “Cops”, these shows use variations of a reality format developed by “Cops” that features police performing their daily duties. The stripped-down format has remained nearly the same since the show began in 1989 and during the thirty years since “Cops” has had the same agreement with police that agree to appear on the reality show. To learn what that agreement is, make sure to watch the video above. To learn even more about “Cops”, make sure to listen to “Running From Cops”: a podcast that investigates various aspects of “Cops” and examines its cultural impact on policing on America. Sources: 2018 ratings (“Roseanne” no longer running): www.businessinsider.com/most-popular-tv-shows-of-the-year-nielsen-ratings-2018-5 www.thedailybeast.com/game-of-thrones-finale-2018-how-much-will-it-cost deadline.com/2018/12/live-pd-is-most-viewed-show-of-2018-on-ott-vod-and-dvr-survey-1202526855/ Newspapers: “New York Times”, January 7, 1989 “Pittsburgh Post-Gazette” March 11, 1989 “Arizona Republic” March 10, 1989 “The Californian” November 24, 2015 “Cops” filming locations: www.imdb.com/title/tt0096563/locations www.episodedata.com/ www.themoviedb.org/tv/3670-cops/seasons “Cops” viewership: “Law Enforcement and Crime on ‘Cops’ and ‘World’s Wildest Police Videos’: Anecdotal Form and the Justification of Racial Profiling” Theodore O. Prosise, & Ann Johnson p. 74 www.uky.edu/~addesa01/documents/Cops.pdf tvseriesfinale.com/tv-show/cops Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
This lake now has legal rights, just like you
This lake now has legal rights, just like you
4 months ago
Why the “rights of nature” could be the next frontier for environmentalism. This video is presented by CuriosityStream: www.curiositystream.com/Vox Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Read more about the movement behind the Lake Erie Bill of Rights: www.vox.com/future-perfect/2019/2/26/18241904/lake-erie-legal-rights-personhood-nature-environment-toledo-ohio The Lake Erie Bill of Rights is the first law of its kind in the United States. In February of 2019, the residents of Toledo, Ohio voted to give Lake Erie's entire ecosystem legal rights. That means any citizen of Toledo, if they have credible evidence that a corporation or government is harming the lake, can file a lawsuit on behalf of Lake Erie in court. The Lake Erie Bill of Rights is part of a larger movement to give legal rights to mountains, rivers, forests, and other natural objects. The citizens of these communities -- from Pennsylvania, to Ecuador, to New Zealand -- argue that because their long-term survival is dependent on the health of their natural surroundings, anything that harms the lakes, rivers, or forests they depend on should be considered a legal harm. It’s a totally new way of approaching the law, and it could change the very nature of our relationship with the natural world. This is how one community in Ohio started what they hope will be a nationwide movement. Further Reading: The National Center for Water Quality at Heidelberg University in Tiffin, Ohio has a great site (lakeeriealgae.com/) on harmful algae blooms. This feature from Belt Magazine (beltmag.com/big-ag-vs-lake-erie/) goes into more detail about some of the other agricultural practices that contribute to Lake Erie’s harmful algal blooms. This in-depth explainer (civileats.com/2019/04/09/lake-erie-was-granted-legal-rights-could-it-change-the-farm-pollution-debate/) from Civil Eats goes into more detail about the rise of CAFOs in the Western Lake Erie Basin. Ohio Sea Grant (ohioseagrant.osu.edu/research/issues/habs) is another excellent resource for learning about harmful algae blooms. Pam Taylor’s group, Environmentally Concerned Citizens of South Central Michigan, published a report in collaboration with the Sierra Club (www.sierraclub.org/michigan/follow-manure-factory-farms-and-lake-erie-algal-crisis) on the impact of manure spreading in the Western Lake Erie Basin. If you want to learn more about how larger industrial farm operations view the issue, this blog post (ofbf.org/2019/02/27/farm-bureau-support-farmers-legal-action-lake-erie-bill-of-rights/) from the Ohio Farm Bureau outlines why they’re fighting the Lake Erie Bill of Rights in court. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why disco made pop songs longer
Why disco made pop songs longer
4 months ago
Disco, DJs, and the impact of the 12-inch single. Try Dashlane here: dashlane.com/vox. Get 10% off now with promo code: VOX Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab In the early 1970s, a musical sensation took over New York City. It was called Disco. Before Disco became synonymous with Saturday Night Fever, Rod Stewart, and celebrity-fueled parties, it was an underground movement powered by the innovations of young DJs challenging themselves and each other to throw the city’s most adventurous dance parties. By 1973, their influence as musical taste makers became apparent, and a handful of unconventional dance tracks became pop crossover hits. With barely any radio airplay, songs like "Love Theme" and "Girl You Need a Change of Mind" became defining tracks of the disco era. These songs were repetitive, hypnotic, and funky, and they were also pretty long compared to other pop hits. That presented a problem for DJs using 7-inch 45rpm singles, which fit only 3:30 minutes of quality audio on them, during their night-long sets. They needed a vinyl record that could make their most popular tracks sound powerful on a dance floor and last the whole night. In 1976, an accidental studio discovery by Disco pioneer Tom Moulton provided the solution: A 12-inch single. By stretching one song across 12 inches of vinyl, a format typically reserved for full-length albums, those extended dance tracks had room to breath. By the 1980s, the 12-inch single dominated pop music. It not only changed the sound of records, it allowed for music producers to experiment with length and structure. SOURCES: While I dug through hundreds of pages of billboard charts and oral histories of the disco era to research and write this piece a few select sources proved incredibly helpful and they are linked below. I highly recommend checking them out if you want to learn more about this story. Books: Last Night a DJ Saved My Life by Bill Brewster Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-1979 by Tim Lawrence Articles: Mix Mag’s collection of stories on Disco and I Feel Love mixmag.net/feature/the-master-patrick-cowley-created-the-definitive-i-feel-love-remix Red Bull Music Academy’s Disco story archive: daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/disco-collection Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: The disco invention that changed pop music Follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: facebook.com/VoxEarworm And be sure to check out Earworm's complete first season here: bit.ly/2QCwhMH Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H This video is sponsored by Dashlane.
The goose that conquered America
The goose that conquered America
4 months ago
The Canada goose is a nuisance. But you might not realize how it got that way. Start listening with a 30-day Audible trial and your first audiobook plus two Audible Originals are free. Visit audible.com/vox or text VOX to 500-500 Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores the poop-filled history of the Canada goose - and the way people transformed it from migratory wonder to public nuisance. If you’ve played on a soccer field or strolled past a golf course in the United States, you’ve doubtless seen gaggles of Canada geese terrorizing the public space. These geese were actually put here by state agencies in the 1960s, '70s, and '80s as part of public programs to create Canada goose populations after nearly hunting the bird to extinction. Because these birds are all protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, it proves surprisingly difficult to get the geese to leave. There are some methods of geese removal, like egg oiling, or addling, that stop new geese from hatching. It’s a lot of effort, but it works. Still, these Canada geese illustrate some of the unintended consequences that happened when people tried to foster flocks in the last half-century. Further Reading: Home grown honkers was a definitive guide to goose raising. You can find information about it here, and some used copies are available online: pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/93780 Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s bird guide is an invaluable resource to learn the basics about all birds, including the Canada goose: www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canada_Goose/ Many state agencies have written histories of their geese programs, but this Federal Impact Statement from 2002 is the best option for an overall picture: books.google.com/books?id=VzA3AQAAMAAJ&dq=canada%20goose%20history%20extinction&pg=PP2#v=onepage&q=canada%20goose%20history%20extinction&f=false Harold Hanson’s book, The Giant Canada Goose, chronicles the rediscovery of a species once thought extinct (as well as some breeding advice): books.google.com/books/about/The_Giant_Canada_Goose.html?id=EzXxAAAAMAAJ These bird population studies give you a picture of changing bird populations over the past 50 years: www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/tr2015/trend2015_v3.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The first faked photograph
The first faked photograph
5 months ago
In 1839, Hippolyte Bayard invented photography. And nobody cared. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab People usually associate the birth of photography with Louis Daguerre’s Daguerreotype. His process became the first widespread method of photography after France revealed it to the world on August 19, 1839. But there were actually multiple inventors of photography, and one of them was an amateur French tinkerer named Hippolyte Bayard. Even before Daguerre’s process was revealed, Bayard had achieved photographic results. However, François Arago, the chair of the French Academy of Sciences, overlooked Bayard’s accomplishment and elevated Daguerre’s instead. And as a protest to this perceived injustice, Bayard took a self-portrait depicting himself as an unidentified man in the Paris Morgue who took his own life. This image is not only the first staged photo, it’s also an early example of photography depicting something non-literal and symbolic, laying the groundwork for the medium to be used as a form of creative expression. Bayard's photographs at the French Society of Photography: www.sfp.asso.fr/photographie/index.php?/search/76 Sources: The Drowned Inventor, Jillian Lerner: www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03087298.2014.939825?journalCode=thph20& The Impossible Photograph, Michal Sapir: muse.jhu.edu/article/20909 The New History of Photography, Michal Frizot: www.scribd.com/doc/210934705/The-New-History-of-Photography-Michel-Frizot (If you or someone you know is considering self-harm, please seek help through the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.) Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: Why this photography pioneer faked his own death Darkroom is a series from Vox producer Coleman Lowndes that digs into stories of the past, one photograph at a time. Watch all the episodes here: bit.ly/321DvzO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why measles is back in the US
Why measles is back in the US
5 months ago
Almost all US states allow parents to opt their children out of vaccinations. This video is presented by Skillshare. Click here to get your first two months of Skillshare for free: skl.sh/vox2 Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Measles is back in the United States, and to understand why, you have to understand where. When anti-vaccination misinformation leads to a drop in the number of children immunized, a community can lose its “herd immunity.” This happens most often in small, tight-knit communities, in which measles can spread like wildfire. 75% of all recent measles cases have happened in those types of communities. In order for everyone to be protected from measles, all people who can get vaccinated need to. But most states allow parents to opt out of vaccinating their children for any philosophical reason - and that’s allowing measles to make a comeback. You can read more about measles outbreaks among close communities here: www.vox.com/2019/3/19/18263688/measles-outbreak-2019-clark-county And learn more about recent measles outbreaks from the CDC: www.cdc.gov/measles/cases-outbreaks.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What DNA ancestry tests can - and can’t - tell you
What DNA ancestry tests can — and can’t — tell you
5 months ago
I took a DNA ancestry test. It didn’t tell me where my ancestors came from… Subscribe to our channel! bit.ly/video-lab At-home DNA ancestry tests have become hugely popular in recent years. More than 26 million have taken one of these tests. If their marketing is to be believed, they can help you learn where your DNA comes from, and even where your ancestors lived. But the information that can be inferred from your DNA is actually much more limited than testing companies are letting on. And that has lead consumers to misinterpret their results - which is having negative consequences. Further reading: The limits of ancestry DNA tests, explained www.vox.com/science-and-health/2019/1/28/18194560/ancestry-dna-23-me-myheritage-science-explainer Was I part British, part Dutch, a little bit Jewish? The oddness of DNA tests. www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/was-i-part-british-part-dutch-a-little-bit-jewish-the-oddness-of-dna-tests/2018/11/02/ed51b4c0-d090-11e8-83d6-291fcead2ab1_story.html?.6a4541a06fed White nationalists are flocking to genetic ancestry tests - with surprising results www.scientificamerican.com/article/white-nationalists-are-flocking-to-genetic-ancestry-tests-with-surprising-results/ Direct-to-consumer racial admixture tests and beliefs about essential racial differences journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0190272514529439 The human genome diversity panel browser hgdp.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/gbrowse/HGDP/?name=SLC24A5 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The real reason Boeing's new plane crashed twice
The real reason Boeing's new plane crashed twice
5 months ago
This isn’t just a computer bug. It’s a scandal. Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Two Boeing airplanes have fallen out of the air and crashed in the past six months. On the surface, this is a technical failure. But the real story is about a company's desire to beat their rival. Read about Boeing's efforts to get the 737 Max reinstated for flight here: www.vox.com/2019/4/5/18296646/boeing-737-max-mcas-software-update Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How Norway designed a more humane prison
How Norway designed a more humane prison
5 months ago
There’s a better way to design prison architecture. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Halden Prison in Norway looks sort of like a fancy dorm room or a hotel - much different than the barbed wire and cramped cells we often associate with prison design. Its look is all part of a plan to create a more humane prison, one where the architecture isn’t part of the punishment. Most prisons around the world are consolidated into one single building. This style makes it easy and efficient for inmates to move around, but the design is monotonous and full of visually unappealing materials, like steel and concrete. Plus, tight quarters inside these spaces can foster conflict. Halden has a different structure: a campus design, where inmates move from one building to another, and are surrounded by lots of windows and construction materials that help muffle noise and take advantage of natural light. The prison’s layout also encourages guards to interact with inmates face-to-face, which fosters better relationships and reduces security-related incidents. Halden’s design style is expensive - which is why we mostly see it implemented in places with good social support systems, like Western Europe and Scandinavia. Still, the design is setting new standards for what prisons could be like in the future. By Design is a new Vox video series about the intersection of design and technology, hosted by Christophe Haubursin. Check out all the By Design episodes here: usa-video.net/NUMa0QkPzns-video.html Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: Norway is designing a more humane prison Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How Leonardo da Vinci made a "satellite" map in 1502
How Leonardo da Vinci made a "satellite" map in 1502
5 months ago
It was a feat of technological and symbolic imagination. And it was pretty accurate, too. Join the Video Lab to see Phil's Q&A! bit.ly/video-lab Leonardo da Vinci’s known for his art and inventions - but also his groundbreaking maps, like this one of Imola, Italy. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores how it was made. Further reading: 1) John Pinto’s History of the Ichnographic City Plan is useful to understand the history of these maps. 2) Check out Portraying the City in Early Modern Europe: Measurement, Representation, and Planning by Hilary Ballon and David Friedman for more info. 3) If you want to dig deeper into early maps, Jessica Maier’s Mapping Past and Present: Leonardo Bufalini’s Plan of Rome is fascinating. Please email Phil if you have trouble finding any of these papers. Drafting 1502’s equivalent to a “satellite” map was a massive undertaking, and Leonardo managed to pull it off. His early map helped Italian politcian Cesare Borgia construct an idea of the town of Imola that was far more accurate than most contemporary maps. Through the use of careful measurements of angles and pacing out distances using a primitive odometer, Leonardo managed to create a map that was very close to accurate. This map - an “ichnographic” map - was a step forward in portraying how maps could work to represent geography. Though it’s marked with some inaccuracies, it’s stunningly precise for the time and pushed forward the art of mapmaking. Leonardo’s Imola remains, even today, a remarkably useful guide to the city. In Vox Almanac, Senior Producer Phil Edwards explains the world through history's footnotes. Watch all of Vox Almanac here: usa-video.net/4dgzJQsAXfI-video.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why this black hole photo is such a big deal
Why this black hole photo is such a big deal
5 months ago
What it took to collect these 54-million-year-old photons from a supermassive black hole. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab This is an updated version of a video we published in 2016 about the Event Horizon Telescope, an international collaboration to image a black hole for the first time in human history. On April 10, 2019, the team announced their results: They had successfully imaged the supermassive black hole in the center of the galaxy m87, which is nearly 54 million light-years away from us. They were able to achieve unprecedented resolution using very long baseline interferometry, which combines the observations of multiple radio telescopes across the globe. The team wanted to find out whether Einstein's Theory of General Relativity holds up in the extreme environment of black holes, and the results do, in fact, seem to be consistent with the predictions. In the future, we may see more and shaper images of black holes as the team targets smaller wavelengths of light and recruits more telescopes. Eventually, they may include an orbiting space telescope. Vox Observatory takes a magnifying glass to some of life's most interesting questions with a focus on science and technology. Watch other Vox Observatory videos here: usa-video.net/pAoEHR4aW8I-video.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
How heavy metal and Satan gave us this sticker
How heavy metal and Satan gave us this sticker
5 months ago
Heavy metal and Satan played a role in the introduction of the explicit lyrics sticker. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The explicit lyrics sticker is one of the most recognizable images in American music. Its placement on an album cover signifies you’re going to hear something for adult ears only, and it’s an image we often take for granted. The story behind how we got that sticker is bonkers, to say the least. The very public discussion around the advisory label involved the Parents Music Resource Center (PMRC), a group led by the wives of Washington politicians and a few musicians including Frank Zappa, Dee Snider, and John Denver. While the PMRC’s involvement was allegedly sparked by some raunchy lyrics from Prince’s 1984 album Purple Rain, the debate over rock lyrics had been infiltrating American culture and politics for a decade. The driving force behind that debate was the rise of heavy metal, a genre that saw explosive popularity with the launch of MTV in 1981, and the growing influence of the religious right, who saw rock music as a powerful threat to Christianity. Follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: facebook.com/VoxEarworm And be sure to check out Earworm's complete first season here: bit.ly/2QCwhMH Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. A number of sources went into the research of this piece including Eric Nuzum’s book Parental Advisory: Music Censorship in America www.amazon.com/dp/B002SR2QFK/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: The devilish history of the explicit lyrics sticker Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Cereal makers sold us a breakfast myth
Cereal makers sold us a breakfast myth
5 months ago
Is breakfast the most important meal of the day? Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Cereal companies have perpetuated a big myth about breakfast: that the first meal of the day is crucial to good health. And one of their most long-lasting claims is that breakfast is a good strategy for weight loss. Turns out, a closer look at the science suggests that may not be the case. We trace the origins of this myth, and the long history of breakfast companies making dubious health claims. Check out Julia Belluz’s Vox article that this video is based on here: www.vox.com/2019/2/1/18206873/breakfast-diet-weight-loss And for a deeper look at some of the studies we mention in the piece, you can find them here: www.bmj.com/content/bmj/364/bmj.l42.full.pdf faculty.seattlecentral.edu/jwhorley/Breakfast_BMI.pdf www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4473164/ Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: Is breakfast the most important meal of the day? Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Earworm is back with Season 2
Earworm is back with Season 2
5 months ago
Earworm is back with Season 2. Watch the first episode here: usa-video.net/v9gLmBgUTV4-video.html Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Vox’s Earworm, a video series that dives deep into the origin stories of sounds in pop music, is back for a second season. We’ll be telling stories that cover everything from the 1980s backlash against heavy metal to the otherworldly sounds of Jamaican dub music. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why Tucker Carlson pretends to hate elites
Why Tucker Carlson pretends to hate elites
5 months ago
Why would Tucker Carlson, who used to brag about being an “out-of-the-closet elitist,” use his primetime Fox News show to rail against the “ruling class?” Become a member of the Vox Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Tucker Carlson has branded himself as a populist, condemning the “liberal elite” that he argues makes up the American “ruling class.” It’s a good shtick, and it’s helped him stand out from other Fox News hosts. But while Tucker decries the “elite” on his show, he regularly ignores major stories of Republican economic policies that harm the working class, choosing instead to focus on bogus culture war stories. That isn’t an accident. Carlson’s show is meant to distract Fox News viewers from Republican economics, channeling their frustration and anger at groups that don’t deserve it. That kind of misdirection produces what Marxist theorists call “false consciousness”: when workers are tricked into accepting their own exploitation. On Strikethrough, Vox producer Carlos Maza explores the challenges facing the news media in the age of Trump. Follow Carlos on Facebook for more: facebook.com/CarlosMazaVox Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How this family built life hack culture
How this family built life hack culture
5 months ago
They inspired “Cheaper by the Dozen.” But their story is far more interesting than a movie. Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab This famous family was fascinating, unique, and contributed to the way we live today. In this pilot episode of History Club, Vox’s Phil Edwards and Coleman Lowndes discuss the incredible Gilbreth story, with all its twists and turns. The Gilbreth family became famous in the film "Cheaper By The Dozen" but they were far more interesting than the most recent incarnation. Though the 1950 movie came closer to the truth, the real Gilbreths were pioneers in home life and the business world. Frank and Lillian Gilbreth were equal partners in their unique business of time efficiency. Frank Gilbreth brought a construction background, while Lillian was the psychological half. Together, their time and motion studies mixed analysis and psychology in a seamless fashion. Later on, Lillian led their business alone - and her pivot to home life has a clear connection to the life hack culture we live in today. Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: How this woman built life hack culture Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How scientists solved this dinosaur puzzle
How scientists solved this dinosaur puzzle
5 months ago
We’ve never found a fully intact T. Rex, but we know how to build one. This video is presented by Wix: www.wix.com/go/vox Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab When paleontologists uncover a dinosaur they usually only find part of the animal, but when we walk through a museum we see exhibits that paint a full picture - so how do they fill in all those blank spaces? In the early 1900’s artists used to hand carve the pieces, but we’ve come a long way in the past century - both technologically and scientifically. Now, we’re living in what some call a “golden age” for paleontology. Researchers are uncovering nearly one new species of dinosaur a week - making building exhibits easier and more efficient. Norell’s newest exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History called T.Rex: The ultimate predator is open through August 9th 2020: www.amnh.org/exhibitions/t-rex-the-ultimate-predator If you want to learn more about the Brontosaurus mishap and revival you can read the study here: peerj.com/articles/857/ Throughout the research, I also found this really awesome interactive graphic that show where and when various fossils were found: paleobiodb.org/navigator/ Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: How to build a dinosaur Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why baby cages were a thing
Why baby cages were a thing
5 months ago
Yep, they hung above traffic. And there was a reason. Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores the bold and beautiful baby cage. Yes, hanging baby cages were a minor fad in the early 20th century. Why? A couple of reasons are listed in one baby cage patent, and they give us insight into the culture of the time. First, urbanization in the United States and England made people want to recapture some of the country life they were missing. Baby cages were one way to do that, giving babies “fresh air” without taking them out of the city. As importantly, tuberculosis treatments involving fresh air made it a common treatment for a wider variety of ailments. People sought ways to sleep outdoors as much as possible so, when it came to babies, it makes sense that they wanted the best for their little tykes. So are baby cages a good idea? Probably not - but they are an understandable one. In Vox Almanac, Senior Producer Phil Edwards explains the world through history's footnotes. Watch all of Vox Almanac here: usa-video.net/4dgzJQsAXfI-video.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why some Asian accents swap Ls and Rs in English
Why some Asian accents swap Ls and Rs in English
5 months ago
A linguistic stereotype, explained. This video is presented by Brilliant: brilliant.org/Vox/ Thank you the Video Lab members (Janet, Martian, and Mariko) who helped me with this video. To learn more about the Video Lab and sign up, visit bit.ly/video-lab Check out Yuta’s USa-video channel here: usa-video.net/u/YPlusShow And browse Dr. Lawson’s ultrasound examples here: www.seeingspeech.ac.uk/r-and-l-in-english/ A foreign accent is when someone speaks a second language with the rules of their first language, and one of the most persistent and well-studied foreign-accent features is a lack of L/R contrast among native Japanese speakers learning English. It’s so well-known that American soldiers in World War II reportedly used codewords like “lallapalooza” to distinguish Japanese spies from Chinese allies. But American movies and TV shows have applied this linguistic stereotype to Korean and Chinese characters too, like Kim Jong Il in Team America: World Police, or Chinese restaurant employees singing “fa ra ra ra ra” in A Christmas Story. However, Japanese, Korean, and Chinese are completely different languages that each handle L-sound and R-sounds differently. In this episode of Vox Observatory, we take a look at each language and how it affects pronunciation for English-language learners. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How the British failed India and Pakistan
How the British failed India and Pakistan
5 months ago
The two nations were born at war - which can be traced back to this British strategy. Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab For nearly 200 years, India was ruled by the British. The large nation was home to three dominant religious groups - Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs. In order to discourage unified Indian campaigns for independence, the British reinforced divisions along religious lines. By 1947, the British were finally ready to turn India over to Indian rule. But the seeds of discontent had been sowed. And the handover of power would be more bloody than anyone could have imagined. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The conflict in Kashmir, explained
The conflict in Kashmir, explained
5 months ago
Why Kashmir remains one of the most militarized regions in the world. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The dispute between India and Pakistan over Kashmir is one of the longest running conflicts. Ever since Britain left India in 1947 and hastily drew borders demarcating a Hindu-majority India and a Muslim-majority Pakistan, Kashmir, located right between the two, has been fervently claimed by both nations. India and Pakistan’s first war was fought over Kashmir’s status as the the newly independent countries were being formed. After over a year of bloody conflict the UN stepped in and brokered a ceasefire that drew a line down the middle of Kashmir and gave a portion of the territory to India and the remainder to Pakistan. This arrangement was meant to be temporary. Once the violence settled a vote was to be held that would allow Kashmiris to decide their own future. But more than 70 years later, Kashmiris have yet to vote on their status. They remain stuck between two nuclear nations locked in a dangerous conflict with no end in sight. Additional reading and sources on the conflict: [BBC Timeline] www.bbc.com/news/world-south-asia-16069078 [UN report - Human Rights in Kashmir] www.ohchr.org/Documents/Countries/IN/DevelopmentsInKashmirJune2016ToApril2018.pdf [CFR Conflict Tracker] www.cfr.org/interactive/global-conflict-tracker/conflict/conflict-between-india-and-pakistan [Freedom House Report] freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2018/indian-kashmir Special thanks to Kashmiris who shared their opinions with us: Aqib Salam Aarif Shah Aijaz Ganaie Injilla Sidiq Sadaf Zehra Mian Tufail Mehak Dhaar Rehan Rihana Maqbool Waqas Khan Sajid Yousuf Tariq Bashir Through Vox Atlas, producer Sam Ellis demonstrates where conflicts occur on a map and the ways in which foreign policy shapes a region. Watch all the episodes here: bit.ly/2SThVsf Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why a cat always lands on its feet
Why a cat always lands on its feet
6 months ago
In 1894, a French scientist used a camera to solve a physics problem. Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Étienne-Jules Marey was a French scientist and inventor who analyzed how things moved. He developed a way to photograph multiple stages of movement onto a single glass plate, a technique called chronophotography. Later, when Kodak introduced celluloid film, Marey swapped the glass plate for a roll of film that moved in between exposures. This technique formed the basis of cinematography, and it’s how he recorded the stages of a cat righting itself in midair. He published his findings in Nature and demonstrated how the cat splits its body in two and uses the inertia of its own body weight to spin around. Darkroom is a new series from Vox producer Coleman Lowndes that digs into stories of the past, one photograph at a time. Watch all the episodes bit.ly/321DvzO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What Mueller has already revealed about Trump and Russia
What Mueller has already revealed about Trump and Russia
6 months ago
The FBI investigation found three connections between the Trump campaign and Russia. Join the Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab The FBI investigation into whether the Trump campaign's "colluded" with Russia has taken several twists and turns. But we have to remember that FBI special counsel Robert Mueller has already revealed connections between Trump and Russia, through an array of court documents. We can understand the Trump-Russia ties through three categories, and see the many lines that connect the people who work for Trump and Russia. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The golf ball that made golfers too good
The golf ball that made golfers too good
6 months ago
Golf's distance debate, explained. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab These days, pro golfers are hitting the ball far. Really far. And it's creating a problem: because modern golfers can reach the hole with fewer shots than before, older courses -- like Augusta National Golf Club, Oakmont Country Club, and others -- are becoming obsolete. Now, professional organizations, like the United States Golf Association, are struggling to find a solution for big powerful golfers like Dustin Johnson, Bubba Watson, and Tiger Woods. While the jump in distance is due to lots of factors, conversation is centering on the controversial possibility of redesigning the golf ball to reduce distance. It'd be the latest turn in the ball's long history: Golf balls have evolved from "featheries," to gutties, to balata balls, and eventually dimpled modern balls. But the biggest, and most recent change? The almost-instantaneous switch from wound balls to solid core multilayer balls like the Titleist Pro V1. A previous version of this video contained an audio glitch at 2:35. The error has been corrected. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
Why you're recycling wrong
Why you're recycling wrong
6 months ago
Knowing what you can and can’t recycle isn’t easy. But when you put stuff that can’t be recycled into that blue bin, it can turn entire hauls of otherwise recyclable materials into trash. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab People try to recycle everything. Waste management workers routinely find bowling balls, batteries, Christmas lights, animal carcasses, even dirty diapers. In 2018, about 25% of items that Americans tried to recycle were actually non-recyclable trash, known as "contamination." The more contamination that enters recycling plants, the more likely a waste management company will simply send the entire haul, including items that could be recycled, to a landfill. Watch the video above to learn more about why Americans’ recycling habits are trash, and how you can prevent recycling contamination. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why you still don't understand the Green New Deal
Why you still don't understand the Green New Deal
6 months ago
Political news coverage tends to focus on strategy over substance, and that’s making it less likely that the public will agree on big policy ideas when we need them the most. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO The Green New Deal is an ambitious proposal that outlines how the U.S. might begin transitioning towards a green economy over the next ten years. It includes steps like upgrading our power grid and renovating our transportation infrastructure. But most people watching news coverage likely don’t know what’s in the Green New Deal. And that’s because political news coverage tends to focus on strategy over substance, fixating on a bill’s political ramifications rather than its ability to solve a problem. That approach to news coverage is known as “tactical framing,” and research shows it makes audiences at home more cynical and less informed about big policy debates. The result is a cycle of partisanship, where solutions to big problems like climate change are judged on their political popularity rather than their merit. Check out this in-depth look at the substance of the Green New Deal: www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2018/12/21/18144138/green-new-deal-alexandria-ocasio-cortez Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. On Strikethrough, Vox producer Carlos Maza explores the challenges facing the news media in the age of Trump. Follow Carlos on Facebook for more: facebook.com/CarlosMazaVox Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why Republicans failed to fit taxes onto a postcard
Why Republicans failed to fit taxes onto a postcard
6 months ago
For years, Republicans have proposed making the tax code so simple that Americans could file their taxes on a single postcard. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO So when they got the chance to reform taxes in 2017, they made sure to design and implement a postcard-sized tax return. In reality, the postcard isn’t what they say it is. While it’s half the size of the old form, the new form is more condensed than simplified. Important deductions and tax credits, still exist, but they’ve been moved onto other forms. In order to file taxes with the new form, you could end up attaching six or more extra pieces of paper. Republicans didn’t really simplify the tax code, but they still tried to simplify the tax return form. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The design tricks that keep skyscrapers from swaying
The design tricks that keep skyscrapers from swaying
6 months ago
How to keep tall buildings from blowing over. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Skyscrapers are getting skinnier: As cities get denser, architects are designing builders that are taller and taller on smaller and smaller lots. And that poses one big problem: How do you keep them from swaying in the wind? Behind some of the most iconic shapes on our skylines is a secret design language of architectural tricks -twists, holes, and setbacks- that keep buildings still. By Design is a new Vox video series about the intersection of design and technology, hosted by Christophe Haubursin. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
A better way to tax the rich
A better way to tax the rich
6 months ago
American wealth inequality is staggering. A wealth tax, which would hone in on the money people actually have, rather than just the money we earn and spend, could be a solution. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab An astounding amount of American wealth lies with very few ultrarich people. But it isn’t taxed by the federal government. That's because most of the taxes we pay only happen when money changes hands - when we earn it or spend it. This is what a recent proposal from Senator Elizabeth Warren tries to fix. Her plan is to tax fortunes greater than $50 million at 2 percent each year, and wealth greater than $1 billion at 3 percent. When you add it all up, those tiny slivers of massive fortunes would raise enough revenue to pay for huge programs for everyone else. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why parrots can talk like humans
Why parrots can talk like humans
6 months ago
Monkeys are our closest biological relatives, and they can't speak. But parrots don’t seem to have a problem at all. This video is presented by Wix: www.wix.com/go/vox Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab In 2016 researchers released a study with an incredible headline: monkey vocal tracts are speech-ready. It showed that monkeys are held back from speech not by their bodies, but by their brains. But if that’s the case, what’s the deal with birds? Parrots are known for their ability to mimic human speech with incredible accuracy. It’s jarring to hear an animal so vastly different from us speaking our language. So how do they do it? Partially, neurology: parrots are wired for communication in ways other animals (including other birds) are not. But it’s largely physiology. Birds are uniquely equipped to make sounds, and this video will give you a basic overview of how that works. Throughout reporting this piece I had several conversations with Dr. Irene Pepperberg - If you’re interested in the neurology of these birds, I highly recommend checking out her studies on African Grey parrots. I’ve linked to a few of them below: Evidence for Conceptual Quantitative Abilities in the African Grey Parrot: Labeling of Cardinal Sets Acquisition of the same/different concept by an African Grey parrot: Learning with respect to categories of color, shape, and material Number Comprehension by a Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus), Including a Zero-Like Concept Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How the Hindenburg killed an entire industry
How the Hindenburg killed an entire industry
6 months ago
A routine press photo-op in 1937 ended up recording the explosion of the greatest airship ever built. Become a member of the Vox Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Special thanks to David Fowler, who generously allowed us to use his drawing of the plan of the Hindenburg (00:13 of the video). See more of his work here: www.highriskadventures.com/airships/ In May 1937, the airship Hindenburg burned up while approaching Lakehurst, New Jersey, on its first flight to the US that year. A flying symbol of pride for Nazi Germany, the Hindenburg was the biggest and most elaborate zeppelin ever built. At a time when airplanes were only carrying one or two people across the Atlantic Ocean, the Hindenburg was flying paid passengers, who enjoyed its dining room, reading room, passenger lounge, and even smoking room. It was an iconic luxury vessel, but it was filled with hydrogen, a flammable gas. And when it rushed its landing in New Jersey, it ended up exploding in front of a waiting group of newsreel cameras and becoming the first aviation disaster filmed as it was taking place. Sam Shere’s photo of the moment just before the ship was entirely engulfed is now an iconic snapshot that manages to perfectly frame the entire disaster. Darkroom is a new series from Vox producer Coleman Lowndes that digs into stories of the past, one photograph at a time. Watch all the episodes bit.ly/321DvzO Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: The first disaster caught on film Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why a US city is searching for mass graves
Why a US city is searching for mass graves
6 months ago
White mobs destroyed "Black Wall Street." But where are the victims' bodies? Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Nearly 100 years ago, a white mob destroyed an American neighborhood called “Black Wall Street,” murdering an estimated 300 people in Tulsa, Oklahoma. That incident - known as the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre - has been largely left out of US history books. Today, a century later, the city still has a lot of questions. For one, where are the bodies of the victims? As the city's mayor re-opens the search for mass graves, we take a look at what happened back in 1921…and why finding these graves still matters to the people of Tulsa. For more reading, check out the links below: Vox’s reporting on an eyewitness account of the horrific attack: www.vox.com/2016/6/1/11827994/tulsa-race-massacre-black-wall-street The Washington Post’s in-depth story on the massacre and the current challenges of gentrification: www.washingtonpost.com/news/local/wp/2018/09/28/feature/they-was-killing-black-people/ And to take a look through more digitized photos, audio, and documents from 1921, check out the Tulsa Historical Society’s collection: www.tulsahistory.org/exhibit/1921-tulsa-race-massacre/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Peek inside the Vox Video Lab
Peek inside the Vox Video Lab
6 months ago
This video extra is part of the Video Lab. Become a member here: bit.ly/video-lab Vox producer Christophe Haubursin gives you a taste of what goes on in Video Lab, our USa-video membership program. Each month, someone from the video team breaks down our favorite videos on the internet, so you don’t have to spend time searching for the good stuff. Joining the Video Lab helps us make more our channel even more ambitious. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab Recommended Video URLs: First Man (2018) - scene comparisons bit.ly/2SsfNGX Reddit Place (/r/place) - FULL 72h (90fps) TIMELAPSE bit.ly/2TdetMP Meet a bug whisperer and his traveling insect zoo: bit.ly/2tGqj3I In a nutshell bit.ly/2GR9NXh What makes Star Wars STAR WARS? bit.ly/2GMY241 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
Why these plankton are eating plastic
Why these plankton are eating plastic
6 months ago
Microfibers, used to make things like yoga pants, are the ocean’s tiniest problem. This video is presented by Brilliant: brilliant.org/vox Correction: At 1:04, we mistakenly suggested that rayon is made from plastic. In fact, it is derived from cellulose. To go deeper on this topic, make sure to read Vox science reporter Brian Resnick’s article on Vox.com: www.vox.com/the-goods/2018/9/19/17800654/clothes-plastic-pollution-polyester-washing-machine Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0111913 www.nature.com/articles/s41561-018-0080-1 www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X16307639 journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0111913 www.nature.com/articles/srep14340#f3 www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749116311666#undfig1 www.nature.com/articles/srep33997 science.sciencemag.org/content/345/6193/144 When you think of marine pollution, you might picture an oil-slicked seal struggling to breathe on a blackened beach, or a turtle looping in circles with the plastic collar of a six-pack wrapped around its neck. In the past, those powerful images have generated interest and resources for fighting marine pollution, but now a new, much tinier threat is emerging. Microplastics - meaning any plastic object smaller than five millimeters - constitute the vast majority of plastic particles polluting marine habitats. Of those microplastics, a large share are microfibers: tiny strands of plastic that are woven into fabric used to make clothing. These fabrics, known by names like polyester and nylon, are cheap to produce, comfortable to wear, and since arriving on the market in the late 1940s, companies have been using more and more of them. Every time we do laundry, a small amount of microfibers are separated from clothes made from these materials. Since those pieces of plastic are extremely small, they're able to make their way through water treatment centers and into marine resources. Once they reach marine habitats, the ocean’s tiniest creatures consume them, and microfibers work their way up the food chain. Eventually, they reach us. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
Why cartoon characters curse like this
Why cartoon characters curse like this
6 months ago
How these @*#%!$ things became a symbol for cursing. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab Check out Language Log for more stuff like this: languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/ In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores the big @!#*$ deal with using symbols for curses. Known as the “grawlix” - a term invented by Beetle Bailey cartoonist Mort Walker - this string of symbols is almost as old as comics, extending back to the early 1900s. Comics like The Katzenjammer Kids and Lady Bountiful were truly inventing the art form and, in the process, had to figure out a way to show obscenities to kids. Enter #*@!$ like this. The grawlix performs a censorship function while, at the same time, revealing that something naughty is going on. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Here's where Borders is going next
Here's where Borders is going next
6 months ago
Tell me what stories I should do in India: www.vox.com/borders-india Follow Johnny on Instagram instagram.com/johnnywharris Follow Vox Borders on Facebook Watch: facebook.com/VoxBorders/ Original Music by Tom Fox: usa-video.net/c/UCUIM14Vyndaq8MuDeW7BsIg Vox Borders is an international documentary series by Emmy-nominated producer Johnny Harris exploring life at the edge of nations. For more, visit vox.com/borders. Start from the beginning. Watch all full episodes of Vox Borders on USa-video in one playlist: usa-video.net/LY_Yiu2U2Ts-video.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
Why safe playgrounds aren't great for kids
Why safe playgrounds aren't great for kids
6 months ago
There's a case for making playgrounds riskier. This video is presented by Wix, sign up at www.wix.com/go/vox Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO The stereotypical modern playground - with its bright colors and rubberized flooring - is designed to be clean, safe, and lawsuit-proof. But that isn't necessarily the best design for kids. US playground designers spent decades figuring out how to minimize risk: reducing heights, softening surfaces, and limiting loose parts. But now, some are experimenting with creating risk. A growing body of research has found that risky outdoor play is a key part of children’s health, promoting social interactions, creativity, problem-solving, and resilience. Some communities are even experimenting with “adventure playgrounds,” a format with origins in World War II Denmark, where bomb sites became impromptu playgrounds. Filled with props like nails, hammers, saws, paint, tires, and wood planks, these spaces look more like junkyards than play spaces - and parents are often kept outside of the playground while children are chaperoned by staff. Now, that question of keeping children safe versus keeping children engaged is at the heart of a big debate in playground design. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
American segregation, mapped at day and night
American segregation, mapped at day and night
7 months ago
We work in diverse places. We live in segregated ones. Check out this interactive map that Alvin built, to see these effects for yourself: www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/2/18/18217346/work-home-segregation-map Correction: At 3:37, we mislabeled a map "Charlotte," but it is actually the Charleston metropolitan area. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO America policies engineered our segregated homes. But the workplace? That had the chance of being a place where we interact with people of other races - and form meaningful relationships. These maps show that this hasn't exactly happened. In fact, the most personal parts of our lives is still very segregated. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Who actually pays for your credit card rewards?
Who actually pays for your credit card rewards?
7 months ago
Here’s why you’re paying for credit card rewards - even if you use cash. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab Shoppers love credit card rewards. Banks promise offers of cash back, bonus miles, and cash bonuses to get you to sign up and spend. In 2018, 92% of all credit card spending was made on a rewards card. Some people, like Brian Kelly, a.k.a "The Points Guy," have even made a career our of maximizing these rewards. But who ends up actually paying for all these rewards? (Hint: it’s probably you.) Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Fox News keeps forcing Trump into shutdowns
Fox News keeps forcing Trump into shutdowns
7 months ago
Government shutdowns are disasters for Republicans, but right-wing media makes it almost impossible for the GOP to compromise in a budget fight. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO The U.S. government has experienced three major shutdowns over the past twenty-five years. In 1995, it was a fight over programs like Medicare. In 2013, it was over an effort to defund Obamacare. In 2018, it was over funding for a border wall. And while each crisis revolved around a different policy fight, they all followed a similar pattern: Republicans, egged on by right-wing pundits and talk radio, were pressured into forcing a government shutdown that eventually blew up in their faces. Ever since the 90s, Republicans have become dependent on right-wing outlets like Fox News and Rush Limbaugh to rally and mobilize their supporters. That’s garnered them success in major elections, but it’s also backed them into a corner. Republicans know they can’t betray the conservative pundits who helped elect them, but those pundits are becoming more and more ideologically extreme, pressuring Republicans to shut the government down over even minor funding disputes. As long as right-wing media has a stranglehold on conservative politics, Republicans will keep finding themselves steered into crises they know they can’t win. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
False Positive: When forensic science fails [Full version]
False Positive: When forensic science fails [Full version]
7 months ago
How “science” and “justice” failed Robert Lee Stinson. Join the video lab to support more ambitious projects like this one: www.vox.com/join False Positive is a documentary produced by Vox Senior Producer Joss Fong about the conviction of Robert Lee Stinson. Stinson spent 23 years in a Wisconsin prison for murder after two forensic odontologists concluded that his teeth matched bite marks found on the body of the victim. False Positive looks at the structural and cultural factors that have made the U.S. criminal justice system susceptible to unreliable forensic science, and that continue to impede progress toward more reliable methods today. This documentary was originally released as three separate episodes: Part 1: usa-video.net/kiw1Zv-B02c-video.html Part 2: usa-video.net/beixsgKr93o-video.html Part 3: usa-video.net/-1y8Nq0ndsk-video.html To go even deeper into the series, become a member of the Vox Video Lab, for exclusive access to a live Q&A about this story, and additional behind-the-scenes details on the series. Watch the Q&A with Joss and Johnny Harris: usa-video.net/juBYSt_hB9I-video.html And the Lab extra here: usa-video.net/aFZ8sCnR1So-video.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
The 70% top tax rate, explained with potatoes
The 70% top tax rate, explained with potatoes
7 months ago
Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez called for a 70 percent top tax rate on the super rich. Start by watching our explainer on the marginal tax rate: usa-video.net/VJhsjUPDulw-video.html While it might seem like a radical idea, it's actually based on an economic theory that tries to make everyone as well-off as possible. How can we make all citizens as well-off as possible? That's the simple question behind something call "optimal tax theory." It starts from this idea that, to a rich person, one dollar is worth almost nothing. Take away the dollar and he'll be just as well off as he was before. But that dollar is worth a lot to poor people. So, if the government wants to optimize the well-being of its citizens, it should tax that money from the rich and give it to the poor. But at a certain point, we can't keep taxing the rich more. To find out why, watch this video. www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/1/4/18168431/alexandria-ocasio-cortez-70-percent www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/1/7/18171927/alexandria-ocasio-cortez-60-minutes-trump-racist Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Become a member of the Vox Video Lab! bit.ly/video-lab Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
America's cocaine habit fueled its migrant crisis
America's cocaine habit fueled its migrant crisis
7 months ago
And it's destroying Guatemala and Honduras. Help us make more ambitious series like Vox Atlas by joining the Vox Video Lab. It brings you closer to our work and gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with your favorite Vox creators. Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab Today, the US is facing a migration crisis on its southern border with Mexico. Thousands of people from Central America, especially Guatemala and Honduras, are fleeing their home countries, taking a dangerous journey north through Mexico, and claiming asylum in the US. How did this crisis begin? Much of it can be traced back to the 1970s cocaine trade. Cocaine, which is mostly produced in Colombia, used to be shipped by boat and plane across the Caribbean. But in the 80s and 90s, the US cracked down on this route, so traffickers started shipping their drugs through Central America and over land to Mexico. That created a violent and competitive turf war between gangs and organizations in Guatemala and Honduras, and after the governments cracked down, violence only increased, forcing people to flee, often to the US. Through Vox Atlas, producer Sam Ellis demonstrates where conflicts occur on a map and the ways in which foreign policy shapes a region. Watch all the episodes here: bit.ly/2SThVsf Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
A murder solved, 23 years later | Part 3
A murder solved, 23 years later | Part 3
7 months ago
Watch Part 1: usa-video.net/kiw1Zv-B02c-video.html And Part 2: usa-video.net/beixsgKr93o-video.html Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO To learn more about this topic: The Cadaver King and the County Dentist by Radley Balko and Tucker Carrington: www.amazon.com/Cadaver-King-Country-Dentist-Injustice-ebook/dp/B01NCHP7XH/ref=sr_1_1 Cops in Lab Coats by Sandra Guerra Thompson: www.amazon.com/Cops-Lab-Coats-Convictions-Laboratories/dp/1611635292/ref=sr_1_1 The 2009 NAS report "Strengthening Forensic Science": www.nap.edu/catalog/12589/strengthening-forensic-science-in-the-united-states-a-path-forward The 2016 Obama administration report: obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/PCAST/pcast_forensic_science_report_final.pdf "The Shifted Paradigm: Forensic Sciences's Overdue Evolution from Magic to Law": papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2572480 False Positive is a 30-minute documentary, split into three episodes and produced by Vox Senior Producer Joss Fong, focusing on the conviction of Robert Lee Stinson. Stinson spent 23 years in a Wisconsin prison for murder after two forensic odontologists concluded that his teeth matched bite marks found on the body of the victim. False Positive looks at the structural and cultural factors that have made the U.S. criminal justice system susceptible to unreliable forensic science, and that continue to impede progress toward more reliable methods today. Watch all three parts of this mini-series: Part 1: usa-video.net/kiw1Zv-B02c-video.html Part 2: usa-video.net/beixsgKr93o-video.html Part 3: usa-video.net/-1y8Nq0ndsk-video.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The deadly race to the South Pole
The deadly race to the South Pole
7 months ago
Two exploration teams raced to the South Pole. Only one made it out alive. Correction: A previous version of this video used an outdated British flag. The error has been corrected. We also occasionally referred to the British team as English. In fact, some members of Scott's team were Scottish and Welsh. Help us make our channel more ambitious by joining the Vox Video Lab. Becoming a member brings you closer to our work and gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with your favorite Vox creators. Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Robert Falcon Scott was a British explorer who dreamed of being the first person to reach the South Pole. In 1912, he reached the Pole only to learn that his Norwegian rival, Roald Amundsen, had beat him to it. Caught by freakish weather and a string of bad luck, his entire party died trying to get back. Reasons for his failure range from his use of ponies rather than dogs to a highly unusual temperature drop that made the journey back impossible to survive. Darkroom is a new series from Vox producer Coleman Lowndes that digs into stories of the past, one photograph at a time. Watch all the episodes here: bit.ly/321DvzO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The DeLorean paradox: how it failed and became a legend
The DeLorean paradox: how it failed and became a legend
7 months ago
The DeLorean was supposed to be the car of the future. Then they stopped making it. Help us make our channel more ambitious by joining the Vox Video Lab. Becoming a member brings you closer to our work and gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with your favorite Vox creators. Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO In this episode of Vox Almanac, producer Phil Edwards explores the past and present of the DeLorean Motor Company, which made the infamous DMC-12. Though many today know the car through the movie Back to the Future, DeLorean has its own incredible story to tell (and one that’s almost harder to believe than a story about time travel). John Z. DeLorean is at its center as the founder and namesake of the company. His path through the upper echelon of General Motors seemed to have set him on course for that company’s Presidency - but he dreamed of starting his own company. The result was the DeLorean Motor Company, which was established in America and eventually planted a factory in Dunmurry, Ireland, near Belfast and during the sectarian civil war known as “the Troubles.” For this video, we interviewed Barrie Wills about his experience working at the company - but we also talked to DeLorean owners about the ways the car has endured, thanks to the movie Back to the Future, and, more importantly, their own ingenuity and creativity. A DeLorean community has kept the car going and, despite the fact that production ended in the early '80s, the car continues to inspire new fans even today. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How junk science convicted an innocent man | Part 2
How junk science convicted an innocent man | Part 2
7 months ago
Watch the next part of False Positive: usa-video.net/-1y8Nq0ndsk-video.html Robert Lee Stinson's trial shows how the judicial system lacks an effective filter to catch bad science before it's used to convict innocent people. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO False Positive is a 30-minute documentary, split into three parts, focusing on the conviction of Robert Lee Stinson. Stinson was wrongly convicted of murder on the basis of forensic bite mark evidence. Through his arrest, trial, and exoneration, Vox producer Joss Fong explains the structural flaws that make the US criminal justice system vulnerable to bad science. Watch all three parts of this mini-series: Part 1: usa-video.net/kiw1Zv-B02c-video.html Part 2: usa-video.net/beixsgKr93o-video.html Part 3: usa-video.net/-1y8Nq0ndsk-video.html To go even deeper into the series, become a member of the Vox Video Lab, for exclusive access to a live Q&A following the final episode, and additional behind-the-scenes details on the series. www.vox.com/join Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
El Chapo's drug tunnels, explained
El Chapo's drug tunnels, explained
7 months ago
How El Chapo dug his way to the top of the drug trade. Help us make our channel more ambitious by joining the Vox Video Lab. Becoming a member brings you closer to our work and gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with your favorite Vox creators. Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab Check out the Today, Explained podcast episode on El Chapo here: bit.ly/2DaFZS8 Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Throughout his career as a drug trafficker, tunnels have been the common theme in El Chapo’s story. When he gained control of a major drug trafficking corridor in the late 1980s, Joaquin Guzman Loera - then known as “el Rapido”- was the first to create super tunnels for transporting drugs across the border. At the time, a crackdown by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) meant Colombian cocaine was in decline and the Mexican narcotrafficker saw an opportunity. By using tunnels to facilitate fast transport, El Chapo leveraged his role as a trafficker to claim new responsibilities as a cultivator and distributor of drugs. Over the next twenty years, he learned how to use his drug tunnels in ways nobody had ever imagined and his success became dependent on his subterranean inclinations. Although his masterful use of tunnels led him to a maximum security jail cell at Altiplano prison, it would be tunnels that also led him back out again. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What Angela Merkel's exit means for Germany - and Europe
What Angela Merkel's exit means for Germany — and Europe
7 months ago
The European Union is about to lose one of its last anti-populist voices. This video is presented by CuriosityStream: www.curiositystream.com/Vox Help us make our channel more ambitious by joining the Vox Video Lab. Becoming a member brings you closer to our work and gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with your favorite Vox creators. Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO German Chancellor Angela Merkel has been called the most powerful woman in the world, the liberal West's last defender, and the de facto leader of Europe. But 19 years after entering politics, she has announced she won't be running for a fifth term as chancellor and will be stepping away from politics. Her announcement comes at a pivotal time when nationalism is on the rise in Europe and the continent is still reeling from the 2015 migrant crisis. So what does Merkel stepping down mean for the future of Germany - and for the European Union? Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How bite marks made one man a murder suspect | Part 1
How bite marks made one man a murder suspect | Part 1
7 months ago
Watch part 2: usa-video.net/beixsgKr93o-video.html and part 3: usa-video.net/-1y8Nq0ndsk-video.html Help us make more ambitious series like False Positive by joining the Vox Video Lab. It brings you closer to our work and gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with Joss and all the other Vox creators. Learn more at bit.ly/video-lab Produced by Vox senior producer Joss Fong, False Positive is a 30-minute documentary, split into three episodes, focusing on the conviction of Robert Lee Stinson. Stinson spent 23 years in a Wisconsin prison for murder after two forensic odontologists concluded that his teeth matched bite marks found on the body of the victim. False Positive looks at the structural and cultural factors that have made the U.S. criminal justice system susceptible to unreliable forensic science, and that continue to impede progress toward more reliable methods today. We take a look at his trial in part two. Watch here: usa-video.net/beixsgKr93o-video.html And the story concludes in part 3: usa-video.net/-1y8Nq0ndsk-video.html To go even deeper into the series, become a member of the Vox Video Lab, for exclusive access to a live Q&A following the final episode on February 6th, and additional behind-the-scenes details on the series. bit.ly/video-lab - Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: The murder: How one man's teeth made him a suspect Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Zack Stines
Zack Stines - 4 minutes ago
why must news now and days have to be SO SO left or right???? this part of vox news only works because those to the right enjotly watching trump and all of his counterparts be put down, which i think is disgusting. especially when you realise almost all news is either left or right now. this is honestly sad
Bedava Nitro
Bedava Nitro - 5 minutes ago
Türküm turk olanlar +1
Wayne Burkett
Wayne Burkett - 5 minutes ago
BETO the convicted BURGLAR wants to confiscate your home defense, think about that. CRIMINALS want the people they intend to harm to be unarmed !! the COMMIECRATS!!
Plague Doktor
Plague Doktor - 5 minutes ago
Imagine looking to Vox or famous actors for firearms knowledge
Arthur Refslund
Arthur Refslund - 7 minutes ago
LOL! The fact that this was not already required is a joke haha - Especially with the amount of killing going on. Amurica XDDD
Andrew Ling
Andrew Ling - 10 minutes ago
Follow Australia
Caelin Bevan
Caelin Bevan - 12 minutes ago
The problemo: its an anarchy aerver
Jose Carlos Albarracin Sato
Jose Carlos Albarracin Sato - 13 minutes ago
2:15 *Jared from Subway has joined the chat*
Obi9..
Obi9.. - 15 minutes ago
An honest and OBJECTIVE video Vox I am pleasantly surprised
君rei
君rei - 15 minutes ago
Jesus... convicted with no fair trial at the age of 20... all because two professors forcefully connected unproven scientific "evidence", out of what, maybe desperation? What became of those two odontologists, by the way? Hopefully regretting their careers. They were the main factors that propelled this whole debacle of allowing pseudoscience with no reliable error stats into law for two decades. I have an inkling that they probably knew they had nothing to prove themselves right, because you can't be a man of science for so long without acknowledging the stone cold fact of a simple tested theory and statistics.
D.j. B
D.j. B - 17 minutes ago
Taking advantage of crime to Profile & tax a constitutional Right. Licensing a right IS NOT POPULAR! IT IS TYRANNICAL!
Lew James
Lew James - 17 minutes ago
OK, here's a question for all of you philosophers out there. If Poland is democratic, and the clear majority of the people want a "right wing" government, then how is this not a democratic government? The video, like much of what comes from a certain type of media, fails to answer this question. The same problem exists in the middle east. We all want those countries to be "democratic", but what if they vote in genocidal, warmongering governments? Does this mean certain people only want a democracy, so long as the outcome is what they think is "good" government? BTW, at the heart of these questions lies my relief at living, not in a democracy, but in a republic.
Phase Blue
Phase Blue - 19 minutes ago
When violence is at a football game it’s not one organized group, antifa is one organized group which insists violence
Maria Vazquez
Maria Vazquez - 19 minutes ago
Please..see the USa-video channel called..... .....PATIZ TV... ..She has videos of Africa.. Africa looks very pretty and modern!! Please see her videos!!! Thank you!!!
Pan-Wakka
Pan-Wakka - 19 minutes ago
I was always able to detect these kinda images in 1 second. My only skill.
Todd Mintz
Todd Mintz - 22 minutes ago
LIE#7 Gun related deaths have dropped at the exact same rate on a national level during the same time frame, Even in states WITHOUT gun licensing
D.j. B
D.j. B - 23 minutes ago
Just because someone impulsively buys a firearm DOES NOT MEAN THAT THEY WILL HURT ANYONE! WAKE UP!
Peter DeLisle
Peter DeLisle - 24 minutes ago
The gun solution no one is talking about... then explains the exact plan most everyone has been talking about... right...
utpal ghosh
utpal ghosh - 24 minutes ago
Pakistan is a terrorist country...... Birth of terrorism....
Dominic Esquivel
Dominic Esquivel - 26 minutes ago
How come the dangerous one is lighter color
D.j. B
D.j. B - 26 minutes ago
This is why the second amendment states, "Shall not be infringed" so, Stop trying to BRAINWASH PEOPLE INTO THINKING ABOUT FIREARMS NEGATIVELY! ALL WARS ARE WON OR LOST WITH ARMS, SMALL ARMS! We the people are armed to protect ourselves, it is a GOD GIVEN RIGHT WHICH IS WRITTEN INTO THE CONSTITUTION! IF YOU DO NOT LIKE IT THEN, MOVE INTO A TYRANNICAL COUNTRY WHICH PROHIBITS PROTECTION & GUNS!!!! LEAVE THE FUNDIMENTAL RIGHTS IF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE ALONE!!!! Now, they want to propose a tax/ license/ registration which violates the constitution & federal law!!! WAKE UP PEOPLE! STOP BLAMING GUNS & BLAME THE EVIL PEOPLE!
C. L.
C. L. - 26 minutes ago
Barbed wire? Try machine gunning!
Its Me
Its Me - 27 minutes ago
Bomb china already they are taking over asia
Todd Mintz
Todd Mintz - 28 minutes ago
LIE#6 "Create a system to reduce impulse gun purchases" Once you are licensed you can buy a gun, it wouldn't even take the 108 seconds anymore, because once you are licensed you have already completed the background check portion of the gun purchasing process, there would be no reason to get re-licensed
Sannan Saleem
Sannan Saleem - 28 minutes ago
Mohammad ali jinnah was right. Now india is ruled by extremist hindu bjp party, look at how india is ruling over muslim majority kashmir. It would have been on a grand scale in muslim majority Punjab, Sindh, Balochistan, and Khyber-Pakhtunkwa if there was no Pakistan created.
Manas Tiwari
Manas Tiwari - 31 minute ago
Now you're just sounding like them.
Infinity. Drip
Infinity. Drip - 31 minute ago
QWERTY
Todd Mintz
Todd Mintz - 32 minutes ago
LIE#5 "Properly Identify and screen out people that shouldn't own guns" Is exactly what the current background check system does
Todd Mintz
Todd Mintz - 35 minutes ago
LIE#4 Gun Licensing laws have been around for 100 years, They date back to the racist Jim Crow era when Democrats passed laws to restrict blacks from exercising their Constitutional Rights. Gun Licensing laws gave local racist Democrat sheriffs the a power to deny people the Right to own a gun for no legal reason or due process. We have spent 100 years trying to abolish these racist Jim Crow laws and Democrats are still pushing for them
William Roberts
William Roberts - 37 minutes ago
Mickey Rooney's character was just plain terrible.
Buttered Toast
Buttered Toast - 38 minutes ago
USA has too many guns (more guns than people). even if this "helped" it would infringe on other rights which is a bigger evil because it opens the doors for more rights to be stripped away. this is progressives playing innocent
zaq voir
zaq voir - 38 minutes ago
sorry . men go bald in certain ways it's that simple leave it to religion to make "dogma" out of it
Pluto
Pluto - 40 minutes ago
Licensing won't stop bad guys They will buy a gun with no serial number because what type of criminal buys a gun legally And what type of gun owner doesn't practice at a shooting range with their firearm I'm just saying nice idea but it won't work that way....
Y2kSd4
Y2kSd4 - 40 minutes ago
CHINAAA POWELLLL.!!!!
Himalyan monk
Himalyan monk - 41 minute ago
Wrong facts..... Pakistan didnt shoot Indian aircraft.. But india shoot Pakistan
Arno Nym
Arno Nym - 42 minutes ago
americans should be 50 to be able to drink alcohol
ابو عمر الدولاوي
ابو عمر الدولاوي - 42 minutes ago
الدولة الإسلامية باقية بإذن الله وموتوا بغيظكم
Ain Annie Qistina Jamaludin
Ain Annie Qistina Jamaludin - 43 minutes ago
Them:Arguing about celcius and fahrenheit. Kelvin:*sips tea*
Todd Mintz
Todd Mintz - 43 minutes ago
LIE#3. Vox is implying that there is a different and more effective and thorough process during the "Universal Background Check" and the "Background Check" system in place. The term universal just includes private sells....That's it, That's the only difference. The same system that is in place today would be used in the Universal Background Check version......Because it is done by the FBI, and they do not pass you until you have been properly identified and your record has been reviewed, it works
Woo Woo
Woo Woo - 45 minutes ago
Sometimes my ears still move a bit when I hear a sudden sound lol
Amraya Baptiste
Amraya Baptiste - 45 minutes ago
Retroactively? Really DR? That part was mean
Josh B
Josh B - 48 minutes ago
O WOW how Vox isn't totally left leaning...horrible reporting as always
Vincent Tan
Vincent Tan - 48 minutes ago
Things just go down the drain when one wanna do everything according to Quran.
Todd Mintz
Todd Mintz - 49 minutes ago
LIE #2 There is now human way possible to know what EVERY AMERICAN'S opinion is
Faisal
Faisal - 50 minutes ago
indian passport
Tank gamer
Tank gamer - 51 minute ago
4:24 KNOCK KNOCK IT'S THE USA
It Ain't Over Yeti
It Ain't Over Yeti - 52 minutes ago
this is about 15% correct.
Todd Mintz
Todd Mintz - 53 minutes ago
LIE #1. Vox is implying that no one has to go through a background check at a gun show: FALSE, the only sells that do not require a BGC is a private sell, BUT If you sell a gun to someone that can not legally own that gun you have still broken the law and you can be charged.
Greenfield2034
Greenfield2034 - 54 minutes ago
It does not address any issue. Too many guns around. Either you confiscated them all or let the mass shootings continue. Your choice America.
No Name
No Name - 55 minutes ago
Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERT Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERT Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Y Y Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERT Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERT Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Y Y Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERT Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERT Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Y Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERT Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERT Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Qwerty QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY QWERTY Y Y Y
Arya
Arya - 55 minutes ago
The color of the skin in which we're born is not in our genes, it come from society or outer space or whatever
Rudy Valdez
Rudy Valdez - 57 minutes ago
USA will support you....
Rudy Valdez
Rudy Valdez - 58 minutes ago
awesome about time
shoopwhoopX
shoopwhoopX - 58 minutes ago
Been doing this for years to all species of fish and squids, cant eat store bought fish
Arya
Arya - 58 minutes ago
Barrrr, baaawwrrr, bwwrrrrr
FrogSqueal
FrogSqueal - Hour ago
Beautiful! This is one of the albums that I listened to growing up! My dad was, and is a huge jazz fan, and I never understood why this song was so compelling even though I loved listening to it! Coming back to it all these years later, I can now listen to it with an even greater appreciation!
Jonathan Casillas
Jonathan Casillas - Hour ago
This movie was BoRiNg!!!!!!!!!!!
David Reyes
David Reyes - Hour ago
They should have applied first in Mexico if they come from central America.
Mark Russell
Mark Russell - Hour ago
Know why Republicans don't give all these grand design solutions to domestic problems? Because big government ALWAYS makes the problem worse! Always!
Muctashio
Muctashio - Hour ago
“Nothing about a licensing system will prevent a law abiding citizen... from obtaining a firearm” Later: it will prevent this guy (who, as you said earlier, doesn’t have a record) from obtaining a firearm.
Mark Russell
Mark Russell - Hour ago
Liberal... Prohibition... Liberal... Drinking age.... Liberal..... Federal intervention.... Liberal... Legislation...... Liberal.... Forced Government over State Control.... Liberal.... Liberal .... Liberal... INFLUENCE and Pulling heart strings = how many drunk driving deaths are reduced? NONE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Its ok, it's LIBERAL!
Creepy Stares
Creepy Stares - Hour ago
and the sky is blue, the moon is in the sky. half our laws are made to restrict the freedom for people of color. it's part of the program, especially now with so much for profit prison situations.
Charlotte Mark
Charlotte Mark - Hour ago
Is that Brian David Gilbert?????
Josephtrotter
Josephtrotter - Hour ago
Have you ever heard of the black market before
Zaltic
Zaltic - Hour ago
The Police DEPT need to review the footage because they don't want any private information getting released...
DorothyDandridge
DorothyDandridge - Hour ago
I cried watching this...especially seeing that mother arrested by police and her baby boy jumping up crying....and when they threw the Haitian woman off the ground and cut off the Haitian man’s locks 😭 😢how can they treat a fellow human being this way! They are so racist and anti-black. And btw aren’t Dominicans part black/African...many of they are brown and dark skinned?
doyouevendata
doyouevendata - Hour ago
what camera are you using?
Gabe Jr
Gabe Jr - Hour ago
Soooooo I watch this video. I then went and bought 2 more AR’s. Come take em
Zaltic
Zaltic - Hour ago
TBH I've seen situations end instantly with concealed carriers in the area. We should make more people have guns...
Harth Productions
Harth Productions - Hour ago
15 days doesn't seem like a lot but I guess it's a fair LOT of time for a baby.
cool goggles kid
cool goggles kid - Hour ago
Why couldn’t have it been elephants or something :)
Paan R Peace
Paan R Peace - Hour ago
this situation also happens in Malaysia, where the British under their occupation, bring labour forces from China and India to Malaya (at that time). Today, although these people are recognized as a citizen by the government, they tend to need their own vernacular school with their own language and education syllabus. This made the unifying the people harder and they tend to not respect their country's national language, policies, fight against advantages of Malays and native people. If they think they respect their homeland more than their nationality, they should migrate back to their homeland instead of making a fuss about how their country treating them.
mechaart
mechaart - Hour ago
all 4 million slaves in the United states.... were owned by Democrats.
downhillsyndrome
downhillsyndrome - Hour ago
Literally anyone vaping anything besides a juul: Stranger: are you juuling?
Glenn Glndz
Glenn Glndz - Hour ago
Did she just dive in bed in her outside clothes?😱
Nic Montero
Nic Montero - Hour ago
Who comes up with these tricks?
Dean Knight
Dean Knight - Hour ago
Putin is the most powerful man on earth why wouldn’t Trump like him. He is a closer and unfucked Russia Trump respects power. OBOMA was the worst president ever
Michelle Parson
Michelle Parson - Hour ago
Am I the only one who thinks that he says oujia weird? I say it like o wi ji
Aidanmercs
Aidanmercs - Hour ago
Oof
Nixon's things
Nixon's things - Hour ago
0:19 hey look is lolathon! Jk! It looks like it...
Umang Goyal
Umang Goyal - Hour ago
How to make this type of animation?
bobknight33
bobknight33 - Hour ago
Democrats - the true racists - controlled the media and history way back then and today.
somerandomdude23764
somerandomdude23764 - Hour ago
Imperial > Metric. Fight me Eurofags.
Mark Russell
Mark Russell - Hour ago
Ask yourself this... Is a felon that just killed a family drunk driving restricted from buying a car ever again? The answer is no. May not be able to drive anymore, but can totally own as many cars and use them on his property as much as he wishes! Cars also aren't even mentioned in the constitution as guns are. So spare us (the people that know our rights) the lecture... You can’t arbitrarily restrict sales of a protected right! We may allow you to curb acquisition through background checks, but your reach way beyond our rights ends there! Gun safety is now placed on the individual and the law we already have! YOU MAY NOT MURDER!
bones007able
bones007able - Hour ago
so how do you enforce private sales?... that is how most criminals get their hands on guns
Mark
Mark - Hour ago
How about ban the guns all together?
Space Pickle
Space Pickle - Hour ago
I dont know why so many of these vids exist when I'm sure so many people by now know its rigged😂
Grip Runner 420
Grip Runner 420 - Hour ago
I suppose the ultimate solution is to both sides to get along together, but humans by nature says otherwise so
Hank
Hank - Hour ago
"...the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed." Infringe defined = "act so as to limit or undermine" <---Just in case you need help understanding the big words.
Pat Saxon
Pat Saxon - Hour ago
We all know the reason for the mass school shootings, we removed God and the bible from the public schools and that is a fact!
Mark Russell
Mark Russell - Hour ago
How many guns by a personal sale has been used in a mass shooting? ..... ZERO! #2 we have this system.... its called NIX... this system was put in place by Liberal years ago to "solve the problem", it didn't... partly because it is run by... GOVERNMENT... Secondly, a licence for "gun ownership" is ILLEGAL. Everyone has the right, those that break the law, can be restricted.
Andrew Zhang
Andrew Zhang - Hour ago
2 months after uploading the video the protest keeps on. Please update your protest by adding food teams in front lines, you all looks slim.
CRZY
CRZY - Hour ago
malardo la verdad eh...
mtndewman1022
mtndewman1022 - Hour ago
1:10 "the government won't have enough [money] to pay for what it needs" GOOD
Robert McPherson
Robert McPherson - Hour ago
Minimum Wage is pure Racism.
Hank
Hank - Hour ago
9/14/2019 US is currently 16th in the world for homicide by gun. But we have 3 times more guns than any other country. Interesting. It's almost as if your argument is BS.
Hank
Hank - Hour ago
9/14/2019 US is currently 16th in the world for homicide by gun. But we have 3 times more guns than any other country. Interesting. It's almost as if your argument is BS.
Steven Caesar
Steven Caesar - Hour ago
Sounds like the liberal agenda doesn't care for minorities of people who disagree with them
Granchar 1
Granchar 1 - Hour ago
I shouldn’t have to give the police my finger prints for my constitutional right.
Nyoks
Nyoks - Hour ago
If you know the legends of clutch powers you deserve a veterans discount